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About

Officially the Argentine Republic, the country of Argentina is a federal republic currently headed by President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner which covers almost 2.8 million kilometres squared and is home to over 41 million inhabitants.

The country’s capital is Buenos Aires and the country shares borders with Paraguay and Bolivia to the north, Chile to the west, Uruguay to the east and Brazil to the northeast. It’s also surrounded by the South Atlantic Ocean to the east and the Drake Passage to the south.


Stone Age History

The very earliest evidence of human activity in Argentina was found in the Piedra Museo in Santa Cruz which has been dated to be around 13,000 years old. In addition, the Cueva de Las Manos, also in Santa Cruz, has been dated to be around 12,000 years old.

Bronze Age History

Between 4,000 and 2,000 BC, huge amounts of the country’s indigenous population died out due to an extensive dry season.

Iron Age History

By 1,000 BC, the population had re-diversified and many indigenous peoples existed. Among these were the hunter-gatherers Selknam, Yaghan, Puelche, Querand, Serranos, Tehuelche, Kom and Wichi, the agricultural peoples Charrua, Minuane. Guarani, Toconote, Henia, Kamiare and the Huarpe, trading peoples Diaguita and the warring groups such as the Mapuche (originally from Chile) and the Inca.

1st Century – 15th Century History

The groups thrived for over two thousand years until the Inca conquered much of Argentina. At the same time, other tribes such as the Guaranies had developed and taken over large areas of the country, while the Toba nation, a conglomeration of the Diaguita, the Quilmes and the Calchaqui occupied the northern borders and the Comechingones occupied today’s Cordoba.

16th Century – 19th Century History

The Portuguese were the first Europeans to land in the region, specifically Goncalo Coelho and Amerigo Vespucci in 1502. Ten years later, Joao de Lisboa and Estevao de Frois discovered the Rio de La Plata and began to travel along its estuary, eventually culminating with first contact with the Charrua people, natives of the country. Four years later the Spanish arrived on the shores of Argentina and established a small settlement in 1536 where modern-day Buenos Aires is located. However, the settlement was abandoned in 1541. Cordoba saw its establishment in 1573 and Buenos Aires saw a second, successful establishment in 1580. These cities rapidly fell under the control of the Viceroyalty of Peru, which had been set up under Blasco Nunez Vela in order to help keep control over Spain’s overseas territories in the absence of King Charles I of Spain. However, Francisco de Toledo rapidly ascended into power and took the role of Viceroy.

However, the region developed slowly in comparison to some of the other nearby nations, this was largely in part due to a lack of precious metals making the land undesirable and gold rushes sporadic, if at all. The region eventually had a large resurgence in activity when the Spanish established the Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata in 1776 made up from a combination of Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay and Bolivia. Potosi became a commercial centre in the Viceroyalty due to widespread production of cattle and subsequent exportation of leather, increased maritime activity and various other political reasons.

However, despite the success of the Viceroyalty, cooperation between the regions rapidly unravelled and lack of Spanish support caused it to gradually crack apart. Following the defeat of the Spanish at the Battle of Trafalgar, the British took uncontested maritime supremacy and even tried to invade both Buenos Aires and Montevideo in 1806 and 1807 respectively. Luckily they were forced out of the area by Viceroy and Count Santiago de Liniers of Buenos Aires. Liniers won widespread popularity for his acts of defiance against the British and was elected as the Viceroy on his heroic deeds. However, despite being popular among the Spanish born in Argentina, the Criollos, he was not so popular among the upper class Peninsulars such as Montevideo Governor Francisco Javier de Elio and Merchant Martin de Alzaga. The former created the Junta of Montevideo giving the region the right to ignore any orders from Buenos Aires, meanwhile the latter attempted a mutiny to remove Liniers from power but the mutiny was unsuccessful and the military bodies involved were forcibly disarmed in 1809.

However, the Supreme Central Junta replaced Liniers with Naval Offier Baltasar Hidalgo de Cisneros in the same year and upon accepting the authority of Cisneros as Viceroy, Javier de Elio disbanded the Junta of Montevideo. Additionally, Cisneros renarmed the mutinying parties from several months prior and pardoned all those responsible for the mutiny, reducing Alzaga’s sentence to simple house arrest. Meanwhile across the country, Juan Antonio Alvarez de Arenales deposed the governor of Chuquisaca and the Governor of La Paz was similarly ousted by Colonel Pedro Domingo Murillo. However, the Spanish militaries’ forces from Buenos Aires and Lima vastly outnumbered and overpowered these rebel factions and drove them out of the cities, retaking them with ease. However, the beheadings of the leaders of the rebel factions contrasted sharply with the pardons of sentences due to earlier mutiny attempts by other parties and subsequently the resentment between the upper and lower classes deepened. Eventually, this resentment sparked a revolution and forced talks between governing bodies, in turn forcing the resignation of Cisneros and the appointment of a new junta: the Primera Junta.

The Supreme Central Junta abolished itself in 1810 along with the events of the May Revolution and the Primera Junta became the main governing body for Buenos Aires, but before long this was replaced by the Junta Grande which ruled over the entirety of the Viceroyalty of the Rio de la Plata. However, this in turn was replaced by the First Triumvirate the following year, of which it ruled over the United Provinces of the Rio de la Plata. However, once again the actions of the Triumvirate’s members were limited by repeated struggles for power and eventually it was replaced by the Second Triumvirate in 1812. A year later, the Assembly of Year XIII was called that was expected to write up a constitution and declare independence, but neither occurred and instead the triumvirate was replaced with a head of state office, the Supreme Director.

At the same time as these repeated revolutions had occurred, France and Spain had been at war and upon the ending of the Pensinsular War, many generals transferred overseas from Spain to Argentina to give new strength to the Revolutionary war. One of the generals, Jose de San Martin, took control of Mendoza and created the Army of the Andes, marching into Chile over the Andes and liberating the country from Spanish rule before doing the same with Peru. Following these actions, the Congress of Tucuman was called and Argentina declared itself as independent under the name Argentine in 1816. However, it would be almost a decade before the United Kingdom recognized the country’s independence, which it did upon the signing of a Treaty of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation in 1825, however, despite these recognitions the country still was not recognized as independent by Spain until several decades later.

However, the United Provinces of the Rio de la Plata continued to exist and upon the defeat of the Spanish the nation lost their head of state, causing successive power struggles and various civil wars. At the same time, the Unitarian defeat at the Battle of Cepeda ended the authority of the Supreme Director’s regime as well as the 1819 constitution.

In 1826, another attempt at writing a constitution was made which would instate Bernardino Rivadavia as the President of Argentina, but it found widespread rejection and was a scrapped, largely in part due to Rivadavia’s poor management of the Cisplatine War which in turn caused his resignation.

Through the power vacuum, the Governors of Buenos Aires received the governing authority to manage the country’s international relations, debts and war payments. In 1829, Juan Manuel de Rosas became the driving force behind development in Argentina and effectively ruled until 1852, successfully fending off attacks from overseas countries, neighbouring countries and even coup d’états. However, despite his successes in national defence he was reluctant to call an assembly to create a constitution, which in turn led General Justo Jose de Urquiza from Entre Rios to turn against him, defeating Rosas in the Battle of Caseros in 1852 and calling for an assembly, which eventually developed the Argentine Constitution of 1853. Although not immediately accepted by Buenos Aires which left the federation and rejoined several years later, the same constitution is still in use today, albeit with amendments. Bartolome Mitre became the first president of the country at the same time.

Mitre’s rule saw a quick economic rise in the country as massive developments were made in political structuring, agriculture, railways and ports, and foreign investment rose to an all-time high as immigration into the country skyrocketed. Mitre was also able to successfully defeat the armies of Chacho Penaloza and Juan Saa and was able to ally with Uruguay and Brazil against Paraguay in the War of the Triple Alliance, which saw the defeat and death of Paraguayan President Francisco Solano Lopez as well as over 60% of the Paraguayan population, making it one of the most devastating wars in recent history. However, despite his victory, Mitre’s popularity dropped due to his alliance with Brazil, once one of Argentina’s fiercest rivals, and his betrayal of Paraguay, once one of Argentina’s closest economic allies. He was succeeded in 1868 by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento.

Sarmiento hugely promoted public education, telegraphs and cultural heritages and was able to both defeat the last known Caudillos (military dictators) and was able to soften the blow of the Triple Alliance War which had resulted in the deaths of thousands, the outbreak of diseases such as Cholera and Yellow Fever and the subsequent slowdown of productivity in the country. He was succeeded by Nicolas Avellaneda in 1874.

Avellaneda immediately found issues upon taking presidency, having to deal with economic depression, however, he was able to disperse and eradicate these issues by launching the Conquest of the Desert under his war minister Julio Argentino Roca, whom successfully seized land from the natives and vastly reduced their population. In 1880, Carlos Tejedor, governor of Buenos Aires, attempted to declare succession from the republic, but Avellaneda denied them the right and marched troops into the province, defeating Tejedor’s forces and silencing his succession claims. He was succeeded by his war minister, Roca, in 1880.

Roca was elected due to his popularity gained from his successful campaign in the desert and was able to create strong ties with multiple parties as well as installing several measures to keep control of the political scene during the 1880s, earning him the nickname of ‘The Fox’. He helped shape the country’s economy away from extensive farming and towards industrial agriculture, earning the country some of the highest levels of foreign investment throughout South America. Additionally, universal, free and non-religious education was guaranteed for all children but this was opposed by the Roman Catholic Church and saw the Holy See break off all diplomatic relations with the country for years. Finally, he was able to temporarily resolve some border disputes with Chile with the Boundary Treaty of 1881. After he was unable to be constitutionally re-elected in 1888, he was succeeded by Miguel Juarez Celman.

Celman recognized Roca’s control over the political scene and attempted to reduce it, earning his predecessor’s opposition. This opposition combined with the Long Depression’s effects, pushed the Civic Opposition Party to launch a coup d’état known as the Revolution of the Park and although it failed overall in its goals, it did manage to force Celman to resign.

In 1891, Roca made the proposition that the Civic Union elect a vice-president under him until the next elections, this caused a split in the Civic Union into the Radical Civic Union lead by Leandro Alem and the National Civic Union lead by Bartolome Mitre. However, Roca withdrew his offer, revealing it to be a ploy to divide the Civic Union and reduce their power strategically. Alem committed suicide in 1896 and was succeeded by his nephew Hipolito Yrigoyen. At the same time, Celman was succeeded by Carlos Pellegrini whom attempted to revolve the country’s economic crisis, earning him the name “The Storm Sailor”. Although after fearing a wave of opposition from Roca, he withdrew considerably to avoid incurring The Fox’s wrath. Roca became president again in 1898.


20th Century History

Roca’s policy became increasingly aggressive as he had the military or police crackdown on protests, political activists and suspected rebels. However, towards the end of his second presidency (which ended in 1904) he fell terribly ill, passing away in 1914. He was succeeded by Socialist deputy Alfredo Palacios. Palacios became a defender of the people and pushed the creation of laws protecting the common civilian against sexual exploitation, child labour, excessive working hours and the creation of Sunday rest. He was succeeded by Roque Saenz Pena in 1910.

Pena passed the Ley Saenz Pena which made politically voting a mandatory practice for males ages 18 and over, but kept all votes confidential to allow for unbiased elections to take place. He was succeeded by Hipolito Yrigoyen in 1916. However, Yrigoyen did not have a majority in parliament due to only having 45% of the votes and so out of 80 draft laws proposed, only 26 of them were voted through by the conservative majority. Yrigoyen’s party subsequently pushed for opening the polls to the votes of Argentina’s middle class and this lead to the 1918 Estudiantine Movement at the University of Cordoba which in turn lead to the University Reform and spread out throughout South America. The year later, the Argentine Regional Workers’ Federation called for a general strike and triggered a police shooting, ending up in the deaths of 700 and injury to over 4000. General Luis Dellepiane marched on Buenos Aires to restore order, and despite being called on to imitate a coup d’état, he remained loyal to Yrigoyen. Further social movements were repressed similarly with even more aggression and increased deaths.  

Meanwhile, the First World War had begun and the United States repeatedly urged Argentina to declare war against the Central Powers. However, Yrigoyen’s government remained vigilantly neutral in the war which allowed them to export goods to Europe, support was garnered through this as well as through their minimum wage and right to strike policies. Even after Germany’s sinking of two Argentinian civilian ships, Argentina only expelled the German Ambassador, Karl von Luxburg, out of the country. Yrigoyen even went so far as to hold a conference of Neutral Powers in Buenos Aires, opposing the US’s attempt at drawing in American states into the war. Yrigoyen was succeeded by his rival, Marcelo Torcuato de Alvear, in 1922. This era saw increased Anarchist activity, especially left-wing activism, and extremism. Extremist leaders such as Severino Di Giovanni pushed violent attacks, shootings and bombings with police and military forces, as well as assassination attempts of political figures (including US President Herbert Hoover during his visit to Argentina in 1928). A failed-but-close assassination attempt occurred on Yrigoyen after his re-election into presidency in 1928. However, he was overthrown in a military coup by Jose Felix Uriburu in 1930.

Uriburu began rapidly cracking down on anarchist and communist groups, orchestrating over two thousand illegal executions including that of Severino Di Giovanni himself in 1931. He also attempted to pushed corporatism into the Argentine Constitution but was seen as a move towards fascism by the conservative backers of the coup, causing them to turn their support to General Agustin P. Justo. Justo fraudulently won the 1932 election and advocated a widespread policy of liberal economic moves that only truly benefitted the nation’s upper classes whilst causing corruption on an industrial and political level and slowing national growth. Three years later, Democrat Senator Lisandro de la Torre launched an investigation into several allegations of corruption with the Argentine Beef Production Industry and subsequently charged Minster of Agriculture Luis Duhau and Minister of Finance Federico Pinedo with fraud charges and political corruption. In the exposition of the investigation, Duhau started a fight among the Senators and his bodyguard attempted to kill De La Torre but ended up shooting De La Torre’s friend, Enzo Bordabehere, instead. De La Torre was able to successfully achieve the imprisonment of the head of the Anglo meat company on corruption charges but sadly committed suicide in 1939. Roberto Ortiz was elected president in 1937 among more claims of fraudulence, but he was succeeded by his Vice President Ramon Castillo, due to fragile health, in 1940.

