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About

Known officially as the Republic of Colombia, the republic is run under a presidency under President Juan Manuel Santos and Vice President Angelino Garzon. It is home to over 47 Million people and covers over 1.1 Million square kilometres of land.

The country shares borders with Panama in the northwest, Venezuela on the east, and Brazil, Peru and Ecuador on the south. It also has two ocean borders on the Pacific and Caribbean seas.


Stone Age History

Colombia’s history can be traced as far back as 43,000 BC, but it was in 10,000 BC where evidence of hunter-gatherer societies near present-day Tibito in Bogota existed that is considered the dawn of Colombian civilization. Around 9,000 BC, the hunter-gatherers had become concentrated around the highlands of Colombia.

Bronze Age History

By 2,000 BC, the hunter-gatherer societies in the highlands had formed a permanent village settlement in northern Colombia and had split into three main groups; the Quimbayas whom had begun to occupy the western slopes of the Cordillera Central, the Caribes whom lived around the borders in the northwest between Colombia and Venezuela and the Chibhas whom had settled in the eastern areas of Colombia.

Iron Age History

Towards the end of the 3rd Century BC, the Chibcha had split into two tribes: the Tairona whom settled in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta and the Muisca whom had taken over their predecessor’s lands in the Cordillera Oriental in the eastern ranges of Colombia. Both tribes spoke dialects of the Chibcha language and both had advanced their civilizations significantly through deforestation and the use of cultigens.

The Quimbaya, meanwhile, had developed a spectacularly masterful level of skill with goldsmithing and had constructed various gold items including statuettes, storage containers, sarcophagi, fruits and other rarities. One of the most interesting being the Quimbaya airplanes which are supposed to depict birds, amphibians, fish and the like, but curiously resemble modern aircraft.

Despite these technological and skill-based advances, the Carib had rapidly become warlike and held regular raids on other groups nearby. The Carib also begun to spread to nearby islands in the Caribbean and had raided Arawakan groups in the region, fully exterminating and assimilating the Taino tribes completely. However, it is known that they co-existed fairly peacefully with another tribe, the Galibi, for most of their occupation of the area.

1st Century – 15th Century History

The various civilizations continued to thrive, with the Quimbaya reaching their peak between the 4th and the 7th Centuries AD. Then in the 10th Century AD, the Quimbaya vanished mysteriously, leaving only their structures and golden items behind. Even the Quimbayan language vanished in its entirety.


16th Century – 19th Century History

The Spanish arrived at the Cabo de la Vela in 1499 and from that moment on; they made repeated attempts to establish a settlement along the northern coast, but only succeeded some 26 years later on the grounds of Santa Marta. Cartagena, the next settlement, was established in 1533, and due to its close proximity to the Sinu civilization, a Muisca tribe nearby, one of the locals observed the Sinu Zipa’s (the ruler) tradition where the Zipa would cover himself in gold, float out to the middle of Lake Guatavita on a large regal raft and offer gold trinkets to the goddess of the lake. This combined with the golden remnants of the disappeared Quimbayan civilization is what started the legend of El Dorado and caused a rush of colonialists to the country. In 1549, the Spanish Royal Audiencia gave Bogota the status of the capital of New Granada (which is what comprised most of Colombia today).

Almost two hundred years later in 1717, New Granada became a Viceroyalty, which was temporarily removed and then re-established in 1739 with Santa Fe de Bogota as its capital city. The Viceroyalty also gave the country control over neighbouring Venezuela, Ecuador and Panama and gave the Spanish access to northern South America and Latin America through nearby Mexico City and Lima.

In 1810, news that southern Spain had been conquered by Napoleon and that the Spanish Supreme Central Junta had dissolved reached the Viceroyalty of New Grenada as well as the nearby Viceroyalty of Venezuela and the countries began to set up their own juntas to compensate, essentially claiming independence. However, these caused rapid successive shifts in power as leaders were repeatedly ousted and replaced, starting with Viceroy Antonio Jose Amar y Borbon of Bogota being deposed by popular pressure only five days after the establishment of the junta in Bogota. After Borbon’s deposition, arguments over the successor broke out and after mob protesting and repeated arrests. The region splintered apart and saw widespread military intervention on repeated occasions.

Following this in 1811, Bogota transformed itself into the state of Cundinamarca and developed a constitution, establishing it as a monarchy under the absent Ferdinand VII of Spain. It attempted to start the “Congress of the United Provinces” and invited other nearby nations to try to start a confederation. This Congress established the United Provinces of New Granada later on that year, but Cundinamarca itself rejected the union and declared independence from the union. Many other regions of New Granada also split off and formed their own kingdoms, governments and confederations. However, the disputes didn’t settle and erupted into civil wars in 1812 and 1814, by 1816, the state of Cundinamarca was forced to submit to the union after losing the war and its capital, Bogota.

The conflicts had generated two distinctive political parties, the Conservative and the Liberal parties, and these two parties began to dominate Colombian politics. The Conservative party wanted a more centralized government while the Liberals wanted a decentralized government. The parties began to hold presidency for roughly equal amounts of time and held regular free elections. After Great Colombia was dissolved in 1830, the military was forced to intervene to stop rioting, and then it was forced to take control once more in 1854, however, within one year the military returned rule to civilian control within one year. In 1863, the country became the United States of Colombia and in 1886 it became the Republic of Colombia that we see today. Due to the rivalry between the Conservative and Liberal parties, civil war erupted in 1899, culminating in the loss of over 100,000 lives.


20th Century History

Riots and warring between the Conservative and Liberal parties continued into the 20th Century, and the United States’ intervention further fuelled the fire as they attempted to influence the area with the construction of the Panama Canal in 1903 and subsequently ended up with Panama declaring independence as a nation. A further 300 thousand people died in the 40s and 50s during the violence between the ruling parties. In 1953, the military was forced to intervene again and they successfully performed a coup d’état, ousting Conservative President Laureano Gomez and instating General Gustavo Rojas as ruler, and although enjoying quick support to begin with, he was overthrown himself by the military and both political parties in 1957 when he failed to restore democratic rule and openly repressed the people.

In 1957, Laureano Gomez and Liberal President Alberto Lleras issused the Declaration of Sitges which proposed the joining of the two parties, allowing them to jointly govern the nation in what they called the National Front. The new government began rapidly reform the country’s law, in particular, that surrounding land entitlement, within the years between 1968 and 1969 alone the Colombian Institute for Agrarian Reform set up by Alberto Lleras Camargo issued over 60 thousand land titles to farmers and workers. However, the National Front system began to be seen as a form of political repression, especially after the fraud committed by Conservative candidate Misael Pastrana in 1970. This fraudulence caused the creation of the guerrilla group M-19 (19th April Movement / Movimiento 19 de Abril) as a response. The National front was phased out in 1974.

For the next eight years leading up to 1982, each presidential group attempted to end the insurgencies trying to undermine the political system in the country. Both parties repeatedly claimed to support the weak and poor castes against the more powerful and richer classes in the country and had a somewhat Communist perspective on the matter. The insurgent groups, M-19, FARC and ELN (National Liberation Army) being the biggest, had grown significantly and found popular support with many people, resulting in harsher measures by the government in an attempt to further supress the militant groups.

At the same time, the illegal drug trade had become a big problem in the country and Colombian drug lords had begun to hold significant power in the region and developed an uneven relationship with the guerrilla groups. This led to the kidnapping of family members of the drug cartels and the subsequent forming of the MAS (Muerte a Seceuestradores / Death to Kidnappers), an assassin group. The MAS began to take measures to move through the government to push legislation attempting to stop the extradition of Colombian nationals to the US Victims of Cartel Violence. These measures were extreme and included the bribery and murders of various politicians. Despite a negotiated cease-fire with the M-19, it failed when the factions resumed fighting in 1985 after the guerrillas claimed that official security forces had assaulted and threatened their members. In the same year, the M-19 stormed the Colombian Palace of Justice and held the Supreme Court Magistrates hostage in an attempt to put President Betancur on trial, resulting in a bloody crossfire.

Meanwhile the FARC guerrilla forces and the UP Political Party had attempted to join together, but tensions rose when the FARC refused to disarm and demobilize. The government also accused the FARC of continuing to recruit for their guerrilla forces as well as kidnapping, extorting and politically intimidating voters of the UP. In 1986, Virgilio Barco came into power and further attempted to negotiate with the guerrilla forces and to confront the drug cartels. The UP at this time suffered more losses through assassinations by the drug cartels and the guerrilla forces and further assassinations followed until 1990 when Cesar Gaviria was elected.

In 1991 the elections for a Constituent Assembly of Colombia wrote a new constitution and fairly successfully were able to pacify the guerrilla groups. The new Constitution brought in various reforms which were seen as far more modern and democratic than the prior 1886 Constitution. In 1994, Liberal Ernesto Samper came into office and he turned the government’s eyes to the narcotics traffickers which, although somewhat successful, had pulled the focus away from domestic reforms and once again began to see guerrilla violence and hostage-taking of both political and military officials. He was replaced in 1998 by Conservative Andres Pastrana whom won in one of the first elections with a high voter turnout and low political unrest and saw a new presidential campaign which focused on collaboration with the US Government to combat the illegal drug trade.

Although the Colombian peace process was fairly successful in the coming years, the Pastrana presidency also saw unemployment rates soar up above 20% due to a string of economic problems and little support by the government. Additionally, although smaller in scale, the various cartels and guerrilla groups became more diverse in nature and became rapidly harder to combat. Although the ELN and FARC groups agreed to participate in the peace process, they didn’t actually agree directly to end the conflict and guerrilla attacks by the groups have continued to occur regardless. These problems continued on and forced the hand of the president, unveiling the ‘Plan Colombia’ in 1999 which attempted to deal with the limited government presence, the frequent violence, the illicit drug trade and social inequities in general. The US approved $1.3 Billion in an assistance package to Colombia in hopes of helping their government revive their economy and combat the narcotics trade.

21st Century History

Peace negotiations rapidly began to crumble and in 2002, Liberal politician Alvaro Uribe was sworn in as president. Uribe’s father had been killed by left-wing guerrillas and as such he quickly took action to try and crush the FARC, including employing civilians controversially to act as informants to the police and armed forces. Later on in the same year, the Democratic Security and Defence Policy came into play, this saw more attention focused on the national security and armed forces of Colombia.

By 2004 it had become apparent that the situation inside of Colombia had improved somewhat and that the economy had also seen a slight boost, but a lot still has yet to be done and this is mainly due to the lack of freely allocated funds and credits in the country. Additionally, despite Uribe’s policies against crime and guerrilla activity being relatively successful (and subsequently seeing the title of World’s Biggest Cocaine Producer being lost by Colombia), it’s been noted that they also breach human rights significantly and have given the armed security forces too much power, resulting in its abuse.

Uribe was re-elected in 2006 after the constitution was changed to allow prior-presidents to be re-elected.

In 2008 through demonstrations by millions of Colombians against the FARC and ELN, the two groups rapidly began to demobilize and the military forces of the Republic of Colombia have subsequently been strengthened.

Columbia managed to take the title of the 3rd Largest Oil Producer in South America and produced over a million barrels a day. Since 2012, Peace Process talks in Cuba between the Colombian government and Rebel groups (especially the FARC-EP) have taken place and huge breakthroughs have been accomplished recently as a result. In 2013, the National Administrative Department of Statistics reported that over 30% of the country’s population had been living below the poverty line, 9% of which had been lifted out of extreme poverty (amounting to about 820,000 in number). 

Wording
Phonetic
English
     
Hola Holl-ah Hello/Hi
Adios Ah-dee-oss Good Bye!
Habla usted Ingles / Espanol Hah-blah oo-stead In-gulls / Ess-span-yoll Do you speak English / Spanish?
Mi nombre es… Mee nom-breh ess My name is…
Me pueden ayudar? Meh pweh-dehn ah-yoo-dah Can you help me?
Estoy buscando… Ess-toy boos-can-doh I’m looking for…
Si / No See / Noh Yes / No
Gracias Grah-see-as Mr / Mrs / Miss
Hoy / Ahora Hoi / Ah-hoar-ah Today / Now
Hoi / Ah-hoar-ah Mah-nar-nar / Aay-err Tomorrow / Yesterday
Este / Que / Aqui / Hay Ess-tey / Kay / Ah-kee / Haay This / That / Here / There

Phrases

Above are a few common Spanish phrases to help you get around.