Upon the rise of World War II, Argentina became split in its views. On one hand, the armed forces and civilians wished to stay neutral due to the fear of the spread of communism, on the other hand, the government authorities wanted to become involved on the side of the allies. At the same time, widespread acknowledgement of the electoral fraud coupled with poor labour rights had damaged the relationship between the government and their people and subsequently in 1943 the GOU (Grupo de Oficiales Unidos) militia group marched upon the Casa Rosada, and, after hours of threats, President Castillo resigned, marking the end of the Infamous Decade. One of the GOU’s leaders, Pedro Pablo Ramirez, took power and broke relations with the Axis Powers but abstained with declaring war, effectively pushing the country to complete neutrality in the war. In 1944, Ramirez was replaced by one of the GOU’s other leaders, Edelmiro Farrell, and initially kept the country neutral as well. However, towards the end of the war and seeing the Allies at near-victory they declared a late war on Germany but didn’t provide any military forces.

Meanwhile, the labour situation had been managed by Juan Domingo Peron and his good treatment of the unions had found him incredible support and popularity. Despite being deposed and detained at the Martin Garcia Island, a large-scale demonstration by his supporters in 1945 forced the governments to both free him and restore him to office. This support additionally pushed him further to win the elections in 1946. His policies attempted to set up more unionized working schemes and government programs, increasing government spending and establishing censorship over 110 publications. Although popular in action, his policies caused inflation to soar and saw the peso lose over 70% of its value between 1948 and 1950. At the same time, he promoted individuals largely based on personal loyalty alone and dismissed, imprisoned and even tortured any opposition to his policies, including many capable advisors. He was deposed during a coup in 1955 and replaced with Eduardo Lonardi.

The next ten years saw repeated coup d’états as power struggles caused the country to fall into turmoil and drove the already low economic growth even lower. Lonardi was first succeeded by Pedro Aramburu in 1955, leaving power only shortly after receiving it. A coup was attempted a year later by two Generals, Juano Jose Valle and Raul Tanco, but failed and were executed among several other military officials and at least twenty civilians. He was succeeded by Arturo Frondizi in 1958. He immediately appointed Alvaro Alsogaray as the Minister of Economy, this saw policies causing the peso to devalue further. Simultaneously he followed a laicist program, which sparked the organization of the far-right Tacuara guerrilla forces. The latter engaged in several anti-Semitic bombings and headed demonstrations against US President Dwight Eisenhower during his visit to Argentina, culminating in the imprisonment of several of their leaders.

The military became involved again in 1962 and forced local elections to occur, culminating in the Chairman of the Senate, Jose Maria Guido, claiming presidency on constitutional grounds. Further struggles with power continued when in 1963, right-wing elements of the Argentine armed forces attempted to take control of the government, but was silenced following the deaths of over twenty people. Arturo Illia took presidency in the same year. In 1965, the Tacuara was formally outlawed and it split with some members on the far right and others on the far left. Illia was ousted in a military coup in 1966 and replaced with General Juan Carlos Ongania. Ongania rapidly made changes to the labour situation, revoking worker’s rights to strike, freezing wages’ increase and devaluing the peso by 40%, as well as the education sector, revoking the 1918 university reform, the latter lead to a number of professors, students and graduates occupying the University of Buenos Aires and subsequently, their removal, expulsion and exile from Argentina in 1966. Under rumours of a possible coup d’état, Ongania dismissed the leaders of the Armed Forces and replaced them in 1968. Ongania also developed a controversial plan to eradicate the shanty towns in the country, which met massive opposition. He was replaced with Alejandro Lanusse in 1971.

For the first time in over a decade, Argentina held general elections and Peron’s protégé, Dr. Hector Campora, was voted in as president, winning 49.5% of the votes and garnering support from the Peronist Youth, Montoneros, FAR and FAP, several guerrilla groups. However, despite his strong policies advocating the redistribution of wealth and investment into the national market, the 1973 oil crisis hit the country hard and caused around 600 social conflicts, strikes and occupations in Campora’s first month of presidency. Only months later, Peron returned and assumed presidency but it was marked with controversy when far-right gunmen dressed in camouflage emerged from his speaking platform and took fire on the crowd during his inauguration speech, killing thirteen and injuring more than three hundred mainly Montoneros and Peronist Youth members. Regardless, Peron still maintained 61.85% of the votes and took presidency with his third vice, Maria Estela Isabel Martinez de Peron, as his Vice President.

Meanwhile, extremist groups such as the Triple A had continued to threaten public order through violent acts, and, after the assassination of CGT Trade-Union’s Secretary General Jose Ignacio Rucci by the Montoneros, the government began releasing multiple emergency decrees allowing them the authority to deal with violence and imprison individuals indefinitely without charge. The following elections, Peron won 61.9% of the votes once more and his wife once again took the position of Vice President, but he died shortly afterwards and his wife then took over as President in 1974. However, she was inexperienced with politics and her administration was further threatened by economic downfall through a slower GDP and increased inflation as well as terrorist activity and inter-party struggles. Subsequently, she found herself removed from office via a military coup lead by Lieutenant General Jorge Rafael Videla in 1976. Videla formally assumed the position of President only days later.

Terrorist organizations had been growing increasingly active since Peron’s return, but following the military coup their activity skyrocketed and frequent bombings, kidnappings and assassinations began to occur. Videla himself was the target of three assassination attempts by the ERP (Ejercito Revolucionario del Pueblo or People’s Revolutionary Army) and the Montoneros over the course of a single year. This increased activity forced his hand and he rapidly began to push police and military into the cities. It’s estimated at this time that as many as twenty thousand people ‘disappeared’ whilst in police or military custody, with around half of those being members of the Montoneros and the ERP. A year later in 1978, Videla’s regime rejected the binding Report and Decision of the Court of Arbitration and started Operation Soberania in order to invade the islands of Picton, Nueva and Lennox, starting a conflict with Chile over disputes with the islands once again. However, full scale war was prevented after the Pope’s representative, Antonio Samore, conducted mediation talks between the countries. He stepped down and handed power over to Roberto Viola in 1981.

Shortly after Viola became president he appointed Lorenzo Sigaut as his Finance Minister and Sigaut began to implement policies which abandoned the sliding exchange rate mechanism and further devalued the peso, triggering a recession. Viola was subsequently ousted by a military coup in later on in the same year by Commander-in-Chief of the Army, Lieutenant General Leopoldo Galtieri, whom assumed presidency. Galtieri was initially supported by the United States as ‘a bulwark against communism’, but found widespread controversy when his forces invaded the Falkland Islands, a territory of the United Kingdom, which the United States supported and had been long-standing allies with. Galtieri similarly found initial support for his invasion of the Falkland Islands by the Argentine populace, but before long, the populace realized that Galtieri’s regime was still the oppressive one once ruled by Videla and Viola. Galtieri’s government thought that the UK would not respond militarily, and since the United States wouldn’t interfere through their statements supporting Galtieri, the UK attempted diplomatic negotiations.

However, the negotiations lead nowhere and the UK Government headed by Margaret Thatcher moved to retake the islands by force. Despite having a distinctive geological advantage with superior numbers, Argentina’s military was decimated by the British Army and Navy’s superior training and technology and the Falkland Islands were reclaimed by the UK in under two months in 1982. Galtieri found himself removed as a result of Argentina’s thoroughly humiliating defeat and in 1983 he was imprisoned. Civil rights charges and human rights violations were brought against him and it was recommended that he be stripped of rank, dismissed and executed via firing squad. In 1985, he was cleared of all civil rights charges but a year later in 1986 he was found guilty of mishandling the war and sentenced to imprisonment,  and although he, the Air Force and Navy Commanders-in-Chief attempted to repeal these sentences, they failed and all three were sentenced to twelve years in prison. However, they, alongside 37 other officers, were pardoned by President Menem in 1989.

Meanwhile, the country had finally redeveloped democracy and Raul Alfonsin was constitutionally elected by 52% of the votes, beginning his 6-year term in 1983. He was able to successfully conduct the Treaty of Peace and Friendship of 1984 between Chile and Argentina and this in turn re-established the roots of the Mercosur Trade Bloc. His administration went on to establish civilian control of the armed forces, consolidate democratic institutions and to account for those whom ‘disappeared’ during the Militia’s rule between 1976 and 1983. Additionally, Alfonsin was able to reduce over 50% of corruption in public offices, but struggled with friction between the government and military. Coupled with the failure to deal with economic issues, Alfonsin stepped down six months early and Carlos Saul Menem became the new President in 1989.

Menem began to overhaul Argentine domestic policy and rapidly privatized multiple industries which had, ironically, been previously nationalized by his predecessor, Peron. When Congress was unable to reach a common consensus on his proposed reforms, Menem didn’t hesitate to issue emergency decrees to help him push these policies. However, in 1994 the constitution was reformed and he found his ability to do this had become limited, but despite this setback, he was able to win the next elections with 50% of the vote in 1995 by making a pact with the opposing Radical Party. This in turn saw the rise of the moderate-left FrePaSo coalition. However, despite these incredible developments, Argentina’s economy struggled due to years of military dictatorships preceding its democratic process and by the late 1990s the country had entered another recession. In 1999, Fernando de la Rua became president.

21st Century History

De la Rua set about making spending cuts, provincial revenue-sharing reforms and flexibility of the labour market. These changes were aimed at increasing foreign investment and revenue so that the public debt would not have to be defaulted on. However, towards the end of 2001, the International Monetary Fund pushed the country to deal with its debt and this in turn forced the value of the Peso to be dropped considerably. People feared that it would be devalued further and so massive withdrawals began to occur as capital flight swept across the country, the banks of the country rapidly realized they were sliding down a steep slope and so Domingo Cavello, the Minister of Economy, passed regulations that severely limited withdrawals, effectively freezing the bank accounts of the masses country-wide. This in turn triggered widespread rioting and dozens of deaths and as De La Rua’s administration collapsed and saw his resign as well as those of his ministers. Adolfo Rodriguez Saa was elected by the National Congress to finish De La Rua’s term but he resigned just a week later.

In 2002, Eduardo Duhalde was elected by the National Congress to be president. Duhalde faced a further 29% devaluation of the Peso and the abandonment of the Dollar peg within the first few months of his presidency. Then the national currency depreciated further and by the middle of the year the currency was worth only 25% of its former value. Protests became commonplace by the unemployed piqueteros and the middle class cacerolazos but unlike prior government, Duhalde used a light touch to deal with the protests, minimizing violence and assigned Roberto Lavagna as his Minister of Economy, through Lavagna’s strategies, inflation was brought under control and a year later, he called for elections.

In 2003, Nestor Kirchner came into power and immediately set about overturning controversial amnesty laws, allowing for prosecution of the 1976-1983 dictatorship, whilst changing the leadership of the armed forces and restructuring of the foreign debt.

These measures saw a good economic growth and as a result he was re-elected for President in 2007. However, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, wife to Nestor Kirchner, took over the presidency of her husband less than a year later, but kept him close professionally and his influence was still incredibly visible, even to the point where their joint rule was comparable to a diarchy (where two individuals rule jointly over a nation). Cristina Fernandez proposed a new taxation system for agricultural exports but found herself and her government locked out of the sector for the attempt, culminating in the system being rejected by the Senate.

In 2010, Nestor Kirchner passed away of heart failure and this saw a dramatic change in Cristina Fernandez’s government style, favouring The Campora, a non-violent successor to the Montoneros, led by her son, Maximo Kirchner. Cristina Fernandez was re-elected as President in 2011. 

Wording
Phonetic
English
     
Hola Holl-ah Hello/Hi
Adios Ah-dee-oss Good Bye!
Habla usted Ingles / Espanol Hah-blah oo-stead In-gulls / Ess-span-yoll Do you speak English / Spanish?
Mi nombre es… Mee nom-breh ess My name is…
Me pueden ayudar? Meh pweh-dehn ah-yoo-dah Can you help me?
Estoy buscando… Ess-toy boos-can-doh I’m looking for…
Si / No See / Noh Yes / No
Gracias Grah-see-as Mr / Mrs / Miss
Hoy / Ahora Hoi / Ah-hoar-ah Today / Now
Hoi / Ah-hoar-ah Mah-nar-nar / Aay-err Tomorrow / Yesterday
Este / Que / Aqui / Hay Ess-tey / Kay / Ah-kee / Haay This / That / Here / There

Phrases

Above are a few common Spanish phrases to help you get around.

Languages

Spanish is the most frequent language spoken in Argentina and is spoken by almost every Argentine but the dialect is slightly different from that spoken in Spain.

However, many other languages are spoken in Argentina including English (42.5%), Italian (4%), Arabic (2.5%), German (1.6%), Yiddish (0.8%), Guarani (0.8%), Catalan (0.7%), Quechua (0.3%), Wichi (0.2%), Aymara (0.1%), Welsh (0.1%) and interspersed French throughout the region. Many other tribal languages are also present.
 

Religion

Although historically Argentina has been a majorly Roman Catholic Christian country, the Constitution doesn’t actually enforce an official religion and, furthermore, it actually guarantees freedom of religion. Around 77% of all Argentinians are Catholic with a further 11% Atheist or Agnostic, 9% Evangelical, 1% Jehovah’s Witnesses, 1% Mormons and the remaining 1% are of other religions, mainly Judaism, Islam and Buddhism.

Museums, Galleries & Architecture

Argentina’s architecture comprises a multitude of various styles, most prominently; Indigenous, Colonial, Renaissance and Modern.

The country’s indigenous architectural style includes sites such as Taktillakta at the foot of the Aconquija Mount and the pre-Inca fort in Pucara de Tilcara, Jujuy Province. Here, ruins of a long-forgotten native town, built in the form of huts in close-proximity to one another to form seemingly-random rows of houses, often interlocked and interspersed, and built to last.

Colonial Era buildings see a pre-renaissance style with basic shapes cut out into square buildings. The style is simplistic and straightforward, emphasizing functionality and practicality over aesthetic appeal and often being attached directly to the next building across to allow for possible alterations to be made in the design in case of a merge. This is most visible in the Jesuit Block in Cordoba and of architecture in much of Salta City.

The Renaissance Era saw the rise of structures with a vastly improved and detailed aesthetic appeal, specialized to be eye catching to invoke some forlorn aura of mystery. The style emphasizes a call back to pre-medieval era designs with Roman-style columns and imagery carved into the building materials. You can view styles such as Neo-Renaissance, Baroque and Neoclassical forms on the Church of San Ignacio Mini in the Misiones Province, the Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires and the NH Gran Hotel in Mar del Plata.

Modern styles are most visibly incorporated in the Alas Building, the Catalinas Norte and the Kavanagh Building in Buenos Aires and these include the Rationalist, Postmodern and the Art Deco styles respectively. The styles feature a range of stylistic effects including a heavier use of glass and windows as well as generally higher-rising structures.