Languages

Over 99% of the population speaks the Spanish Castilian dialect due to its majorly Spanish roots back in the 16th Century. However, it should be noted that over 65 Amerindian languages (of which around 850 thousand people are speakers), 2 Creole languages and the Romani language are also frequently spoken within the country with a grand total of over a hundred different languages being used within the country’s borders. Native languages include Chibchan, Cariban, Tupian, Arhuaco, Quechuan, Choco, Saliba, Witoto, Tucano, Guahibo, Macu, Bora, Andoque, Cofan, Kamentsa, Ticuna, Yagua, Awa-Cuaiquer, Guambiano, Paez, Tinigua and Yaruro.

Religion

In 1991, the new Colombian Constitution guaranteed the freedom of all faiths through Acts 13 and 19, but due to history the country is mainly Catholic with around 82% of all Colombian inhabitants following the faith. A further 13% or so are Protestant Christians, making around 95% of the population Christian in nature.

However, many other faiths exist in the country with 2% being Atheist and 3% following other faiths including Seventh-Day Adventism (1%), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (0.8%), Jehovah’s Witnesses (0.7%), the Baha’i Faith (0.4%), Judaism (0.05%), Buddhism (0.05%), Islam (0.02%) and Taoism (0.01%). Some native beliefs do also exist but these are largely isolated communities.

Museums, Galleries & Architecture

Architecture in Colombia is more often than not derived from European Colonial buildings, especially Spanish Andalusian and are very frequently gothic in nature as is visible in Las Lajas Cathedral, Rafael Uribe Uribe Palace of Culture and in many areas of Bogota and Medellin. However, recent years have also seen many Neoclassical buildings, those of the Mudejar variety and even some Art Deco structures such as the Romelio Martinez Stadium and the Garcia Building in Barranquilla.



Clothing, Dress Style & Etiquette

Today, most Colombians wear typical western-style clothing with those in the city centres veering towards dark-coloured suits and those in the suburbs preferring loose shirt, skirts and trousers. However, traditionally the clothing worn varied greatly and traditional outfits can still be seen during national festivals such as the Carnaval de Barranquilla.

Women often wear La Pollera Colora (a brightly coloured skirt with ruffles and lace around the neck and knee lines) and Men will wear something similar with more of an emphasis on fitted trousers and shirts (with the aforementioned ruffles and lace at the openings). Common Colombian clothing pieces worn by both genders include the Sombrero (a wide-brimmed hat) and the Ruana (a poncho-like cape).

Literature, Poetry, Music & Dance

Colombian music sees a unique blend of European Spanish Guitar with percussion instruments and large gaita flutes seen in the indigenous population but also sees its percussion structure and dance forms coming from Africa. These influences have seen many unique genres rise to fame including the Cumbria, Joropo, Vallenato, Salsa and Bambuco. Additionally, rock, pop and classical music are also widely popular and have seen many artists find international stardom including Shakira (Shakira Isabel Mebarak Ripoll) and Juanes (Juan Esteban Aristizabal Vasquez).

Calendar & Events

Throughout the year, Colombia has over a hundred festivals which differ greatly from region to region and town to town, however, across the country a fair few days are celebrated across the board.

In January, Ano Nuevo (New Years’ Day) and Dia de los Reyes Magos (the Epiphany) are celebrated on the 1st and the 6th respectively. Then March sees Dia de San Jose (Saint Joseph’s Day) on the 19th and one or both of Jueves Santo (Maundy Thursday) and Viernes Santo (Good Friday) in late March or Early April.
May 1st sees Primero de Mayo (Labour Day) celebrated, and then the Ascension del Senor (Ascension of Jesus) celebrated 39 days after Easter Sunday, which lands some time usually in May. June sees Corpus Christi (Body of Christ) and the Sagrado Corazon (Sacred Heart) celebrated 60 and 68 days after Easter Sunday, respectively, as well as the days of San Pedro y San Pablo (Saint Peter and Saint Paul) celebrated simultaneously on the 29th.

On July 20th, the Declaration of Independence is celebrated with another public holiday, followed by the Battle of Boyaca on August 7th and La Asuncion (Assumption of Mary) on August 15th.

The last quarter of the year sees the Dia de la Raza (Colombus Day) celebrated on the 12th of October, followed by All Saints’ Day on November 1st, the Independence of Cartagena on the 11th of November and La Inmaculada Concepcion (Immaculate Conception) on the 8th of December. Finally, the year is topped off with Christmas Day, or as it’s called in Colombia, Navidad, on the 25th of December. 

For pumpin’ tunes and jumpin’ music, head over to the Maroma Nightclub in Bogota, the club is located in Zona Rosa and plays a blended mix of Colombian cool tunes and popular western music.

Armando Records nightclub in Bogota is better for the bigger parties, spanning three entire floorsl La Terraza, La Cochera and Armando Allstars, and sees varied music styles on each floor including chilled out, hard-partying with in-house DJs and a blend of Salsa and Reggaeton.

For something more sophisticated maybe you’d prefer the San Sebastian Bar, also in Bogota, they feature Argentinian Dance Classes on Wednesdays in Tango, Paso Doble, Milonga and Bolgero styles and on the weekends the club’s very own in-house band plays electric tunes to get the party started!


For a more sociable evening, the Quiebra Canto Bar Club is the place to be, on Wednesdays a ton of foreigners are attracted to the scene and on most other days the scene becomes a salsa club for those with fire in their feet.

Two for one cocktails during the week? Yes please! The Jhonny Cay Reggae Bar has this amazing deal on during the week and plays cool reggae and calypso music all week long. The club is located in the La Zona T district of Bogota and is named after the Caribbean Island, Jhonny Cay. 

Money

The country uses the Colombian Peso as currency and uses the international currency code COP. Although it has been sub dividable in the past down into 8 and 10 Reales as well as 100 Centavos, today it is not sub dividable into any other coinage. COL 1890 is equal to about $1 or £0.60.

Today, Coins are available in 20, 50, 100, 200 and 500 Peso variants.