Clothing, Dress Style & Etiquette

Today, a wide majority of Argentinians wear modern western-style clothes, but traditionally the clothing style varied greatly and saw European (mainly Spanish) inspired clothing, adapted to the climate of the country.

Men traditionally wore Gaucho (cowboy) outfits of various sorts, these would include a wide-brimmed hat, a poncho (a large cloth draped over the body) and a loose pair of trousers designed for flexibility tucked into shoes, as well as Bombachas (trousers made from strong black cloth). Shoes tend to be made out of strong canvas and rope. Accessories may include the Faja (a brightly coloured waist band worn over the shirt) and Rastras (leather belts).

Women tend to wear long, colourful dresses of various styles but sometimes may wear a long skirt with a loose shirt instead.

Literature, Poetry, Music & Dance

Argentina’s literature historically began in 1550 with the works of Matias Rojas de Oquendo and Pedro Gonzalez de Prado. Prior to this, all stories, tales and records were passed down through generations between the natives through oral retellings. However, Argentine literature didn’t truly kick off until El Matadero was written by Esteban Echeverria in the mid-19th Century. Other notable 19th Century authors include Jose Hernandez and Domingo Faustino Sarmiento and the content widely focuses around Argentina’s independence of Spain as well as the bloody confrontations between the people and their government.

In the 20th Century the tales slowly began developing further towards a crypto-anarchistic view as conflicts between the government and the people became more frequent and escalated into hundreds of deaths. Notable authors from the era include Leopold Lugones, Ricardo Guiraldes, Alfonsa Storni Julio Cortazar and Jorge Luis Borges.

Calendar & Events

The 1st of January marks the country’s first holiday: New Years’ Day. Then for a couple of days in late February to Early March, Carnival and Shrove Tuesday are celebrated respectively. This is closely followed by the March Equinox and then Memorial Day in the middle of March and on the 24th of March respectively.

The Day of the Veterans is celebrated on the 2nd of April, then towards the middle of April several days are celebrated in a row including Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, Easter Sunday and Action Day for Tolerance and Respect between People. On May 1st and 2nd, May Day and Bridge Public Holiday are celebrated respectively, then on the 25th of the same month, National Day is celebrated. About a month later, two days, Flag Day and the June Solstice, are celebrated on the 20th and in the middle of June respectively.

This is followed by Independence Day and the End of Ramadan being celebrated on the 9th and the 28th of July respectively, and then San Martin Day on the 18th of August. Then in the middle of September, the September Equinox is celebrated. Shortly afterwards, the Hebrew Holiday of Rosh Hashana is celebrated.

The Hebrew holidays culminate in the celebration of Yom Kippur on the 4th of October. Then on the 13th of October the country shows its multi-nationalism through the Day of Respect for Cultural Diversity, followed by the Muslim holiday of Muharramn in late October to early November. On the 24th of November, National Sovereignty Day is celebrates and as December rolls around a string of Christian holidays takes place with the Feast of the Immaculate Conception on the 8th, the December Solstice somewhere in the middle, Christmas Day on the 25th, Boxing Day on the 26th and New Years’ Eve on the 31st

By far, Buenos Aires is the biggest party city in the country and there is no club more vocal about it than Million. The club is featured in the middle of a converted mansion and incorporates multiple sweeping staircases lit by candles. The club tends to attract lots of tourists as well as many locals and serves both drinks and food.

Meanwhile, Ushuaia has The Galway, proclaimed to be the world’s southernmost Irish bar. The bar is fairly cheap and attracts all sorts of visitors. Perfect if you’re looking to relax in your evening and enjoy nice views of the Beagle Channel which connects South America to the cold shores and reaches of Antarctica.

If you’re looking for a little more rock n’ roll in your life then maybe consider the Hard Lomo Rock, Mendoza’s Hard Rock Café. On Thursday nights there is an open microphone session and instruments allowing anyone to step up and play as they wish, best of all there’s no dress code and on weekends live shows are frequent!

Back in Puerto Iguazu, the Cuba Libre Bar fuels the fire as blitzing footsteps blaze across the dancefloor to the beat of Latin American music. If you’re someone looking to keep on your toes and blast out a lot of energy as you synchronize to the music and rapidly pick up the pace then the Cuba Libre Bar is for you!

The Borges y Alvarez is El Calafate’s premier chill-bar. It incorporates a nice restaurant and a bookshop in one, allowing you to read a bit of literature while you taste a bit of wine and sink into the nightlife atmosphere surrounded by good friends. 

Money

Argentina uses the Peso as its currency and this can be divided down into 100 Centavos. The currency uses the international currency code ARS and ARS 1 is equal to $0.12 or £0.07.

Currently circulating coins of the Argentinian Peso are available in 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 Centavo variants as well as 1, 2 and 5 Peso variants.
Bank notes are available in 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 and 100 Peso variants.

Economy

Argentina’s biggest industry is in its Service sector which in total contributes over 60% of its annual GDP, these include the telecommunications, tourism, insurance, real estate, transportation and social sectors.

Additionally, the Agricultural centre of Argentina is huge, accounting for around 9% of annual GDP, as the country is one of the world’s biggest agricultural producers. Produce varies and may include beef, grapes, maize, soybeans, sunflower seeds, yerba mate, wheat, squash, sorghum, honey and citrus fruits. Biodiesel is also making notable numbers and is growing at a faster rate every year, making over $2 Billion in exports in 2011 alone.

The country also exports a lot of its natural resources, especially gas and petrol which account for around 4% of the country’s annual GDP. Exports also include a variety of minerals and metals such as copper, magnesium, tungsten, zinc, gold, silver, uranium, sulphur, lead and borate.

Other large scales include the Banking sector and the Industry sector, the latter of which contributes around 16% of the country’s annual GDP and has strong ties into Argentina’s agricultural sector. The main produce is in glass, plastics, lumber, tobacco, printed media, apparel, leather, furniture, recorded media, textiles, tires and cement.

Banking

Although once very sketchy, today the Banking sector is known to be very strong and since 2006 the banks have been improving drastically and rapidly. Banks behave very much like their western counterparts do, offering a duo of accounts: Current Accounts and Savings Accounts. The former offers quicker access and unlimited withdrawals and the latter gives a higher interest rate but may limit one’s ability to withdraw on-the-fly.

Taxes

Taxation in Argentina is applied through Income Tax, Wealth Tax, Value-Added Tax, Inheritance Tax, Corporate Tax, Stamp Tax and Bank Transaction Tax.

Wealth Tax scales according to one’s available wealth and may range from 0.5% to 2.5% of the wealth available. Value-Added Tax is applied at a flat rate of 21% on most products. Inheritance Tax is applied on all transferred items at a rate of 4% when the combined value of said items is over ARS 3 million.

Corporate Tax is applied at 35% on all corporate sales as a flat rate whilst Stamp Tax is applied on the value of all real property at a rate of 1.5% and may be applied to vehicles and other assets. Bank Transaction Tax is applied at a rate of 0.6% on all transactions. Finally, Income Tax is applied on all money earned for work performed inside of the country and is scaled according to how much is earned. 

Although mainly influenced by Spanish origins, Argentina’s cuisine combines a blend of Mediterranean, European and Indigenous varieties and sees a wide range of ingredients from all across the country. Argentina’s national dish is Asado (barbequed meat) which is often accompanied with a social gathering or event of sorts. The country’s cuisine can be broken down into four main areas; Central, North West, North East and South.

Central Argentinian Cuisine has been largely inspired by dishes from the Middle-East, Switzerland and Italy and Germany and subsequently see a range of sauces, sausage dishes, chicken and meat courses, stews and fritters among others. Common dishes include Spaghetti, Gnocchi, Lasagne, Achuras (Cows innards), Morcilla (Blood Sausage), Lomo (Tenderloin) and Choripan (Pork or Lamb sausages in a sandwich).


North Western Argentinian Cuisine sees more Indigenous influences and as a result the dishes of the region typically include more vegetable, cereals and maize (corn). Dishes may include Humita (corn, onions and spices kneaded into dough and boiled in corn husks), Tamales (corn-based dough boiled in corn husks), Empanadas (Meat or Vegetable pasties) and Locro (thick stew made from corn, potatoes, beans and cucurbita soup).

North Eastern Argentinian Cuisine tends to veer closer to native tastes as well with many dishes coming from the Guarani tribe and focusing more on a seafood diet. Meals may include Dorado, Surubi, Silverside, Boga and Pacu (all types of fish), as well as Cassava, Papaya, fruit jams and Yerba Mate which may find their way into dishes such as Chipa (Cassava and Cheese Bread) and Terere (cold water mixed with Yerba Mate, ice and various other herbs such as mint, lemongrass as well as lime and orange juice).

Southern Argentinian Cuisine also include lots of seafood but puts an increased amount of focus on berries, livestock (mainly sheep) and wild meat (mainly boar, stag and pheasant). Dishes often include seafood such as salmon, squid, sea snails, spider crabs and trout as well as berries such as cherries, strawberries, elderberries, bilberries and rosa mosqueta as well as chocolate. Cuisine may include Argentine Chorizos (pork sausages), Curanto (beef, pork, lamb, chicken, sweet potatoes, squashes, cream, pease, cheese, apples and/or potatoes placed on a hot stone that has been dug around a metre and a half into the ground.)

VISA Requirements

Passport holders from the following may stay in Argentina for up to 90 days without a Visa:

  • European Union
  • Andorra
  • Armenia
  • Barbados
  • Bolivia
  • Brazil
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Ecuador
  • El Salvador
  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Hong Kong
  • Honduras
  • Israel
  • Japan
  • Macedonia
  • Mexico
  • Monaco
  • Montenegro
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Russia
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • San Marino
  • Serbia
  • Singapore
  • South Africa
  • South Korea
  • Suriname
  • Thailand
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Turkey
  • Ukraine
  • Uruguay
  • Vatican City
  • Venezuela
Passport holders of the following may stay in Argentina for up to 90 days without a Visa by first paying the reciprocity fee online:
  • Australia
  • Canada
  • United States
Passport holders of the following may stay in Argentina for up to 30 days without a Visa:
  • Jamaica
  • Malaysia
Passport holders of the following may stay in Argentina for varying amounts of time if they use a Travel Certificate issued by Argentina instead of a passport:
  • Kosovo
  • Nauru
  • Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic
  • Taiwan
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu
Health Care

Health Care in Argentina can be divided down into three main types: Public, Private and Social Security, each one financed through their own system. Around 8% of Argentina’s GDP is spent annually on Health Care.

The majority of the Public Sector is both funded and managed by Obras Sociales and they have over 300 institutions for medical care open in the country and roughly own about 75% of all health resources in the entirety of South America. The Private Sector is comprised of over 200 organizations and is funded through over 2 million Argentinian customers. Finally, the Social Security system tends to fall under the control of local governments and can see a little to a lot of cover from those bodies.

Transportation

Argentina’s road system is extensive and spans over 230 thousand kilometres in length across the entirety of the country, the roads, however, see less than a third of themselves being paved. Today, over 9 million vehicles use these roads.

The rail system is also incredibly extensive and sees several systems in place including the Long-distance networks managed by Ferrocentral, Ten Patagonico, Ferrobaires and Trenes de Buenos Aires, the high-speed rail line linking Buenos Aires, Rosario and Cordoba, the high-speed rail line linking Buenos Aires to Mendoza, the high-speed rail line between Buenos Aires and Mar del Plata, the freight service lines and the tourist railway lines such as the Old Patagonian Express, the Train of the End of the World, the Tierra del Fuego, the Tren Historico de Bariloche and the Ten a las Nubes. It’s also important to mention that international lines link Argentina to Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay and Venezuela.

Every capital city in the region has its own airport and there are a number of additional airports in areas such as Bariloche and El Calafate, where tourists are more numerous. The national airline is Aerolineas Argentinas.

The nation has a number of waterways but these are not usually used for passenger transportation apart from the boats that cross from the Rio de la Plata, Buenos Aires to Colonia del Sacramento and Montevideo, Uruguay. It’s mainly used for merchant marine, as is most of the sea vessels which include 137 ships that are at least a kiloton in weight. Of these, 47 are petroleum tankers, 21 are bulk cargo, 21 are standard cargo, 12 are liquefied gas tankers, 12 are combined passenger/cargo, 8 are container cargo, 8 are roll-on/roll-off cargo and 8 are chemical tankers.

Embassies

Embassies in Argentina include:

Albanian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Albania in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Calle Juez Tedin, 3036 (1425) Buenos Aires , Republica Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+541148093574
FAX
+ 541148152512
EMAIL
embassy.buenosaires@mfa.gov.al
 
Algeria
Algerian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Algeria in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Calle Montevideo, 1889 CP 1021 , Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4815-1271/(+54) (11) 4815-5969          
FAX
(+54) (11) 4815-8837
EMAIL
argeliae@interserver.com.ar
DETAILS
Ambassador: Ahcène Boukhelfa
 
Angola
Angolan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Angola in Buenos Aires, Argentina
La Pampa 3452-56, CP 1430 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54 11) 45 54 88 77 / 83 83        
FAX
(54 11) 45 54 89 98
 
Armenia
Armenian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Republic of Armenia in the Argentine Republic
J. A. Pacheco de Melo 1922 C1126AAD, , Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4816-8710         
FAX
(54-11) 4812-2803
EMAIL
armargentineembassy@mfa.am
 
Australia
Australian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Australian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Villanueva 1400, Buenos Aires C1426BMJ, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54 11) 4779-3500       
FAX
(+54-11) 4779-3581
WEBSITE
http://www.argentina.embassy.gov.au/  
EMAIL
dima-buenos_aires@dfat.gov.au
OFFICE HOURS
08:30 - 11:30 Monday - Friday
DETAILS
24 hour emergency consular assistance for Australians: + 61 2 6261 3305
 
Austria
Austrian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Austria in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Calle French 3671, 1425 Buenos Aires , Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4807 9185
(+54) (11) 4807 9186     
FAX
(+54) (11) 4805 4016
WEBSITE
http://www.austria.org.ar/          
EMAIL
buenos-aires-ob@bmeia.gv.at
OFFICE HOURS
Monday - Thursday 9 - 12 PM
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate of Austria in Cordoba, Argentina
Jeronimo Cortez 636, 5000 Cordoba, Argentina
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
(+54) (351) 472 0450
(+54) (351) 472 0455     
FAX
(+54) (351) 424 3626
EMAIL
cemi@cemisa.com
OFFICE HOURS
10.00-12.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Posadas, Argentina
 
Consulate of Austria in Posadas, Argentina
San Luis No. 2492, 3300 Posadas, Prov. Misiones, Argentina
 
CITY
Posadas          
PHONE
(+54) (3752) 427 588     
FAX
(+54) (3752) 427 588
EMAIL
Leb44@ciudad.com.ar
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in San Carlos De Bariloche, Argentina
 
Consulate of Austria in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina
Catedral alta Patagonia S. A. (Schistation Cerro Catedral bei Bariloche), Base Cerro Catedral, 8400, San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina
 
CITY
San Carlos de Bariloche           
PHONE
(+54) (2944) 423 776 160           
FAX
(+54) (2944) 423 776 132
EMAIL
somweber@bariloche.com.ar
 
Bangladesh
Bangladeshi Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Bangladeshi Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Ruggieri 2930, Torre Ducale Piso 1º 'C', 1425 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4804-5279     
FAX
(+54) (11) 4806-0851
EMAIL
horacio@hostel-inn.com / mopid5000@yahoo.com
 
Barbados
Barbadian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Barbados in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av. Cordoba 1309 - 8 Piso A, 1055 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4811-4108 / (+54) (11) 4812-6737        
FAX
(+54) (11) 4812-9870
EMAIL
erig@itzcovichgriot.com.ar
 
Belarus
Belarusian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Republic of Belarus in the Argentine Republic
Cazadores 2166 (CP 1428), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54 (11) 4788-9394       
FAX
+54 (11) 4788-2322
WEBSITE
http://www.argentina.belembassy.org    
EMAIL
argentina@mfa.gov.by
DETAILS
Attention to the Public (Consular Subjects): Monday, Wednesday, Friday of 12,00 to 14.00hs (March - October), Monday, Wednesday, Friday of 10,00 to 12.00hs (November - February).
 
Belgium
Belgian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Belgium in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Defensa, 113 (8 piso), C1065AAA Buenos Aires - Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(00 54 11) 4331 0066/67/68/69   
FAX
(00 54 11) 4331 0814
WEBSITE
http://www.diplomatie.be/buenosaires   
EMAIL
Buenosaires@diplobel.fed.be
OFFICE HOURS
Monday through Friday 8 AM to 13 PM
DETAILS
Emergency: From Argentina: (011) 15 4414 4589 From other countries: 00 54 9 11 4414 4589
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Cordoba, Argentina
F. Posse 2533, Alto Palermo Norte, 5009 Cordoba
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
+ (54) (351) 481.32.98
EMAIL
cordoba@diplobel.be
DETAILS
Consul Alejandro Blaess
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Mar Del Plata, Argentina
 
Consulate of Belgium in Mar del Plata, Argentina
Ruta 88, Km 22, B7600 Mar del Plata, Argentina
 
CITY
Mar del Plata    
PHONE
+ (54) (223) 464.20.00   
FAX
+ (54) (223) 464.20.00
EMAIL
mardelplata!diplobel.pe
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Resistencia, Argentina
 
Consulate of Belgium in Resistencia, Argentina
Avenida Laprida, 2690, 3500 Resistencia, Argentina
 
CITY
Resistencia      
PHONE
+ (54) (3722) 42.42.13
DETAILS
Consul Bernard Ducarme
 
Bolivia
Bolivian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Bolivia in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av. Belgrano No 1670 1er Piso , Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54)(1) 381-4171 381-0539         
FAX
(54)(1) 381-4162
 
Bolivia
Bolivian Embassy in Capital Federal, Argentina
 
Embassy of Bolivia in Capital Federal, Argentina
Av. Corrientes 545, 2do. Piso (1403)
 
CITY
Capital Federal 
PHONE
(54)(1) 394-6640
(54)(1) 394-6642
394-1463          
FAX
(54)(1) 322-0371
EMAIL
secretaria@embajadadebolivia.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
(Lunes a Viernes) de 10:00 a 15:00 hs
 
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Bosnia- Herzegovina in Argentina
Minones 2445 CAP. Fed, 1289 Buenos Aires,
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4896 0284         
FAX
(54-11) 4896 0351
 
Brazil
Brazilian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Brazil in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Cerrito 1350, CP (C1010ABB), Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(5411) 4515-2400
(5411) 4515-2500 (EMBAIXADOR)         
FAX
(5411) 4515-2401
WEBSITE
http://www.brasil.org.ar/
EMAIL
embras@embrasil.org.ar
 
Bulgaria
Bulgarian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Bulgarian embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Antonio de Sukre, 1568, 1428
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(0054 11) 4781-86-44
(0054 11) 4786-62-73     
FAX
(0054 11) 4781-12-14
EMAIL
embular@uolsinectis.com.ar
 
Cameroon
Cameroonian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Cameroon in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Saenz Valiente 2615 B1640GOA - , Martinez, Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4836-2644 int. 104     
FAX
(+54) (11) 4836-2744
EMAIL
hugo@karplus.com.ar
 
Canada
Canadian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Canada in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tagle 2828 (C1425EEH), Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54 11) 4808 1000       
FAX
(+54 11) 4808 1111
WEBSITE
http://www.argentina.gc.ca        
EMAIL
bairs-webmail@international.gc.ca
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Thursday: 8:30-12:30, 13:30-17:30 Friday: 8:30-14:00
 
Chile
Chilean Embassy in Argentina
 
Embassy of Chile in Argentina
Tagle 2762, Capital Federal (1425)
 
PHONE
+54-11-4808 8601 / +54-11-4808 8655 / +54-11-4808 8600           
FAX
+54-11-4804 5927
WEBSITE
http://chileabroad.gov.cl/argentina/
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to friday of 9:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Bahia Blanca, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Belgrano 503; Codigo Postal 8000
 
CITY
Bahia Blanca    
PHONE
+54-291-453 1516 / +54-291-455 0220 / +54-291-451 6369
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Bariloche, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Juan Manuel de Rosas 180.
 
CITY
Bariloche         
PHONE
+54-2944 431680 / +54-2944 423050
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Chile in Argentina
Diagonal Norte Avenida Pdte. Roque , Saenz Peña Nº 547, Piso 2, C.P. , 1035AAA, Buenos Aires.
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-4331 6228 / +54-11-4331 6229/ +54-11-4331 6230
FAX
+54-11-4331 6235
EMAIL
cgbairar@consuladodechile.org.ar/
OFFICE HOURS
monday to friday of 09:00 to 13:00
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Almirante Brown 456, Entrepiso, , oficina 3; 9000 Comodoro Rivadavia.
 
CITY
Comodoro Rivadavia    
PHONE
+54-297-446 2414 / +54-297-447 1043
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Calle Buenos Aires No 1386, Barrio , Nueva Cordoba, C.P.5000, Córdoba.
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
+54-351-469 6543 / +54-351-469 2010    
FAX
+54-351-469 1944
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Mar Del Plata, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Calle Santa Fe 3650 CP 7600
 
CITY
Mar del Plata    
PHONE
+54-223-493 7100 /+54-223-491 0732
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Belgrano 1080 Mendoza-CP 5500., Mendoza
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
+54-261-425 5024/ +54-261-425 4844     
FAX
+54-261- 429 7297
EMAIL
cgchilmen@itcsa.net
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 08:00 a 13:00
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Neuquen, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Calle La Rioja No241 de Neuquen
 
CITY
Neuquen          
PHONE
+54-0299-4422447 +54 -0299-4422727 +54-0299-4485689
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Thursday 9:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30 Friday 8:00 to 14:00 (una hora para almuerzo).
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Rio Gallegos, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Mariano Moreno 148; Casilla de Correo 114.
 
CITY
Rio Gallegos    
PHONE
+54-2966-422 364 +54-2966-436 625
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00 and 14:00 to 17:30
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Rio Grande, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Avenida Belgrano Nº 369, Rio Grande. Tierra del Fuego. Argentina
 
CITY
Rio Grande      
PHONE
+54-2964 -430 523 / +54-2964-430 826   
FAX
+54- 2964-430 862
OFFICE HOURS
* Monday to friday 9:00 to 14:00 * Telephone care 8:00 to 17:00
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Calle La Rioja Nº241 de Neuqúen
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
+54-0299-4422447 / +54 -0299-4422727  
FAX
+54-0299-4485689
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to friday of 9:00 to 14:00
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Salta, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Santiago del Estero Nº 965 Salta.
 
CITY
Salta    
PHONE
+54-387-431 1857 +54-387-421 5757
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Ushuaia, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Chile in Argentina
Jainen 50, Ushuaia.
 
CITY
Ushuaia           
PHONE
+54-2901-430 909 / +54-2901-430 910    
FAX
+54-2901-430 661
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 9:00 to 13:00
 
China
Chinese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Chinese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Crisologo Larrade 5349, Cap. Fed., Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
005411-45478100
005411-45478199          
FAX
005411-45451141
WEBSITE
http://ar.chineseembassy.org    
EMAIL
embchinaargentina@hotmail.com
 
Colombia
Colombian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Colombia in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Carlos Pellegrini 1363 Piso 3, CP (1011AAA), Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54 11 43250258/0494/1106        
FAX
54 11 43229370
EMAIL
ebaires@minrelext.gov.co
 
Costa Rica
Costa Rican Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Costa Rica in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Avenida Callao 1769 7 B Buenos Aires, Argentina Federal Capital Republica
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(00541) 14-815-0072      
FAX
(00541) 14-814-1660
EMAIL
embarica@fibertel.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
10 am to 3 pm
 
Costa Rica
Costa Rican Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Costa Rica in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av. Callao 1769 7º B (1024), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires, Republica Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(005411) 4815-0072       
FAX
(005411) 4814-1660 y 4815-0072
EMAIL
conrica@fibertel.com.ar
 
Croatia
Croatian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Republic of Croatia in the Argentine Republic
Gorostiaga 2104, (1426) Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
00 54 11 47 77 6409, 4778 0203 Cons. 47 77 7284          
FAX
00 54 11 47 77 9159 Cons. 47 77 0980
EMAIL
croemb.ar@mvpei.hr,consulado.ar@mvpei.hr
OFFICE HOURS
Working hours: " Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 9:00-12:00
 
Croatia
Croatian Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Consulate of the Republic of Croatia in Rosario, Argentina
Sarmiento 722-1, 2000 Rosario, Argentina
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
00 54 341 52 99 909      
FAX
00 54 341 52 99 909
EMAIL
drazen@studiosrl.com.ar,construye@studiosrl.com.ar
 
Croatia
Croatian Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate of the Republic of Croatia in Cordoba, Argentina
Antonio Nores 5412, 5147 Granja de Funes, Cordoba, Argentina
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
00 54 3543 443 857       
FAX
00 54 3543 443 873
EMAIL
nicolosnakic@hotmail.com
 
Croatia
Croatian Consulate in San Miguel De Tucuman, Argentina
 
Consulate of the Republic of Croatia in San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina
Av. Mate de Luna 3050, (4000) San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina
 
CITY
San Miguel de Tucuman
PHONE
00 54 381 4238333        
FAX
00 54 381 4005150
 
Cuba
Cuban Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Cuba in Buenos Aires, Argentina
No. 1810 Virrey del Pino and / Arribeños and 11 de Septiembre, CP: C1426EGF, Belgrano, Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(5411) 4782-9049, 4782-9149, 4782-9089
FAX
(5411) 4786-7713
WEBSITE
http://www.cubadiplomatica.cu/argentina           
EMAIL
noticias@ar.embacuba.cu
OFFICE HOURS
Monday through Friday, from 09:00 to 13:00 Closed on holidays in Cuba
DETAILS
Ambassador: His Excellency Mr. George N. Lamadrid Mascaro
 
Cyprus
Cypriot Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate-General of the Republic of Cyprus in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Rafael Hernandez 2766, C1428CFF , Capital Federal , Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54114 5117920/ 54114 5117927           
FAX
+54114 5117926
EMAIL
consuladochipre@fibertel.com.ar,nik@faroshipping.com.ar
 
Czech Republic
Czech Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Czech Republic in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Junin 1461, 1113 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
0054 - (011) - 4807 3107
FAX
0054 - (011) - 4800 - 1088
WEBSITE
http://www.mzv.cz/buenosaires 
EMAIL
buenosaires@embassy.mzv.cz
OFFICE HOURS
Office Hours: Monday - Friday: 08.30 - 17.00 Opening Hours For Public: Monday - Friday: 10.00 - 12.00
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic in Mendoza, Argentina
Av. Espana 1340, piso 9, oficina 21-22, 5500 Mendoza, Argentina
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
0054261/4232148          
FAX
0054-261/4381592
EMAIL
mendoza@honorary.mzv.cz
OFFICE HOURS
Office Hours: Monday - Friday: 09.00 - 13.00, 16.00 - 20.00
Opening Hours For Public: Monday - Friday: 09.00 - 13.00
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Chaco, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic in Chaco, Argentina
Yugoeslavia 655, Presidencia Roque Saenz Pena, Provincia Chaco, 3700 Argentina
 
CITY
Chaco  
PHONE
0054/3732-425977
EMAIL
saenzpena@honorary.mzv.cz
OFFICE HOURS
Monday - Wendesday 16.00 - 18.00
Opening Hours For Public Monday - Wendesday 16.00 - 18.00
 
Denmark
Danish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Royal Danish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Avenida Leandro N. Alem 1074, Piso 9, C1001AAS
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54 11 4312 6901         
FAX
+54 11 4312 7857
WEBSITE
http://www.buenosaires.um.dk  
EMAIL
bueamb@um.dk
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Thursday: 8:00am to 4:00pm Friday: 8:00am to 1:00pm
 
Dominican Republic
Dominican Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of The Dominican Republic
Ave. Santa Fe N° 830/ Piso 7° Buenos Aires Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(5411) 4312- 9378         
FAX
(5411) 4894-2078
EMAIL
consuldo@hotmail.com
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Ecuador in Argentina
Av. Quintana 585 piso 9, C1129 ABB
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(00 54 11) 4804 0073; (00 54 11) 4806 3464; (00 54 11) 4804 3051
FAX
(00 54 11) 4804 0074
EMAIL
embecuador@embecuador.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
9 am - 2 pm; 4pm-7pm
DETAILS
Ambassador: Wellington Sandoval
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Ecuador in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av. Quintana 585, piso 10, C1129 ABB
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(00 54 11) 8046408
EMAIL
consuldorbaiec@embecuador.com.ar
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate of Ecuador in Cordoba, Argentina
Av. Concepcion Arenal 1078, Barrio Rogelio Martinez, 5000
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
(0054 351) 468 4174
EMAIL
consuljmcano@arnet.com.ar
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in La Plata, Argentina
 