Bank Notes are available in 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000, 20,000 and 50,000 variants.

Economy

Colombia’s economy today is worth around $365 Billion (£217 Billion) and sees around 4.3% GDP Growth Annually. The country’s main sectors are in Services (52.7%) Industry (38%) and Agriculture (9.3%), and employ around 92.2% of the population. Within these sectors, the biggest industries are in textiles, food processing, oil, clothing, footwear, beverages, chemicals, cement, gold, coal and emeralds. Colombia mainly trades with the US (39.4%), Spain (5.1%), China (4.9%) and the Netherlands (4.3%).

Banking

Banking in Colombia is very similar to countries in the west and in urban areas ATMs are widespread, but they may be less so in more rural areas. Bank Accounts come in two varieties; Current Accounts and Savings Accounts. Current Accounts allow one easy access to his or her bank account with minimal effort, but offer low interest rates, however, Savings Accounts are to the contrary and will offer higher interest rates but won’t necessarily allow the same ease of access that a Current Account would.

Taxes

National Taxes are applied to all Colombian Nationals and to all Foreign Nationals whom have lived in the country for over five years. Tax types include: Income Tax, Stamp Tax, Value Added Tax and Local Taxes.

Income Tax scales based on your income:

  • Below $28,000 (£17,000) – 0%
  • $28,000 to $44,000 (£26,000) – 19%
  • $44,000 to $106,000 (£63,000) – 28%
  • Over $106,000 – 33%
Stamp Tax is paid in varying amounts on all official documents such as contracts sent from one party to another. Value Added Tax (VAT) is paid at a rate of 16% on all goods and services with exceptions to public transportation, water supply and sanitation and the transportation of hydrocarbons and natural gas.

Local Taxes vary greatly based on the constituency and may include:
  • Tax on Lottery Winnings (including out-of-state)
  • Tax on Beer, Liquor or Cigarettes
  • Tax on Gasoline or Automobiles
  • Tax on Gasoline
  • Tax on Slaughterhouses
  • Tax to Register Academic Degrees, Patents and/or Names
  • Tax on Advertising
  • Tax on Real Estate and both Industrial and Commercial Establishments

Influenced through Indigenous, Spanish and African input and recently seeing both Arab and Asian influences also having effect, Colombian Cuisine sees a great variety in its foodstuffs and has ingredients included from the Caribbean shoreline, the mountainous regions, the Pacific coast, ranch lands and jungle environments. Although dishes vary from region to region greatly, especially prominent is Colombia’s coffee, which has found critical acclaim worldwide. Common ingredients include rice, cassava, maize, potatoes, legumes, chicken, beef, goat, pork, fish, seafood of varying types, cape gooseberry, araza, feijoa, dragon fruit, granadilla, mangostino, guava, papaya, lulo, blackberries, passionfruit and soursop.


Dishes across Colombia may include Ajiaco (chicken, potato and corn stew with the guasca herb), Tamales (steamed corn wrapped in a corn husk and filled with varying fillings including chicken, peas, potatoes, carrots and rice), Changua (milk soup with eggs), Aborrajado (deep fried plantains with cheese), Empanadas (pastry filledwith meat or vegetables) and Lechona (a roast pig stuffed with yellow peas, rice, onions and spices). 

VISA Requirements
Citizens with passports from one of the following countries do not require a Visa to enter Colombia:

  • European Union
  • Andorra
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Azerbaijan
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belize
  • Bhutan
  • Brunei
  • Canada
  • Costa Rica
  • Dominican Republic
  • Dominica
  • El Salvador
  • Fiji
  • Georgia
  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Guyana
  • Honduras
  • Hong Kong
  • Indonesia
  • Israel
  • Jamaica
  • Japan
  • Kazakhstan
  • Malaysia
  • Marshall Islands
  • Mexico
  • Monaco
  • Micronesia
  • New Zealand
  • Palau
  • Panama
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Philippines
  • Russia
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Samoa
  • San Marino
  • Singapore
  • Sovereign Military Order of Malta
  • Solomon Islands
  • South Africa
  • South Korea
  • Suriname
  • Taiwan
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Turkey
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United States
  • Vatican City
Citizens with ID Cards from the following countries may enter Colombia:
  • Argentina
  • Bolivia
  • Brazil
  • Chile
  • Ecuador
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Uruguay
  • Venezuela
Citizens from the following countries wishing to transit through Colombia must also have a Transit Visa:
  • Bangladesh
  • Cuba
  • Ghana
  • Somalia
Health Care

Government spending on Healthcare in the 21st Century has accounted for around 20% of all government expenditures and due to the geography of the location, the level of healthcare varies dramatically between rural and urban locations. Overall the country has over 60 thousand physicians, 24 thousand nurses and 34 thousand dentists working within the country.

The biggest issues the country faces are Tropical diseases such as Malaria, Yellow Fever, Dengue Fever, Chagas Disease, Leishmania, Rabies, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus and West Nile Virus, Snake Bites due to the shortage of antivenom supplies, Malnutrition ranging up to 23% in Iron Deficiency Anemia and up to 21% in others, Strokes, Respiratory Diseases, Road Accidents, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Homicide (averaging at around 17,000 homicides a year), Measles and HIV/AIDS.

Transportation

Colombia’s railways span over three thousand kilometres, around 150 kilometres of which are 1,435mm gauge and the remainder being 914mm gauge. Seven of the country’s ten cities are linked by rail but it is considered majorly underused due to a lack of interest, seeing only around 160 thousand.

Roads are more frequently used and span over 163 thousand kilometres, of which around 70% are paved. Highways are managed by the Colombian Ministry of Transport through the National Roads institute, with their security overseen by the Highway Police unit of the Colombian National Police.

The country has some of the most airports in the world, with around a thousand being fully-functional, around 10% of which having paved runways but only two of which being more than 3047 metres in length and around 40 of which being regional airports, the busiest of which being Bogota’s El Dorado International Airport which handles 22 million passengers and over 550 million tons of cargo a year. There are also two heliports in the country.