Consulate of Ecuador in La Plata, Argentina
Calle 48, No.558, entrepiso, B1900 AMX
 
CITY
La Plata           
PHONE
(0054 221) 48225555
EMAIL
escriber@netverk.com.ar
DETAILS
Consul Ad-Honorem: Escribano Tomas Diego Bernard
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate of Ecuador in Mendoza, Argentina
Francisco J. Moyano 1591, 5500
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
(0054261) 429 6416
EMAIL
consuldormza@ciudad.com.ar, brk@consuladoecuadormendoza.com
DETAILS
Consul Ad-Honorem: Julia Bernardita Romero de Battiston
 
Egypt
Egyptian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Egypt in Argentina
Embajada de Egipto3140 Virrey Del Pino,(codigo Postal 1426)Belgrano(R)
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+5411)45533311          
FAX
(+5411)45530067
 
El Salvador
Salvadoran Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of El Salvador in Argentina
Calle Suipacha 1380, Capital Federal
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
00 54 11 4325-0849 or 00 54 11 4325- 8588        
FAX
00 54 11 4314-7628
 
Equatorial Guinea
Equatorial Guinean Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Equatorial Guinea in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Gurruchaga 2364, Piso 2 '8' 1425
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54-11 4831 9676
 
Finland
Finnish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Finland in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Avenida Santa Fe 846, 5to. piso, 1059
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 4312 0600       
FAX
(+54-11) 4312 0670
WEBSITE
http://http://www.finlandia.org.ar/           
EMAIL
sanomat.bue@formin.fi
OFFICE HOURS
from Monday to Thursday - from 9 am to 12
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Cordoba, Argentina
Bv. Chacabuco 1160, 5000
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
(54-351) 420 8200/420-8254       
FAX
(54-351) 420 8201/ 420-8336
EMAIL
mbperez@arcor.com.ar
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Mendoza, Argentina
Roque S. Pena 3531, M5509XAF Vistalba, Lujan de Cuyo
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
54-261) 498 3504/9408  
FAX
(54-261) 498-9406/9400
EMAIL
iouet@cpwines.com
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Obera, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Obera, Argentina
Lote 15, Seccion 'C', 3361 Colonia Guarani, Provincia de Misiones
 
CITY
Obera  
PHONE
(54-3755) 408945          
FAX
(54-3755) 405766
EMAIL
hugoa_sand@yahoo.com.ar
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Rosario, Argentina
Cordoba 1452, 9mo. piso, 2000, Provincia de Santa Fe
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
(54-341) 522 1600/1635 
FAX
(54-341) 522 1601
EMAIL
alabern@bcr.com.ar
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Salta, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Salta, Argentina
Caseros 1509, 4400 Provincia de Salta
 
CITY
Salta    
PHONE
+54 (0)387 422 1942     
FAX
+54 (0)387 432 1881
EMAIL
rborla@epassaporte.com
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Ushuaia, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Ushuaia, Argentina
Gobernador Paz 1569, 9410, Prov. Tierra del Fuego
 
CITY
Ushuaia           
PHONE
(54-2901) 423 240         
FAX
(54-2901) 423 240
EMAIL
antartur@tierradelfuego.org.ar
 
France
French Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of France in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Cerrito 1399, , 1010
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54 11 4515-7030           
FAX
54 11 4515-7034 or 4515-0120
WEBSITE
http://www.embafrancia-argentina.org/   
EMAIL
ambafr@abaconet.com.ar
 
France
French Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate General of France in Buenos Aires, Argentina
1253 Basavilbaso C 1006AAA
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
[54] (11) 45 15 69 00     
FAX
[54] (11) 45 15 69 51
WEBSITE
http://www.consulfrance-buenos-aires.org/         
EMAIL
info@consulfrance-buenos-aires.org
DETAILS
Consul general : M. Patrick FLOT
 
Gabon
Gabonese Embassy in Argentina
 
Av. Figueroa Alcorta 3221 1425 Buenos Aires
1253 Basavilbaso C 1006AAA
 
PHONE
54 (11) 4 801-9840        
FAX
54 (11) 4 801-9832
 
Germany
German Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Germany in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Calle Villanueva 1055, C1426BMC, Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
005411 4778 2500         
FAX
005411 4778 2550
WEBSITE
http://www.buenos-aires.diplo.de          
EMAIL
administracion@embajada-alemana.org.ar
 
Germany
German Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in Cordoba
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, Elíseo Canton 1870 -, Barrio Villa Paez,X5003AHB Córdoba,
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
(0054 351) 489 09 00     
FAX
(0054 351) 489 08 09
EMAIL
consul@oechsle.com.ar
 
Germany
German Consulate in Eldorado, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in Eldorado
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, , Avda. San Martin 1666, 1° piso,N 3380ABQ Eldorado,
 
CITY
Eldorado         
PHONE
(0054 3751) 42 32 14     
FAX
(0054 3751) 42 40 77
EMAIL
wachnitz@ceel.com.ar
 
Germany
German Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in Mendoza
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, Montevideo 127, piso 2° , Depto. 1, M5500GGC Mendoza. Argentina.
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
(0054 261) 429 65 39     
FAX
(0054 261) 429 66 09
EMAIL
fhilbing@yahoo.com.ar
 
Germany
German Consulate in Posadas, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in Posadas
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, Junin 1811, Piso 1°, Of. 1°, N3300MRM Posadas, Misiones.
 
CITY
Posadas          
PHONE
(0054 3752) 43 55 08     
FAX
(0054 3752) 43 05 70
EMAIL
consulado@estudio.kegler.com.ar
 
Germany
German Consulate in Salta, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in Salta
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, Gral. Las Heras 3, A 4400 DUA Salta, Argentina.
 
CITY
Salta    
PHONE
(0054 387) 422 90 88     
FAX
(0054 387) 492 11 84
EMAIL
consusal@arnet.com.ar
 
Germany
German Consulate in San Carlos De Bariloche, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina.
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, Emilio Morales 460, R8400GHJ San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina.
 
CITY
San Carlos de Bariloche           
PHONE
(0054 2944) 42 56 95     
FAX
(0054 2944) 42 50 17
EMAIL
consuladobariloche@gmail.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in San Miguel De Tucuman, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in San Miguel de Tucuman, Argentina.
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, San Martin 631, 6A, T4000 CVM San Miguel de Tucumán.
 
CITY
San Miguel de Tucuman
PHONE
(0054 381) 421 58 11     
FAX
(0054 381) 421 58 11
EMAIL
consuladoalemantuc@arnet.com.ar
 
Germany
German Consulate in Santa Fe, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in Santa Fe
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, Juan de Garay 2957, S3000CRK Santa Fé.
 
CITY
Santa Fe          
PHONE
(0054 342) 459 75 44     
FAX
(0054 342) 459 97 84
EMAIL
consuladohonorariosfe@hotmail.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in Ushuaia, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate General of Germany in Ushuaia
Cónsul Honorario de la República Federal de Alemania, Alem 966, V9410ACT Ushuaia, Argentina.
 
CITY
Ushuaia           
PHONE
(0054 2901) 43 07 63     
FAX
(0054 2901) 43 07 63
EMAIL
rodolfowantz@yahoo.com.ar
 
Greece
Greek Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Greek Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Arenales 1658, Cap. Federal 1061
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(005411) 48114811        
FAX
(005411) 48162600
EMAIL
gremb.bay@mfa.gr
 
Greenland
Greenlandic Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Royal Danish Embassy in Argentina
Av. L.N. Alem 1074, P. 9 C1001AAS, 1001 Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54 11 4312 6901         
FAX
+54 11 4312 7857
WEBSITE
http://www.buenosaires.um.dk  
EMAIL
bueamb@um.dk
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Thursday: 8:00 am to 4:00 pm Friday: 8:00 am to 1:00 pm
DETAILS
The Faroe Islands and Greenland are part of the Kingdom of Denmark. As a main principle, the Danish Constitution stipulates that the foreign and security interests for all parts of the Kingdom of Denmark are the responsibility of the Danish government.
 
Guatemala
Guatemalan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Guatemala in Argentina
Avenida Santa Fé # 830, 5o. Nivel Código Postal 1059, Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
0054-1 4313-9160 / 0054-1 4313-9180     
FAX
0054-1 43113-9181
EMAIL
embargentina@minex.gob.gt
 
Haiti
Haitian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Haiti in Argentina
Av. Figueroa Alcorta, 3297-1425
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
541-807-0211 or 541-802-5979   
FAX
541-802-3984
 
Honduras
Honduran Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Honduras in Argentina
Ave. Callao 1564, 2do.Piso A , Codigo Postal 1024
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
00 - 54 11 - 4806-9914   
FAX
00 - 54 11 - 4806 9880
EMAIL
embajadadehonduras@fibertel.com.ar
 
Honduras
Honduran Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Honduras in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Ave. Callao 1564, 2do.Piso A
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54 11 - 4803-0077 /  54 11  4803-1769           
FAX
54 11 - 4807-5710
EMAIL
embajadadehonduras@fibertel.com.ar
 
Hungary
Hungarian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Hungary in Argentina
Coronel Diaz 1874-78 Buenos Aires 1425
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
11-48220767     
FAX
11-48053918
 
Iceland
Icelandic Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Iceland in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Parána 843, Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(11) 4793 1282  
FAX
(11) 4792 1282
EMAIL
gorantres@fibertel.com.ar
 
India
Indian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of India in Argentina
Torre Madero, 19th Floor Avenida Eduardo Madero, 942 Buenos Aires - C11006ACW
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
00-54-11-43934001, 43934156    
FAX
00-54-11-43934063, 43935161
WEBSITE
http://www.indembarg.org.ar/    
EMAIL
indemb@indembarg.org.ar
OFFICE HOURS
Office Timings 0900 hrs to 1300 hrs and 1400 to 1730hrs visa timings 1000 hrs to 12.30 hrs and 1400 to 1600hrs
 
Indonesia
Indonesian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Indonesia in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Mariscal Ramóon Castilla 2901, 1425 Capital Federal Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4807-2211, 4807-2956, 4807-3324           
FAX
(54-11) 4802-4448
WEBSITE
http://www.indonesianembassy.org.ar   
EMAIL
emindo@indonesianembassy.org.ar
OFFICE HOURS
9:00 am to 5:00 pm Monday to Friday
 
Ireland
Irish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Ireland in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Avenida del Libertador 1068, 6th Floor , C1112ABN
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 57870801        
FAX
(+54 11) 57870802
WEBSITE
http://www.embassyofireland.org.ar      
EMAIL
bContactuenosairesembassy@dfa.ie
OFFICE HOURS
Public office is open Monday to Friday from 09:00 - 13:00
DETAILS
Ambassador: His Excellency James McIntyre Secretary: Andrew Noonan
 
Israel
Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Israel in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Embassy Av., De Mayo 701, Piso 10 Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54 -11-4338 2525 / 2551 / 2530  
FAX
54-11-43382555
WEBSITE
http://buenosaires.mfa.gov.il    
EMAIL
consular2@buenosaires.mfa.gov.il
OFFICE HOURS
The Embassy is open from 9 to 17.00 hrs (from Monday to Thursday) and from 9 to 14.30 hrs (on Fridays)
 
Israel
Israeli Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Israel in Mendoza, Argentina
Olascoaga 838 -(5500), Mendoza - Argentina
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
+54 - 61 - 380642          
FAX
+54 - 61 - 235940
EMAIL
cisramdz@satlink.com
 
Italy
Italian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Italy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Billinghurst 2577
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+5411 4801 3232          
FAX
+5411 4011 2159
WEBSITE
http://www.ambbuenosaires.esteri.it      
EMAIL
stampa.buenosaires@esteri.it
 
Italy
Italian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
General Consulate of Italy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Reconquista 572 - (C1003ABL) Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
00541141144800           
FAX
00541141144799
WEBSITE
http://www.consbuenosaires.esteri.it      
EMAIL
segreteriacg.buenosaires@esteri.it
 
Italy
Italian Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Italy in Cordoba, Argentina
Av. Velez Sarsfield 360 - 5000 Cordoba
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
00543515261051, 00543515261051        
FAX
00543515261010
WEBSITE
http://www.conscordoba.esteri.it           
EMAIL
passaporti.cordoba@esteri.it
 
Italy
Italian Consulate in La Plata, Argentina
 
General Consulate of Italy in La Plata, Argentina
Calle 48 n.869 CAP. 1900 La Plata
 
CITY
La Plata           
PHONE
00542215218800           
FAX
5218828
WEBSITE
http://www.conslaplata.esteri.it  
EMAIL
segreteria.laplata@esteri.it
 
Italy
Italian Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate of Italy in Mendoza, Argentina
Calle Necochea n. 712 - 5500 Mendoza
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
00542615201400           
FAX
5201401
WEBSITE
http://www.consmendoza.esteri.it          
EMAIL
consolato.mendoza@esteri.it
 
Italy
Italian Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
General Consulate of Italy in Rosario, Argentina
Montevideo 2182 - Rosario
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
00543414407020           
FAX
00543414258189
WEBSITE
http://www.consrosario.esteri.it 
EMAIL
titolare.rosario@esteri.it
 
Italy
Italian Consulate in Mar Del Plata, Argentina
 
Italian Consulate in Mar del Plata, Argentina
Falucho 1416 - 7600 Mar del Plata
 
CITY
Mar del Plata    
PHONE
00542234864214           
FAX
00542234518623
WEBSITE
http://www.consmardelplata.esteri.it      
EMAIL
segreteria.mardelplata@esteri.it
 
Jamaica
Jamaican Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Jamaica in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Rivadavia 829 C-1002-AAG Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54-11-4331-8787 / 54-11-4382-8180        
FAX
54-11-4331-7740
EMAIL
dougall@dougall-ab.com.ar
 
Japan
Japanese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Japan in Buenos Aries,Argentina
Bouchard 547, Piso 17 C1106ABG , Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Repúublica Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4318-8200         
FAX
(54-11) 4318-8220
WEBSITE
http://www.ar.emb-japan.go.jp/  
EMAIL
-
 
Kuwait
Kuwaiti Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Kuwaiti Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
St. Uruguay 739 (1015) Cap. Fed.
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54(11) 4374 7202 / +54(11) 4374-7204  
FAX
+54(11) 4374 8718
EMAIL
info@kuwait.com.ar
 
Lebanon
Lebanese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Lebanon in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lebanese Embassy , Av.del Libertador 2354, 1425 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4802-0466 / 4492       
FAX
(+54) (11) 4802-2909
WEBSITE
http://www.ellibano.com.ar        
EMAIL
prensa@ellibano.com.ar, tramites@ellibano.com.ar
 
Lebanon
Lebanese Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Lebanon in Argentina
Rondeau 547 P.B, Loc 2 500
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
+ 543514239409           
FAX
+ 543514239409
 
Liberia
Liberian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate General of Liberia in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Liberian Consulate General , Av. Carlos Pellegrini 1063 - Piso 2º 'A', 1009 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4326-1892 / 3807       
FAX
(+54) (11) 4326-3807 / 1892
DETAILS
General Consul: Mr Gerardo Bernstein
 
Libya
Libyan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Libya in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Cazadores 2166, 1428 Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(1) 788-3745, 788-3760
 
Lithuania
Lithuanian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Lithuania in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Calle Mendoza 1018 (1428), Buenos Aires - Capital Federal, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54 11 4781 9189         
FAX
+54 11 4785 7915
WEBSITE
http://ar.mfa.lt  
EMAIL
ambasada@lituania.org.ar
 
Lithuania
Lithuanian Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Honorary Consul in Argentina (Rosario)
Tucuman 2744,, Rosario, Santa Fe S2000JVL, Argentina
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
+54 3414387389
EMAIL
repsysrub@arnet.com.ar
 
Lithuania
Lithuanian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Honorary Consul in Argentina (Buenos Aires)
Florida 15 P4 [C1005AA], Buenos Aires,, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54 11 43331 1525; +54 11 43331 1528
EMAIL
snunes@abogados.net.ar
 
Malaysia
Malaysian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Malaysia in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Villanueva 1040, (1426) Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4776-0504 or 4776-2553 
FAX
(54-11) 4776-0604
WEBSITE
http://www.kln.gov.my/perwakilan/buenosaires   
EMAIL
malbnaires@kln.gov.my, mwbaires@fibertel.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
Work day: Monday - Friday 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. Holiday :        Saturday and Sunday
 
Malta
Maltese Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Malta in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Esmeralda 684 7th floor, C1007ABF Buenos Aires , Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
0054 (11) 4325 0741/ 0778/ 0756; 0054 (11) 4393 7879/ 8373       
FAX
0054 (11) 4328 4854
EMAIL
maltaconsul.buenosaires@gov.mt
 
Mexico
Mexican Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Mexico in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Arcos 1650, Belgrano, 1426 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4118-8800         
FAX
(54-11) 4118-8837
WEBSITE
http://www.embamex.int.ar        
EMAIL
embamexarg@interlink.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
09:30 a 17:30 hrs.
 
Monaco
Monegasque Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Monaco in Argentina
Av. Eduardo Madero 1020, piso 5 1106
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54.11.4312.7526         
FAX
+54.11.4311.3560
 
Morocco
Moroccan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Kingdom of Morocco in Buenos, Aires Argentina
Mariscal Ramon Castilia 2952, 1425 Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 48018154, 48018157    
FAX
(+54-11) 48020136
EMAIL
sifamabueno@peoples.com.ar
 
Netherlands
Dutch Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Netherlands in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Edificio Porteno Plaza II, Olga Cossenttini 831, piso 3, (C1107BVA) Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4338-0050         
FAX
(54-11) 4338-0060
WEBSITE
http://www.mfa.nl/bue-es/         
EMAIL
bue@minbuza.nl
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate Cordoba Argentine Republic
Av. Chacabuco 716, 5000 Cordoba, Argentina
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
00-54-351-4208200        
FAX
00-54-351-4208201
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate of Netherlands in Mendoza, Argentina
Boulogne Sur Mer 889, 6th Floor, 5500 , Ciudad de Mendoza, 5500
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
00-54-261-425-2823       
FAX
00-54-261-4238565
EMAIL
iouet@bodegasalentein.com
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 09:00-13:00
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Rosario De Santa Fe, Argentina
 
Consulate of Netherlands in Rosario de Santa Fe, Argentina
Cordoba 1077, 2000 Rosario de Santa Fe
 
CITY
Rosario de Santa Fe     
PHONE
00-54-341-4495080        
FAX
00-54-341-4259696
EMAIL
schopticas@infovia.com.ar
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Tres Arroyos, Argentina
 
Consulate of Netherlands in Tres Arroyos, Argentina
San Lorenzo 159, 7500 Tres Arroyos
 
CITY
Tres Arroyos    
PHONE
00-54-2983-424147        
FAX
00-54-2983-430568
EMAIL
consulado@3net.com.ar
 
New Zealand
Kiwi Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
New Zealand Embassy Buenos Aires, Argentina
Carlos Pellegrini 1427, 5th Floor Capital Federal CP1011
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-4328-0747         
FAX
+54-11-4328-0757
WEBSITE
http://www.nzembassy.com/home.cfm?c=25     
EMAIL
kiwiarg@speedy.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
Public Opening Hours: Mon - Fri 09.30 - 12.30
DETAILS
Ambassador: H.E. Ms Lucy Duncan
 
Nicaragua
Nicaraguan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Nicaragua
Avenida Corrientes 2548, 4, 1046 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 49513463        
FAX
(+54-11) 49527557
 
Nigeria
Nigerian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Nigeria in Buenos Aires, Argentina
2647 Rosales Street, Olivos 1636 Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 47997139, 47945946, 47902031
FAX
(+54-11) 47944061
 
Norway
Norwegian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Royal Norwegian Embassy in Buenos Aires
Carlos Pellegrini 1427, 2do piso,, C1011AAC
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-1143-2887-17         
FAX
+54-1143-2890-48
WEBSITE
http://www.noruega.org.ar/        
EMAIL
emb.buenosaires@mfa.no
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 9:30 - 14:00
 
Pakistan
Pakistani Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Pakistan in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Olleros 2130, 1426
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54-11) 4775 1294 / 4773-8081   
FAX
(+54-11) 4776 1186
WEBSITE
http://www.embassypakistan.com.ar/    
EMAIL
parepbaires@sinectic.com.ar
DETAILS
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m
 
Palestine
Palestinian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Palestine in Argentina
Mendoza 1821 Piso 8
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+ 54 1-4325121 
FAX
+ 54 1-7851041
WEBSITE
http://www.palestina.int.ar/wp/   
EMAIL
jerusalem@mianet.com.ar
 
Panama
Panamanian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Panama Embassy in Argentina
Av. Santa Fe 1461 - Piso 5º, 1050
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 48138543, 48167384    
FAX
(+54-11) 48110083
EMAIL
panama@ciudad.com.ar, epar@fibertel.com.ar
 
Panama
Panamanian Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate of Panama in Argentina
Paseo Sarmiento 49-9, Dept. A, 5500 Mendoza, Argentina, -, -
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
0054-26-1425-5678        
FAX
0054-26-1425-5678
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
hfgg@impsat1.com.ar
 
Paraguay
Paraguayan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Paraguay in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Las Heras 2545, 1425
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4802-3826/4802-3432 
FAX
(+54) (11) 4801-0657 or (+54) (11) 4804-0437
 
Peru
Peruvian Embassy in Lima, Argentina
 
Embassy of Peru in Lima, Argentina
Av. Arequipa 121, Lima 1
 
CITY
Lima    
PHONE
(00 51 1) 433 3381 - 433 9966    
FAX
(00 51 1) 433 0769 - 330 0530
EMAIL
hni@mrecic.gov.ar
 
Peru
Peruvian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Peru in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av.del Libertador 1720, 1425 Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-4802-2000 ; +54-11-4802-2438    
FAX
+54-11-4802-2551
EMAIL
embperu@arnet.com.ar
 
Peru
Peruvian Consulate in Cyrdoba, Argentina
 
Consulate for the Republic of Peru in Cordoba, Argentina
Ayacucho 161, Centro, 5000
 
CITY
Cyrdoba          
PHONE
+54-351-4210266 ; +54-351-4258545      
FAX
+54-351-4258545
EMAIL
consulperucba@arnet.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
08.00-14.00
 
Peru
Peruvian Consulate in Corrientes, Argentina
 
Consulate for the Republic of Peru in Corrientes, Argentina
Calle Stgo. Baigorria NT 1873, Barrio Beron de Astrada, 3400
 
CITY
Corrientes        
PHONE
+54-3783-432-593         
FAX
+54-3783-432-790
 
Peru
Peruvian Consulate in La Plata, Argentina
 
Consulate for the Republic of Peru in La Plata , Argentina
Calle 8 NT. 862, 1er. Piso Entre 49 y 50, 1900
 
CITY
La Plata           
PHONE
+54-221-425-1862 ; +54-221-423-2812    
FAX
+54-221-425-1862 ; +54-221-423-2812
WEBSITE
http://www.conperlaplata.org.ar 
EMAIL
conperlp@speedy.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
08.00-14.00
 
Peru
Peruvian Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate for the Republic of Peru in Mendoza, Argentina
Calle Granaderos 998, 5ta. SecciCn, 5500
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
+54-261-423-2380         
FAX
+54-261-429-9831
EMAIL
cpmendoza@millic.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
09.00-14.00
 
Philippines
Filipino Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Philippines in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Lidoro Quinteros 1386, (C1428BXR)
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(5411) 4782-4752; 4786-7500; 4786-7666
FAX
(5411) 4788- 9692
WEBSITE
http://www.buenosairespe.com.ar          
EMAIL
pheba@fibertel.com.ar y pe.buenosaires@dfa.gov.ph
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m
DETAILS
H.E. (Mr.) REY A. CARANDANG Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary
 
Poland
Polish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Poland in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Alejandro Maria de Aguado 2870, 1425
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(0 054)(11) 4802 96 81 - 4802 96 82        
FAX
(0 054)(11) 4802 9683
WEBSITE
http://www.buenosaires.polemb.net/      
EMAIL
buenosaires.amb.sekretariat@msz.gov.pl
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Comodoro Rivadavia
Ingeniero Huergo No 1058 of. 1, 9000 Comodoro Rivadavia,, Chubut, Argentina, -
 
CITY
Comodoro Rivadavia    
PHONE
(00-54-297) 446-60-75 24           
FAX
(00-54-297) 455-73-37
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
ekoprowski@uolsinectis.com.ar
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Mar Del Plata, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Mar del Plata, Argentina
Rivadavia 2333, piso 9, dto. 931, cuerpo C, 7600 Mar del Plata , Argentina, -
 
CITY
Mar del Plata    
PHONE
(00-54-223) 491-52-94    
FAX
(00-54-223) 491-52-94
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
consulmdq@yahoo.com.ar
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Obera, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Obera, Argentina
Ucrania 734, 3360 Oberá, Misiones , Obera, Argentina, -
 
CITY
Obera  
PHONE
(00-54-3755) 403-733 24
FAX
(00-54-3755) 403-733 24
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
consulplobe@yahoo.com.ar
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Rosario, Argentina
Blvd. Oroño 275, 2000 Rosario, prov. Santa Fe , Argentina, -, -
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
(00-54-341) 425-25-29    
FAX
(00-54-341) 432-5555
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
bmoszoro@fibertel.com.ar
 
Portugal
Portuguese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Portugal in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Maipu 942 - 17 Piso, 1340 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(00 54 11) 4312 0187 - 4312 3524           
FAX
(00 54 11) 4311 2586
EMAIL
embpor@embajadaportugal.org.ar
 
Portugal
Portuguese Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate of Portugal in Mendoza, Argentina
Av. Portugal, n 1723, 5501 Godoy Cruz, Mendoza
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
(+54) 261 4228877 or (+54) 261 4524813
FAX
(+54) 261 4228877 or (+54) 261 4526611
EMAIL
consulh_portugal@yahoo.com.ar,rrgomes@yahoo.com.br
 
Romania
Romanian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Romania in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Calle Arroyo 962-970, Buenos Aires 1007
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(00) (54) (114) 3265888, (00) (54) (114) 3271584  
FAX
(00) (54) (114) 3222630
EMAIL
embarombue@rumania.org.ar
 
Russia
Russian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Russia in Buenos-Aires, Argentina
1021, Capital Federal, Rodrigues Pena 1741, Republica Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+ 54 11 4813-1552/8039
FAX
+54 11 4815-6293
WEBSITE
http://www.argentina.mid.ru       
EMAIL
embrusia@fibertel.com.ar
 
San Marino
Sammarinese Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate General of San Marino in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Parana 791 - 6th Floor - Dep. , 1017
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-4374-9057         
FAX
+ 54 - 11 - 43749057
WEBSITE
http://www.libertas.sm/About_San_Marino/FRelations/FR_Argentina.htm 
EMAIL
vivianagenari@serviciodigitalcba.com.ar
DETAILS
Provinces: Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Chubut, Corrientes, Entre Rios, La Pampa, Mendoza, Misiones, Neuquen, Rio Black, San Luis, Santa Fe, Santa Cruz, Tierra del Fuego.
 