However, Colombia’s largest transportation network for international cargo lies in its sea ports, which handle around 80% of all cargo and see the most transported in the ports of Barranquilla, Cartagena and Santa Marta on the Caribbean Coast, and Buenaventura and Tumaco on the Pacific Coast. However, other notable ports include Bahia de Portete, Puerto Bolivar, Turbo, Leticia and San Andres. Inland waterways are also highly popular methods of navigation, especially among the locals, and span over 18 thousand kilometres with 11 thousand of which being navigable via riverboat, many linking to Brazil, and carrying around 6 million passengers each year. Ships weighting over a thousand gross registered tons number 17 in total, this includes 13 cargo, 4 bulk, 3 petroleum tanker, 1 container and one liquefied gas, as well as seven ships registered in foreign countries.

Embassies

Embassies in Colombia include:
 
Algerian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Algeria in Bogota, Colombia
Carera 11 Nº 93-53, Bureau 302 Bogota DC, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 1 635 0520 
FAX
+57 1 635 0531
EMAIL
ambalgbg@cable.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
08.30AM-12.30PM and 13.00PM-16.00PM
DETAILS
Ambassador: Mr. Omar Benchehida
 
Argentina
Argentinian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Argentina in Bogota, Colombia
Av. 40 A Nro. 13-09, Piso 16, Ap. Aereo 53013, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57) 1 288-0900           
FAX
(+57) 1 288-8868
EMAIL
ecolo@mrecic.gov.ar,embargentina@etb.net.co
 
Australia
Australian Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Australian Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 69#7,-51, Apt 302, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 (1) 694 6320
 
Austria
Austrian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Austria in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 9, No. 73 - 44, Piso 4, Edificio Fiducafe, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57) (1) 326 36 90
(+57) (1) 326 36 80
(+57) (1) 326 19 36        
FAX
(+57) (1) 317 76 39
EMAIL
bogota-ob@bmeia.gv.at
OFFICE HOURS
09.00-12.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Consulate of Austria in Barranquilla, Colombia
Via 40, No. 64, 198, Zona Industrial, Loma No. 3, Barranquilla, Colombia
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
(+57) (5) 360 18 83
(+57) (5) 368 20 50        
FAX
(+57) (5) 344 03 00
(+57) (5) 344 27 87
EMAIL
oloewy@sempertex.com
OFFICE HOURS
09.00-12.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Consulate of Austria in Cali, Colombia
Carrera 13, No. 14-27, Cali, Colombia
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(+57) (2) 883 49 50        
FAX
(+57) (2) 889 65 19
EMAIL
karnar_cia@hotmail.com,hzangen@yahoo.com
OFFICE HOURS
Tue, Thu: 08.00-10.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Consulate of Austria in Cartagena, Colombia
Edificio Chambacu Business Center - Piso 6, Apartado Aereo 1626, Cartagena, Colombia
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
(+57) (5) 66 47 450
(+57) (5) 66 01 244        
FAX
(+57) (5) 66 01 244
EMAIL
hschwyn@schwyn.com
OFFICE HOURS
Mon, Tue, Wed: 09.00-12.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Consulate of Austria in Medellin, Colombia
Carrera 43A, No. 7-50, Oficina 701, Torre Empresarial, Apartado Aereo 1453, Medellin, Colombia
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
(+57) (4) 31 84 220
(+57) (4) 31 21 289        
FAX
(+57) (4) 26 84 049
EMAIL
consuladoaustria@epm.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
Mon, Wed, Fri: 09.00-12.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in San Andres, Colombia
 
Consulate of Austria in San Andres, Colombia
'La Bombonier', Avenida Juan XXIII, Apartado Aereo 35, San Andres Colombia
 
CITY
San Andres      
PHONE
(+57) (8) 512 34 30
(+57) (8) 512 60 81
(+57) (8) 512 43 30        
FAX
(+57) (8) 512 31 07
 
Barbados
Barbadian Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consul of Barbados in Bogota, Colombia
Avenida 19, 106A 83, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 637-9089  
FAX
(571) 612-3479
EMAIL
gilbertosanchezr@msn.com
 
Belgium
Belgian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Belgium in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 26 - n 4 A-45 - piso 7-Edificio KLM, Bogota D.C., Colombia
, Apartado aereo 3564 - Bogota D.C.
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+ 57 1 380.03.70
+ 57 1 380.03.80           
FAX
+ 57 1 380.03.40
WEBSITE
http://www.diplomatie.be/bogotafr        
EMAIL
Bogota@diplobel.fed.be
OFFICE HOURS
De lunes a jueves de 9:00 a 12:30 y de 13:30 a 16:00
Viernes de 9:00 a 12:00
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Barranquilla, Colombia
Calle 77B, n 57-141, Officina 812, Centro Empresarial las Americas, Barranquilla, Colombia
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
+ (57) (5) 360.26.66       
FAX
+ (57) (5) 360.51.11
EMAIL
juanrulseco@epm.net.co
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Bucaramanga, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Bucaramanga, Colombia
P/a Comite de Cafeteros - Parque Industrial, Parque Industrial de Bucaramanga, Via Palenque, Cafe Madrid., Bucaramanga
, Apartado aereo 16 - Bucaramanga
 
CITY
Bucaramanga   
PHONE
+ (57) (7) 676.06.01       
FAX
+ (57) (7) 676.11.06
EMAIL
sergio.mantilla@cafedecolombia.com
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Cali, Colombia
Parque tecnologico de la Umbria , Universidad San Buenaventura, Via Pance, Cali - Colombia
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
+ (57) (2) 524 0425        
FAX
+ (57) (2) 524 0425
EMAIL
consulado_belgica_cali@iptotal.com
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Cartagena, Colombia
Edificio Vina del Mar - Cra 6 N 6-57, Apto 1201 Bocagrande, Cartagena
, Apartado aereo 116, Cartagena
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
+ (57) (95) 655.01.87     
FAX
+ (57) (95) 669.07.06
EMAIL
tempocaribe@epm.net.co
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Medellin, Colombia
Diagonal 75B n 2A-120 - Oficina 309, Edificio Promotora Medica de las Americas, Medellin
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
+ (57) (4) 341.60.60       
FAX
+ (57) (4) 341.05.04
EMAIL
gjuribe@lasamericas.com.co
 