San Marino
Sammarinese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Republic of San Marino
Avenida Posadas 1312, 1101
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 48151101        
FAX
(+54-11) 48120395
 
Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Saudi Arabia Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Alejandro M. de Aguado 2881 , 1425, Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54-11-48023375 / 54-11-48024303/+54-11-48020760        
FAX
+54-11-48061581
WEBSITE
http://www.mofa.gov.sa/sites/mofaen/SaudiMissionsAbroad/SaudiEmbassiesAbroad/Americas/Pages/EmbassyID40927.aspx           
EMAIL
aremb@mofa.gov.sa
OFFICE HOURS
From 9:00 a.m to 4:00 p.m
 
Serbia
Serbian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Serbia in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Marcelo T.de Alvear 1705, 1060
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-114)-8129133/+54-114-8133455/+54-114-8133456    
FAX
+54-11-48121070
EMAIL
yuembaires@ciudad.com.ar, snovak@ipm.net
 
Serbia
Serbian Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate of Serbia in Cordoba, Argentina
Avda. Santa Fe 1145, PO Box 500
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
+54-351-4713804          
FAX
(+54) 11 4812-1070
EMAIL
snovak@ipm.net ; yuembaires@ciudad.com.ar
 
Serbia
Serbian Consulate in Santa Fe, Argentina
 
Consulate of Serbia in Santa Fe, Argentina
Cordoba 665 - Piso 11 Of. A 2000
 
CITY
Santa Fe          
PHONE
+54-341-4245909
 
Serbia
Serbian Consulate in Chaco, Argentina
 
Consulate of Serbia in Chaco, Argentina
Pringles 714, 3700
 
CITY
Chaco  
PHONE
+54-3732-421330
 
Slovakia
Slovak Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Slovakia in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av. Figueroa Alcorta 3240, 1425
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 48013910 /+54-11-48013917/+54-11-48079451/+54-11-48048622/+54-11-48014654           
FAX
(+54-11) 4801464
WEBSITE
http://www.mzv.sk/buenosaires 
EMAIL
emb.buenosaires@mzv.sk
 
Slovakia
Slovak Consulate in La Plata, Argentina
 
Consulate of Slovakia in La Plata, Argentina
Calle 48 Nro. 535 Piso 2, 1900
 
CITY
La Plata           
PHONE
(+54-221) 48058888
 
Slovenia
Slovenian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Slovenia in Argentina
Avenida Santa Fe 846, 6 piso C1059ABP
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-48940621/+54-11-48940631/+54-11-43128418      
FAX
+54-11-43128410
EMAIL
vba@mzz-dkp.gov.si
 
Slovenia
Slovenian Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Slovenia Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Moreno 2763, 1752 Lom.del Mirador
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-44806709          
FAX
+54-11-44806710
EMAIL
zherman@interpack.com.ar
 
Slovenia
Slovenian Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Slovenia Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
Roberto Ortiz 1518 Villa Hipdromo , Godoy Gruz
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
+54-261-4271986          
FAX
+54-261-4271986
EMAIL
planinkasrl@speedy.com.ar
 
Slovenia
Slovenian Consulate in San Carlos De Bariloche, Argentina
 
Slovenia Consulate , Argentina
Mitre 124- Piso 6 B, 8400
 
CITY
San Carlos de Bariloche           
PHONE
+54-2944-428169          
FAX
+54-2944-428169
 
South Africa
South African Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
South African Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Avenida Marcelo T de Alvear 590, 8th Floor C1058AAF, Buenos Aires 1058
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+ 54 11 4317 2900        
FAX
+ 54 11 4317 2920; + 54 11 4317 2963; + 54 11 4317
WEBSITE
http://www.embajadasudafrica.org.ar/    
EMAIL
info.argentina@foreign.gov.za
 
South Africa
South African Consulate in Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina
 
South Africa Consulate in Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina
Casilla de Correo 50 , 9000
 
CITY
Comodoro Rivadavia    
PHONE
+54-297-4558692          
FAX
+54-297-4558692
 
Spain
Spanish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy Spain in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Guido 1760 - Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(11) 4811-0070  
FAX
(11) 4811-0079
WEBSITE
http://www.mae.es/consulados/buenosaires/
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Mendoza, Argentina
Agustin Alvarez, 455 , 5500
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
425 39 47, 425 84 83/459 09 15 y 459 09 16       
FAX
438 01 25
WEBSITE
http://www.mae.es/consulados/mendoza           
EMAIL
cog.mendoza@mae.es
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Cordoba, Argentina
Bulevar Chacabuco, 875.- 5000 Córdoba, 5000
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
54 351 469 74 90, 54 351 468 25 36, 54 351 468 13 57    
FAX
469 74 90, 468 25 36, 468 13 57
WEBSITE
http://www.mae.es/consulados/cordoba
EMAIL
cog.cordoba@mae.es
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Buenos Aires, Argentina
C/ Guido, 1770, 1016AAF- Buenos Aires
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54 11 4814 9100           
FAX
+54-11-48110079
WEBSITE
http://www.mae.es/consulados/buenosaires       
EMAIL
cog.buenosaires@mae.es, cg.buenos-aires@mae.es
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in White Bay, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in White Bay, Argentina
L.M. Dragon tree, 64/70 , 8000
 
CITY
White Bay        
PHONE
+54-291-4522549/ +54-291-4523347       
FAX
+54-11-48110079
EMAIL
cgesp.bahbl@correo.mae.es
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Rosario, Argentina
Santa Fe 768 - Casilla de Correo 485 , PO Box 485 , 2000
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
+54-341-4470100/+54-341-44922250/+54-341-155085094 
FAX
+54-341-4470200
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in San Luis, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in San Luis, Argentina
Av. España 1437 , 5700
 
CITY
San Luis          
PHONE
+54-2652-425309
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Paso De Los Libres, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Paso de los Libres, Argentina
C/Colon 614 , 3220
 
CITY
Paso de los Libres       
PHONE
+54-3772-421601          
FAX
+54-3772-426101
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Formosa, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Formosa, Argentina
Moreno 871, 3600
 
CITY
Formosa          
PHONE
+54-3717-431039          
FAX
+54-3717-431039
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Venado Tuerto, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Venado Tuerto, Argentina
Uruguay 904 , 2600
 
CITY
Venado Tuerto 
PHONE
+54-3462-424490          
FAX
+54-3462-424490
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Chivilcoy, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Chivilcoy, Argentina
Av. Sarmiento 121 , PO Box 136, 6620
 
CITY
Chivilcoy          
PHONE
+54-2346-423376
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Neuquen, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Neuquen, Argentina
Av. Argentina 245 - Piso 2 8300
 
CITY
Neuquen          
PHONE
+54-299-485328
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Puerto Iguazu, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Puerto Iguazu, Argentina
Av. V. Aguirre 354 , 3370
 
CITY
Puerto Iguazu   
PHONE
+54-3757-420862          
FAX
+54-3757-42154
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Resistencia, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Resistencia, Argentina
Av. Italia 1265, 3500
 
CITY
Resistencia      
PHONE
+54-3722-427222          
FAX
+54-3722-429978
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Tandil, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Tandil, Argentina
Av. Espana 683, 7000
 
CITY
Tandil  
PHONE
+54-2293-426129
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Tucuman, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Tucuman, Argentina
Av. Mate de Luna 4107, 4000
 
CITY
Tucuman          
PHONE
+54-381-4353042
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in La Plata, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in La Plata, Argentina
Calle 6 N 1030, 1900
 
CITY
La Plata           
PHONE
+54-221-4219286
EMAIL
viceconslp@speedy.com.ar
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Necochea, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Necochea, Argentina
Calle 57 N 1149
 
CITY
Necochea        
PHONE
+54-2262-424000
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in San Nicolas, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in San Nicolas, Argentina
Calle de la Nacion 31, 2900
 
CITY
San Nicolas     
PHONE
+54-3461-423133          
FAX
+54-3461-424448
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Parana, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Parana, Argentina
Corrientes 155 , 3100
 
CITY
Parana 
PHONE
+54-343-4312362          
FAX
+54-343-4234790
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Puerto Madryn, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Puerto Madryn, Argentina
España 335 o San Martín 720 , 9400
 
CITY
Puerto Madryn 
PHONE
+54-2965-471073          
FAX
+54-2965-1209
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Dolores, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Dolores, Argentina
General Pico 280, 7100
 
CITY
Dolores           
PHONE
+54-2245-446143
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Pergamino, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Pergamino, Argentina
General Paz 176, 2700
 
CITY
Pergamino       
PHONE
+54-2477-425753
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Reconquista, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Reconquista, Argentina
Habbeger 565, 3560
 
CITY
Reconquista     
PHONE
+54-3482-421286
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Mar Del Plata, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Mar del Plata, Argentina
Hipolito Yrigoyen 1657 , 7600
 
CITY
Mar del Plata    
PHONE
+54-223-4932006
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Gualeguaychu, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Gualeguaychu, Argentina
Luis N. Palma 963 , 2820
 
CITY
Gualeguaychu  
PHONE
+54-3446-427133
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Rafaela, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Rafaela, Argentina
Mitre 73, 2300
 
CITY
Rafaela
PHONE
+54-3492-42317
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in San Rafael, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in San Rafael, Argentina
Montecaseros 1080 , 5600
 
CITY
San Rafael       
PHONE
+54-2627-424421
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Santa Fe, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Santa Fe, Argentina
Necochea 3289, 3000
 
CITY
Santa Fe          
PHONE
+54-342-4529163          
FAX
+54-342-4557256
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Concordia, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Concordia, Argentina
Ramirez 131 , 3200
 
CITY
Concordia        
PHONE
+54-345-4216421
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in San Juan, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in San Juan, Argentina
Rivadavia 32 - Este, 5400
 
CITY
San Juan         
PHONE
+54-264-4225789
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Zarate, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Zarate, Argentina
San Martin 427 , 2800
 
CITY
Zarate  
PHONE
+54-3487-423794          
FAX
+54-3487-422130
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Corrientes, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Corrientes , Argentina
Salta N 857 , 3400
 
CITY
Corrientes        
PHONE
+54-3783-427396          
FAX
+54-3783-427396
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Rio Gallegos, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Rio Gallegos, Argentina
Av. Roca 866 - Piso 1' , PO Box 402, 9400
 
CITY
Rio Gallegos    
PHONE
+54-2966-422131/+54-2966-2740
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Tres Arroyos, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Tres Arroyos, Argentina
Avda. San Martin 464, 7500
 
CITY
Tres Arroyos    
PHONE
+54-2983-426832
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Santa Rosa, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Santa Rosa, Argentina
Cnel. Hilario Lagos 237, 6300
 
CITY
Santa Rosa      
PHONE
+54-2954-456935
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Rio Cuarto, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Rio Cuarto, Argentina
Fhoteringham 60 , 5800
 
CITY
Rio Cuarto       
PHONE
+54-358-4621909
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in La Rioja, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in La Rioja, Argentina
Joaquin V. Gonzalez 505 , 5300
 
CITY
La Rioja           
PHONE
+54-3822-426831
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Jujuy, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Jujuy, Argentina
Ramirez de Velasco 362 , 4600
 
CITY
Jujuy   
PHONE
+54-388-4228193
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Salta, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Salta, Argentina
Republica de Israel 13, 4400
 
CITY
Salta    
PHONE
+54-387-4312296
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Ayacucho, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Ayacucho, Argentina
San Martín 1225, 7150
 
CITY
Ayacucho        
PHONE
+54-2296-454388
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Catamarca, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in Catamarca, Argentina
Salta 570 , 4700
 
CITY
Catamarca       
PHONE
+54-3833-435356
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in San Carlos De Bariloche, Argentina
 
Consulate of Spain in San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina
Sargento Rolando 218 - Piso 1 , 8400
 
CITY
San Carlos de Bariloche           
PHONE
+54-2944-422975
 
Sweden
Swedish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Sweden, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tacuari 147, piso 6, 1071 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54 (11) 43290800        
FAX
+54 (11) 43421697
WEBSITE
http://www.swedenabroad.com/buenosaires      
EMAIL
ambassaden.buenos-aires@foreign.ministry.se
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 10 a.m. to 12 noon
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Cordoba
Bv. Chacabuco 1160, piso 10, Cordoba, Argentina
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
+54 (351) 4208200        
FAX
+54 (351) 4208336
EMAIL
mbperez@arcor.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Obera, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Obera
9 Julio 876 piso 2 'B', 3360 Obera, Argentina
 
CITY
Obera  
PHONE
+54 (3755) 42 18 98      
FAX
+54 (3755) 42 18 98
EMAIL
consuladodesuecia@hotmail.com
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in San Miguel De Tucuman, Argentina
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, San Miguel de Tucuman
Avenida Islas Malvinas, Ruta provincial 302, Km 11, 4184 Colombres, Dep. Cruz Alta Tucuman, Argentina
 
CITY
San Miguel de Tucuman
PHONE
+54 (381) 450 90 00      
FAX
+54 (381) 450 90 01
EMAIL
marta.villegas@scania.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Wednesday 2 to 5.15 p.m.
 
Switzerland
Swiss Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Switzerland in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Avenida Santa Fe 846, 10 piso, Apartado 76, Sucursal 69, Pza San Martín, C1059ABP Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(0054 11) 4311-6491      
FAX
(0054 11) 4313-2998
WEBSITE
http://www.eda.admin.ch/buenosaires    
EMAIL
Vertretung@bue.rep.admin.ch
OFFICE HOURS
09.00-12.00
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Argentina
Av. Colon 184, 1ro Piso, Esc. 6
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
(+54-35) 14232176        
FAX
(+54-35) 14230463
EMAIL
risler@onenet.com.ar
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Ruiz De Montoya, Argentina
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Argentina
c/o Inst. Linea Cuchilla, 3334 Ruiz de Montoya, Misiones
 
CITY
Ruiz de Montoya          
PHONE
(+54-37) 43495015        
FAX
(+54-37) 43495076
EMAIL
iesilcuchilla@prico.com.ar
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Eldorado, Argentina
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Argentina
Calle Kennedy 67, 3380 Eldorado, Misiones
 
CITY
Eldorado         
PHONE
(+54-37) 51421325        
FAX
(+54-37) 51421325
EMAIL
consulado@telemisiones.net
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Argentina
Tucuman 8364 esq. Ezeiza - Fisherton
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
(+54-34) 14514444        
FAX
(+54-34) 14514444
EMAIL
mjmartin@sinectis.com.ar
 
Syria
Syrian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of the Syrian Arab Republic
Avenida Callao 956, 1023 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(54 11) 4813-2113 / (54 11) 4813-5438    
FAX
(54 11) 4814-3211
EMAIL
embanic@overnet.com.ar
 
Taiwan
Taiwanese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Argentina
Av. de Mayo 654, Piso 4, 1084, Capital Federal
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(002-54-11) 52182600
Emergency tel: (002-54-9-11)56162947   
FAX
(002-54-11)5218-2625
WEBSITE
http://www.taiwanembassy.org  
EMAIL
taipei@elsitio.net
OFFICE HOURS
Opening hours: Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 1: 00 p.m. and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
 
Thailand
Thai Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Thailand in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Vuelta de Obligado 1947 -Piso 12 , Capital Federal, Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-47744415/ +54-11-47721170       
FAX
+54-11-47732447
WEBSITE
http://www.thaiembargen.org/    
EMAIL
thaiembargen@fibertel.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
08:30 - 12:30 and 14:00 - 16:30
 
Tunisia
Tunisian Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Tunisia in Argentina
Ciudad de la Paz 3086/88
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-45442618 / +54-11-45455149      
FAX
+54-11-45456369
EMAIL
atbuenosaires@infovia.com.ar
 
Turkey
Turkish Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Turkey in Argentina
11 de Septiembre 1382
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-47857203 / +54-11-47883239      
FAX
+54-11-47849179
EMAIL
Turkemb.buenosaires@mfa.gov.tr
 
Uganda
Ugandan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Uganda in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Esmeralda 1394 2DO A
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-1544044656
EMAIL
ugandaconsulbue@yahoo.com
 
Uganda
Ugandan Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uganda in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av.da Santa 1460-4 to Oiso
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54-11-48153156
 