Belgium
Belgian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Bosnia- Herzegovina in Colombia
Calle 26 - n°4 A-45 - piso 7 Bogota D.C.
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+ (57) (1) 380.03.70 /     
FAX
+ (57) (1) 380.03.80
WEBSITE
http://www.diplomatie.be/bogotafr        
EMAIL
Bogota@diplobel.fed.be
 
Bolivia
Bolivian Embassy in Santafe De Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Bolivia in Santafe de Bogota, Colombia
Transversal 20 No 124-25 , Santafe de Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Santafe de Bogota       
PHONE
(57)(1) 2136308 or 2137852       
FAX
57)(1) 6123151
EMAIL
embassy@colomsat.net.co
 
Brazil
Brazilian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Brazil in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 93 No. 14-20 piso 8
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 218 0800  
FAX
(571) 218 8393
WEBSITE
http://bogota.itamaraty.gov.br/pt-br/     
EMAIL
secom2@brasil.org.co
 
Bulgaria
Bulgarian Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consul of the Republic of Bulgaria to the Republic of Colombia
Sr. Carlos Umana Trujillo, Calle 70 # 4-60, Bogota D. C., Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 540 54 33
223-346201
EMAIL
cumana@brigardurrutia.com.co
 
Canada
Canadian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Canadian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 7 No. 115-33 Piso 14, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(011 57 1) 657 9800      
FAX
(011 57 1) 657 9912
WEBSITE
http://www.bogota.gc.ca           
EMAIL
bgota@international.gc.ca
OFFICE HOURS
Monday - Thursday: 8:00 a.m.- 12:30p.m., 1:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.
 
Canada
Canadian Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Consulate of Canada in Cartagena, Colombia
Edificio Centro Ejecutivo Bocagrande, , Carrera 3, #8-129, Oficina 1103, Cartagena, Colombia
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
(011 57 5) 665-5838      
FAX
(011 57 5) 665-5837
EMAIL
honcartagena@enred.com
 
Chile
Chilean Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Chile in Colombia
Calle 100 Nro 11 B-44; , Apartado Aereo 90061.Bogota
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
57(1) 620 6613
620 2417
215 6886          
FAX
57(1)6193863
EMAIL
embajadachile@cable.net.co
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Consulate General of Chile in Barranquilla
CRA. 51 B N 82-254 Of.61
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
57-035-3509292
FAX
57-095-3509254
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Bucaramanga, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Chile in Bucaramanga
Calle 28 N 20-06
 
CITY
Bucaramanga   
PHONE
57-037-6522689
FAX
57-097-6421549
EMAIL
conchilebu@hotmail.com
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Chile in Cali
CRA. 98 N 18-49 P.1
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
57(032)3157986 - 3319090 ext.3299       
FAX
57(092)3157986
EMAIL
fdelilidg@telesat.com.co
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Cartagena De Indias, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Chile in Cartagena de Indias
Carrera 4#5-74 Bocagrande Cartagena de Indias
 
CITY
Cartagena de Indias      
PHONE
57-5-6653958    
FAX
57-5-6653958
EMAIL
araceliml02@yahoo.com
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Chile in Medellin
Carrera 48 N 12 Sur-70, , Oficina 808 El Crucero
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
57-034-3135265/2209 - 3135264 
FAX
57-094-3131608
EMAIL
wfmedellin@epm.net.co
 
China
Chinese Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Chinese Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 16 No. 98-30, Santa Fe de Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
0057-1-6223213
0057-1-6223126
0057-1-6223215
FAX
0057-1-6223114
WEBSITE
http://co.china-embassy.org     
EMAIL
chinaemb_co@mfa.gov.cn
 
China
Chinese Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Chinese Consulate General in Barranquilla, Colombia
Calle 80 no.51-69 Apto 25, Barranquilla, Colombia
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
00575-3562175 
FAX
00575-3783535
EMAIL
consuladochino@dinanet.net.co
 
Costa Rica
Costa Rican Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Costa Rica in Bogota, Colombia
Street No. 103. 16-60 Chico , Northern Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(00571) -218-1999 / 636-2681     
FAX
00571-257-4754
WEBSITE
http://www.embajadadecostarica.org     
EMAIL
info@embajadadecostarica.org
OFFICE HOURS
8 am to 1:30 pm
 
Cuba
Cuban Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Cuba in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 9na. No. 92-54, Chico, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(5712) 621 7054
(5712) 621 6116
FAX
(5712) 611 4382
WEBSITE
http://www.cubadiplomatica.cu/colombia           
EMAIL
embacuba@telmex.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday: 9.00am - 12:00 pm. Rest of Cuban holidays
DETAILS
Ambassador: His Excellency Jorge Ivan Mora Godoy
 
Cyprus
Cypriot Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Cyprus in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 6, No. 86-57, Apto 702 , Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 1 621 0227, Mob: +57 316 267 5521
FAX
+57 1 802 4699
EMAIL
e.eliades@yahoo.com
OFFICE HOURS
by appointment
 
Czech Republic
Czech Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of the Czech Republic in Bogota, Colombia
Avenida 7, No. 114-33, Oficinas 603-604, Edificio The Royal Bank of Scotland, RBS, Bogota D.C.
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
0057-1-6400600
0057-1-6400601
0057-1-6400602
FAX
0057-1-6400599
WEBSITE
http://www.mzv.cz/bogota         
EMAIL
bogota@embassy.mzv.cz
OFFICE HOURS
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 07.45 - 16.15 Opening Hours For Public: Monday, Wendesday, Friday 09.00 - 12.00
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic in Barranquilla, Colombia
Calle 76 # 57-44, Local 9, Barranquilla
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
0057-5-3533452, 3533453          
FAX
0057-5-3533452
EMAIL
barranquilla@honorary.mzv.cz
OFFICE HOURS
Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 09.00 to 12.00
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Cartagena De Indias, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia
Calle Cochera del Hobo No. 38-87, Barrio San Diego, Cartagena de Indias, Colombia
 
CITY
Cartagena de Indias      
PHONE
0057-5-6648612, 6648332          
FAX
0057-5-6648332
EMAIL
cartagena@honorary.mzv.cz
OFFICE HOURS
Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 09.00 to 12.00
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic in Medellin, Colombia
Calle 50 No. 42-54, Medellin, Colombia
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
0054/2393333   
FAX
0054/2397062
EMAIL
medellin@honorary.mzv.cz
OFFICE HOURS
Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 09.00 to 12.00
 