Ukraine
Ukrainian Embassy in Buenos, Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Ukraine in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Belgrano , (Subte Jose Hernandes, linea
 
CITY
Buenos, Aires  
PHONE
(+54) 11-4552-0657/ 4552-5334  
FAX
(54) 11-4552-6771
WEBSITE
http://www.embucra.com.ar/      
EMAIL
embucra@embucra.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
09.00-13.00 and 15.00-18.00
 
Ukraine
Ukrainian Consulate in Obera, Argentina
 
Consulate of Ukraine in Obera, Argentina
Gobernador Barreiro 730
 
CITY
Obera  
PHONE
+54-3755-409326
EMAIL
conucramis@arnet.com.ar
 
United Kingdom
British Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
British Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Dr. Luis Agote 2412, (1425) Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
+54 11 4808-2200         
FAX
(54) (11) 4808 2274 General
WEBSITE
http://ukinargentina.fco.gov.uk/en/about-us/our-embassy/contact-us/     
EMAIL
askinformation.baires@fco.gov.uk
OFFICE HOURS
March-December: Monday - Thursday: 8:45 - 17:30, Friday: 8:45 - 14:00 Summer Hours: (January & February) Monday - Thursday: 8:45 - 14:30, Friday: 8:45 - 14:00
Opening Hours for Consular and Entry Clearance (Visa) Applications: Winter Hours 9:00 - 13:00, Summer Hours: 9:00 0 12:00
DETAILS
GMT: Mar-Dec: Mon-Thurs: 1145-2030 Fri: 1145-1700 Jan-Feb: Mon-Thurs: 1145-1730 Fri: 1145-1700 Local Time: Mar-Dec: Mon-Thurs: 0845-1730 Fri: 0845-1400 Jan-Feb Mon-Thurs: 0845-1430 Fri: 0845-1400
 
United States
American Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of United States in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Avda. Colombia 4300, (C1425GMN) Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
54-11-5777-4533           
FAX
54-11-5777-4240
WEBSITE
http://argentina.usembassy.gov/           
EMAIL
BuenosAires-ACS@state.gov
OFFICE HOURS
08.45-17.45
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Uruguay in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Av. Las Heras 1907/P.15, 1127, Capital Federal
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(00 54 11) 4807 3040     
FAX
(005411) 4807 3050
WEBSITE
http://www.embajadadeluruguay.com.ar 
EMAIL
urubaires@embajadadeluruguay.com.ar
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
Av. Las Heras 1907 - Piso 4
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54-11) 48073045        
FAX
(+54-11) 48073045
EMAIL
conuruarge@embajadadeluruguay.com.ar
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Salta, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
Av. Belgrano 663
 
CITY
Salta    
PHONE
(+54-387) 4311513        
FAX
(+54-387) 4311435
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Mendoza, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
Ituzaingo 1422
 
CITY
Mendoza          
PHONE
(+54-261) 4259877        
FAX
(+54-261) 4299156
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Concordia, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
Pellegrini 709 - Piso 1 C
 
CITY
Concordia        
PHONE
(+54-3459) 4210380      
FAX
(+54-3459) 4210380
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Neuqu N, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
Pte. Julio A. Roca 1330
 
CITY
Neuqu n           
PHONE
(+54-299) 4427079        
FAX
(+54-299) 4427079
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Gualeguaych, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
Rivadavia 510
 
CITY
Gualeguaych    
PHONE
(+54-3446) 426168        
FAX
(+54-3446) 433828
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Rosario, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
Rioja 1037, 7 piso
 
CITY
Rosario
PHONE
(+54-341) 4246860, 4219077      
FAX
(+54-341) 4494098
EMAIL
conururo@cablenet.com.ar
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Colon, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
San Martin 417
 
CITY
Colon  
PHONE
(+54-3447) 421999        
FAX
(+54-3447) 422825
EMAIL
crou@editcom.com.ar
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Cordoba, Argentina
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Argentina
San Jeronimo 167, 7? Of. A, CP 5000 Ed. St. Michel
 
CITY
Cordoba          
PHONE
(+54-351) 4241028, 4225058      
FAX
(+54-351) 4225058
EMAIL
conurucor@arnet.com.ar
 
Venezuela
Venezuelan Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Venezuela in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Virrey Loreto 2035, Barrio Belgrano, 1426 Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) (11) 4788 4944     
FAX
(+54) (11) 4784 4311
EMAIL
embaven@arnet.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
09:00 - 18:00
 
Vietnam
Vietnamese Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina
 
Embassy of Vietnam in Buenos Aires, Argentina
Calle 11 de Septiembre 1442, C.P. 1426 Buenos Aires, Capital Federal Argentina
 
CITY
Buenos Aires   
PHONE
(+54) 11 4783 1802 / 4783 1825 
FAX
(+54) 11 4728 0078
EMAIL
sqvnartn@fibertel.com.ar
OFFICE HOURS
10.00-12.00 and 14:00-16:00

Phone Lines

There are currently over 9 million land lines and 50 million mobile phones active in the country, connected via a domestic satellite system with 40 earth stations. The country makes around 1.7 billion calls a month, 1.3 billion of which are local. The main companies in the region are the Spanish-owned Telefonica, the Italian-owned Telecom Argentina and several other smaller groups.

Internet

Around 33%, or 27 million members, of the population are online on 12 million PCs and there are around 1.7 million domain names registered as well as over 6 million Internet Hosts. Once only dial-up, nowadays most users are on Broadband connections and several ISPs, such as Arnet and Flash, exist. The country’s top level domain is .ar. It should be mentioned that the courts in Argentina routinely block websites which are illegal or controversial, these are often in attempts to improve public safety (such as blocking child pornography) but also censors websites and blogs exposing corruption in the Argentinian government or judicial organizations.

Communications

There are over 1400 radio stations in Argentina, around 260 of which are AM and the remaining are FM. The stations are very western in style and may opt for focuses on news, debates and sports. Amateur radio is very popular and widespread in the country as well.

Argentina’s TV stations are numerous (over 40) but there are five major networks, each capital having at least one local station, with the highest accessibility rates of South America. There are roughly 12.5 million TV sets owned in Argentina. 

Weather & Climate

Argentina sees a variety of climate types due to its large size combined with a single sea front coastline. The climate types can be broken up best into North-East, North-West, South-West, South-East and Central South regions.

The North-Eastern regions of Argentina tend to veer towards a sub-tropical weather system and in some areas, temperatures can reach as high as 35 degrees Centigrade (95 Fahrenheit) while other areas can be as cool as 0 degrees Centigrade (32 Fahrenheit). Rainfall can vary over the course of the year but tends to be very high, with the region getting as much as 1800mm of rainfall a year.

The North-West has warm weather as well and may see temperatures rising up to 35 degrees Centigrade (95 Fahrenheit) in the summer (sometimes even topping 45 degrees Centigrade or 113 Fahrenheit) and dropping as low as -8 degrees Centigrade (17.6 Fahrenheit) in the winter. Rainfall is plentiful despite the hot conditions though and up to 1200mm of rain may fall annually.

The South-Western regions have a much more arid climate and may receive less than 200mm of rainfall a year while temperatures may soar up as high as 45 degrees Centigrade (113 Fahrenheit). Conversely, temperatures in some areas (mainly at higher altitudes) may drop as low as -20 degrees Centigrade (-4 Fahrenheit) and may receive in excess of 1000mm of rain annually.

South-Eastern regions have longer summers than the other regions but can also see over 1200mm of rain annually. Temperatures are comparable to European countries, rising up as high as 32 degrees Centigrade (89.6 Fahrenheit) in the summer and dropping as low as -5 degrees Centigrade (23 Fahrenheit) in the winter.

Meanwhile in Central-South regions, temperatures are typically much colder than the rest of Argentina as one would expect, falling down sometimes as low as -35 degrees Centigrade (-31 Fahrenheit) and rarely rising up above 30 degrees Centigrade (86 Fahrenheit) even in the height of summer. Precipitation is additionally high, with up to 4000mm a year, albeit most of this falling as snow in the colder areas of the region.


Holidays

The Lao Lao Resort & Spa is located ideally in Bariloche and features beautiful views of the Andes Mountain Range and lakes Moreno & Nahuel Huapi right from your windowsill. Guests have exclusive access to the marina, fitness centre, swimming pools, an 18-hole golf course, a modern spa and a beach.
Meanwhile in the Peninsula Valdez, the Estancia Rincon Chico has a much more rustic design and offers a clean-cut back-to-nature type experience. Each room features on-suite bathrooms with a tub as well as double or twin beds and guests may experience the nearby marine wildlife centre.

In the Iguazu National Park right in viewing distance from the falls you’ll find the park’s only hotel: the Sheraton Iguazu Resort & Spa. The Resort is set in the middle of the tropical jungle paradise for a true deep-nature experience and visitors have access to the spa, swimming pool, bar, restaurant and the park itself.
Just outside of the park but still inside of Iguazu, the Panoramic Hotel finds itself surrounded by beautiful gardens as well as the local Iguazu River. The hotel is actually situated on a site at the dividing line between Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil and inhabitants have views of the river itself and the falls nearby while they enjoy a cold drink at the bar or a dip in the pool.

The Emperador Hotel is located in Buenos Aires, the capital city of Argentina, and is located in the exquisitely elegant Recoleta district. Guests may experience the hotel’s top-quality spa and heated pools before nipping back to their room to gain access to their own minibar, TV, bathroom and Wi-Fi. 

Children do not require any additional documents or measures to enter a country that an adult would not require.

All dogs and cats will require the following:

  • A rabies vaccination at least 30 days before, but not more than 12 months, to entry
  • A Veterinary Certificate for Argentina signed and completed by a USDA or CFIA accredited veterinarian
  • A copy of the rabies certificate
  • A health certificate issued within 10 days of travel
It should be noted that the airline must notify the station manager at the point of entry and will be examined at the point of entry in Argentina. A $25 customs fee will apply.

Although it’s not enforced, it’s recommended that you microchip your cat or dog prior to travelling. 

There are three main levels of education in Argentina, these include Primary, Secondary and Higher Education.

Primary School students begin at the age of 6 and will complete grades one through six before graduating and moving into Secondary School.

Secondary School is broken up into two parts, Years 1 to 3 (Ciclo Basico) and Years 4 to 6 (Ciclo Orientado). The first three years tend to use the same subjects used across the school system, while the second three years may vary and include subjects such as Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, Sport, Arts, Dance, Design and more. An extra year is available in some schools which grant a professional title in a specialized field such as Electricity, Construction, Mechanics, Agriculture and more.

Higher education is offered in the form of Tertiary Education level degrees lasting between 1 and 3 years, University level degrees lasting from 4 to 6 years and Post-graduate level degrees lasting 1 to 3 years. All public universities offer these three types and are completely tuition-fee free and open to anyone, but it’s important to note that transportation and material costs often have to be paid by students. 

Typically all applicants for positions in Argentina will require a Masters or Bachelor’s Degree in Education or in a subject relevant to their field of teaching as well as a Teaching Qualification. Applicants will additionally require at least two years of experience teaching and must be native speakers of English and be trained in a Western Country (US, UK, Canada, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or South Africa).

It should be noted that although TEFL and similar certifications are not considered to be full teaching qualifications on their own, having one in addition to a teaching qualification will vastly improve your chances of being placed. Candidates with international experience may also have increased chances of being placed. 

Always ensure to check our article on Visa and Work Permit Restrictions

Prices are comparable to western countries with a meal in a restaurant setting you back around ARS 81 ($10 or £5.80), a litre of water costing around ARS 7.30 ($0.90 or £0.50), a litre of milk costing about ARS 11 ($1.30 or £0.80), 500g of bread costing ARS 13 ($1.60 or £0.90) and 12 eggs setting you back ARS 19 ($2.30 or £1.30).

Luxuries are equally comparable, with a pack of cigarettes costing ARS 16 ($2 or £1.20), a litre of beer costing about ARS 26 ($3.20 or £1.90) and a bottle of mid-range wine costing ARS 47 ($5.80 or £3.40).

However, rent is far cheaper, with a 1 bedroom apartment in the city centre costing ARS 3600 ($440 or £260), outside the city centre it costs a bit less at ARS 2800 ($350 or £200). Meanwhile a 3 bedroom apartment outside the city costs around ARS 5300 ($650 or £380) and inside the city centre you’d be looking more at ARS 7100 ($870 or £510). 

If you like feeling the waves beneath your feet and the ocean breeze on your skin, then you’ll love the Yacht Club Argentino in Buenos Aires. The club takes on individuals of all skill calibres and regularly organizes sailing events and opportunities.

Known as Club Atletico Belgrano, Belgrano Football Club was founded over a hundred years ago and takes its colours from Argentina’s flag. The club has won the Cordoba league three times in a row, the Federacion Cordobesa de Futbol’s championship as well as many others, basing their home in El Gigante stadium.

If you’re looking to learn some new dance moves and burn off some excess energy, the Salsa Dance Courses in Buenos Aires is for you! The courses are led by several private dancer tutors of Cuban origins whom allow you to tailor your programme to match your level of expertise and schedule accordingly.

How about a round of Golf? If you’re aiming for that elusive hole-in-one or are aiming to down a birdie before lunch, the Chapelco Golf Resort may just be able to accommodate you! The club caters for players of all skill levels and has been built to USGA standards, designed by Jack Nicklaus and his son while incorporating an awe-inspiring view of the Andes Mountain Range that surrounds the club.

La Providencia Resort & Country Club is for those with high-class tastes and offers an incredibly sociable community focused around golf, polo, watersports (both motorised and non) as well as general village society. No matter who you are, we’re sure you’ll feel welcome in La Providencia Resort & Country Club. 

The country’s biggest issues are in Gang-related Activity, Human Trafficking, Terrorism and Corruption.

Human Trafficking is incredibly high with crimes related to this activity rated as the third highest in the world. The crime is punishable by law and typically sees penalties between 3 and 15 years in prison. The majority of victims are from other surrounding South American countries including Bolivia, Paraguay, the Dominican Republic, Peru, Colombia and Uruguay as well as Argentina itself.

Terrorism and Gang-related Activity often go hand in hand and are the result of the fallout after the various oppressive military regimes in the 70s and 80s, these are often brought about by the remnants of activist groups turned guerrilla militia forces.

The country’s corrupt roots lie, again, back in the days of the oppressive military regimes, and sadly have not changed all that much. To this day there is corruption involved with government forces through money laundering, ties with the drug cartels and police brutality and bribery.

Emergency Numbers

  • Police – 101
  • Ambulance – 107
  • Fire – 100