Denmark
Danish Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Royal Danish Consulate General in Colombia
Carrera 11, No. 73-20, Oficina 201, Codigo Postal: 1101
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 (1) 211-1688           
FAX
+57 (1) 211-1688
WEBSITE
http://www.ambbrasilia.um.dk/en/servicemenu/Contact/ConsulatesInColombia/    
EMAIL
tkl@etb.net.co
 
Denmark
Danish Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Danish Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
Consulado Real de Dinamarca, Calle 77 No. 74-111, Postadr.: Apartado no. 939
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
+57 (5) 353 0222           
FAX
+57 (5) 353 0095
WEBSITE
http://www.ambbrasilia.um.dk/en/servicemenu/Contact/ConsulatesInColombia/    
EMAIL
ramit@telecom.com.co
DETAILS
Consul: Carlos J. Recio
 
Denmark
Danish Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Danish Consulate in Cali, Colombia
Consulado Real de Dinamarca , Avenida 4 Norte No. 4n-46 , Barrio Centenario, Postadr.: Consulado Real de Dinamarca , Apartado Aereo 99
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
+57 (2) 661 4368           
FAX
+57 (2) 667 5233
WEBSITE
http://www.ambbrasilia.um.dk/en/servicemenu/Contact/ConsulatesInColombia/    
EMAIL
henryjensen@hotmail.com
DETAILS
Consul General: Knud Henry Jensen
 
Dominican Republic
Dominican Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Dominican Republic Consulate in Colombia
Carrera 38 No. 6-23, 3 floor
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(+57-2) 5571939, 5141760         
FAX
(+57-2) 6836885
EMAIL
consudomcali@uniweb.net.co
 
Dominican Republic
Dominican Consulate in Santa Marta, Colombia
 
Dominican Republic Consulate in Colombia
Carrera 21 No. 15-99, los Bancos Building, Office 804
 
CITY
Santa Marta     
PHONE
(+57-54) 33526
 
Dominican Republic
Dominican Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Dominican Republic Consulate in Colombia
Transversal 29 No. 120-59, Sta. Bárbara
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57-1) 2138645, 6291459, 3592560       
FAX
(+57-1) 5201588
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Ecuador in Colombia
Av. Cll 72 No 6 - 30 Piso 7, Edificio Fernando Mazuera
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57-1) 212 65 12 /23 / 25 /49    
FAX
(+57-1) 212 65 36 / 41
EMAIL
mecucol@cable.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
Lunes a Viernes 8:30 AM - 6:00 PM
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Consulate General of Ecuador in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 67 N. 7-35, Oficina 1102, Piso 11, Edificio Plaza 67.
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(0057-1) 3175328 / 3175329       
FAX
(0057-1) 3175324
EMAIL
cecubogota@mmrree.gov.ec
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Ecuadorian Consulate in Cali, Colombia
Edificio Torre de Cali, Calle 19 Norte Nº2N-29, Oficina 23-02C
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(00572) 6612264           
FAX
(00572) 6604085
EMAIL
cecucali@uniweb.net.co
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Ecuadorian Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
Centrol - Calle Gastelbondo,, Local No. 18. Edificio Sto. Domingo, Apartado Aéreo 4255
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
(0095) 664 4168
FAX
(0095) 660 0416
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Ipiales, Colombia
 
Consulate of Ecuador in Ipiales, Colombia
Carrera 7ma. No. 14-10 y Calle 14, 2do. Piso.
 
CITY
Ipiales  
PHONE
(00572) 7732292
EMAIL
coecuipi@telecom.com.co
 
Egypt
Egyptian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Egypt in Colombia
TRANSVERSAL 19 A # 101-10 Santafe De Bogota
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 2562940 - 2561976 - 6163401        
FAX
(571) 2569255
 
El Salvador
Salvadoran Embassy in Colombia, Colombia
 
Embassy of El Salvador in Colombia
Carrera 9, 8015, Ofic 503, Edificio El Nogal, Santafe
 
CITY
Colombia         
PHONE
0571 349 6775 or 0571 349 6770
FAX
0571 349 8492
EMAIL
elsalvadorcolombia@cable.net.co
 
El Salvador
Salvadoran Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of El Salvador in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 9, 8015, Ofic 503, Edificio El Nogal, Santafé de Bogotá
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
0571 349 6775, 0571 349 6770   
FAX
0571 349 8492
EMAIL
elsalvadorcolombia@cable.net.co
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Colombia
Avenida El Dorado No. 69A-51, Interior 1, Piso 5, A.A. 75155, Santa Fe
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(00 57 1) 410 9349 or 412 4111  
FAX
(00 57 1) 410 9393
EMAIL
oficina.berlin@t-online.de
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Barranquilla, Colombia
Juan Manuel Ruiseco & Co., Calle 77B Nro. 57141, Centro Empresarial Las Americas, Piso 8, Oficina 812
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
(575) 360 26 66 
FAX
(575) 360 51 11
EMAIL
juanruiseco@etn.net.com
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Cali, Colombia
Av 4 Norte # 4N-46
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(+572) 661 4428
FAX
(+572) 667 5233
EMAIL
lhjensen@telesat.com.co
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Cartagena, Colombia
Carrera 10 No. 5A - 26, Edificio Mainero, Piso 3, Apto 301, Castillo Grande
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
(+57) 315-7317137
EMAIL
mamapebles@hotmail.com
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Medellin, Colombia
Calle 17 A Sur 47-35, Apartado Aereo 1468
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
+ 57 4 313 47 34           
FAX
+57 4 313 35 62
EMAIL
jaue1940@hotmail.com
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Santa Fe De Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Santa Fe de Bogota, Colombia
Avenida Eldorado No. 69A-51, Interior 1, piso 5, A.A., 75155
 
CITY
Santa Fe de Bogota     
PHONE
(+57-1-) 410 9349, 412 4111 ext. 5029, 426 9999 (direct) 
FAX
(+57-1-) 410 9393
EMAIL
maria.t.botero@marshmc.com
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Vice-Consulate of Finland in Santa Fe de Bogota, Colombia
Vice-Consulado Honorario de Finlandia, Eratrading Colombia Ltda, Transversal 5A # 127-46, Torre 6, Apto 501
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57 1) 647 10 28 / 06 85           
FAX
(+57 1) 647 06 85
EMAIL
faberaco@coldecon.net.co
 
France
French Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of France in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 11, n' 93, 12 apartado areo, 29611
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 638 14 00 
FAX
(571) 638 14 30
EMAIL
presse@ambafrance-co.org
 
France
French Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of France in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 11, n' 93-12 Apartado Aereo, 29611 Bogota
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
[571] 638 14 48 
FAX
[571] 638 14 55
EMAIL
consulat@ambafrance-co.org
 
Germany
German Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Germany in Bogota, Colombia
Cra. 69 No. 25B-44, piso 7, Edificio "World Business Port" (edificio El Tiempo) , Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
0057-1-4232600
FAX
0057-1-4293145
WEBSITE
http://www.bogota.diplo.de/Vertretung/bogota/de/Startseite.html
EMAIL
info@bogota.diplo.de
 
Germany
German Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Germany in Barranquilla, Colombia
Calle 77 B No. 57 - 141, Ofc. 309, P.O Box Apartado Aéreo 668, Barranquilla., Centro Empresarial de las Americas, Barranquilla, Colombia
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
(57-5)3685384   
FAX
(57-5)3685384
WEBSITE
http://www.bogota.diplo.de/Vertretung/bogota/es/seite__honorarkonsul.html      
EMAIL
consulalemanbq@hotmail.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Germany in Cali
Calle 1 B Nr. 66 B - 29, Cali, Valle del Cauca
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(0057 2) 3 23 44 35 /( 57-2)3234435/ (57-2)3238402/ (0057 310) 8 22 75 87 Mobile 
FAX
(0057 2) 3 23 37 84
WEBSITE
http://www.bogota.diplo.de/Vertretung/bogota/es/seite__honorarkonsul.html      
EMAIL
consuladoalemancali@lycos.com
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday: 8:30 to 11:00 am
 
Germany
German Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Germany in Medellin, Colombia
Cra. 48 No. 26 sur - 181, local 106, Centro Integral Las Vegas, Medellin, Colombia
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
( 57-4)3346474  
FAX
(57-4)3318716
WEBSITE
http://www.bogota.diplo.de/Vertretung/bogota/es/seite__honorarkonsul.html      
EMAIL
mconsulalemanmed@une.net.co
 
Germany
German Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Germany in Cartagena, Colombia
Diagonal 21 # 53-25 Piso 2, Bosque, Avenida Principal, Cartagena, Colombia
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
+57 5 6694041  
FAX
+57 5 6694089
WEBSITE
http://www.bogota.diplo.de/Vertretung/bogota/es/seite__honorarkonsul.html      
EMAIL
fbolle@costa.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday: 2:30 to 4:30 pm
 
Greece
Greek Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Greece in Bogota
Carrera 12 A No 78/18, Santa Fe De Bogota D.C., Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(00571) 2113576, 6107854 -       
FAX
(00571) 2111845, 6203947
 
Greece
Greek Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Greece in Cartagena
Carrera 9, Esq. Edificio Castillo del Mar , Castillo Grande, Cartagena, Colombia
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
(00575) 6551352           
FAX
(00575) 6647388
 
Greenland
Greenlandic Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Royal Danish Consulate General in Columbia
Cra. 10 No. 96-25, of. 611, Apartado No. 88 731, Bogota 8, D.C
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 (1) 610 0798           
FAX
+57 (1) 610 0829
EMAIL
danconsu@andinet.com
DETAILS
The Faroe Islands and Greenland are part of the Kingdom of Denmark. As a main principle, the Danish Constitution stipulates that the foreign and security interests for all parts of the Kingdom of Denmark are the responsibility of the Danish government.
 
Guatemala
Guatemalan Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Guatemala in Bogota, Colombia
Diagonal 145 No. 32 A-38 Edificio Marte, Apto. 604 Barrio Nueva Autopista, Cedritos, Bogotá , Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
00-57-1 614-4052
EMAIL
embcolombia@minex.gob.gt
 
Guatemala
Guatemalan Embassy in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Embassy of Guatemala in Cartagena, Colombia
Edificio Comercios La Matuna,Oficina 312, Cartagena Colombia
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
0057-095 664-0120 / 0057-095 664-0122 
FAX
0057-095 660-2760
 
Haiti
Haitian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Haiti in Colombia
Calle 106, No. 23-57, Sante Fe
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
571-214-2927    
FAX
571-620-4230
 
Honduras
Honduran Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Honduras in Colombia
Calle121 No. 11 D-23
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
00 (571) 215 74 92        
FAX
00 (571) 6370686
EMAIL
info@embajadadehonduras.org.co
OFFICE HOURS
Horario de Atención Consular: Lunes a Viernes de 9:00 am - 12:15 pm Horario de Atención Embajada: Lunes a Jueves de 9:00 am a 12:00 pm 2:00 pm a 4:00 pm Viernes de 9:00am 1:00pm
 
Honduras
Honduran Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Consulate of Honduras in Bogota, Colombia
Calle121 No. 13. 59
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+(571) 215 74 92 / +(571) 637-0680        
FAX
+(571) 637-0686
EMAIL
emhoncol@andinet.com
 
Hungary
Hungarian Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Hungary in Colombia
Calle 92 No 15-48 Oficina 404
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
609-65-75, +57-311-531-1128     
FAX
+57-1-610-0029
EMAIL
hchungria@gmail.com
DETAILS
Honorary Consul: Dr. Ildiko Szegedy-Maszak
 
Hungary
Hungarian Consulate in Cartagena De Indias, Colombia
 
Hungarian Consulate in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia
Cartagena de Indias (Bocagrande) Carrera 1 Numero 6-106 Edificio MAT ADENTRO, , Office 101
 
CITY
Cartagena de Indias      
PHONE
665-8291; 0057-315-735-40-45   
FAX
665-8516
EMAIL
lequerica@ieee.org
DETAILS
Honorary Consul: Ricardo Lequerica
 
India
Indian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of India in Colombia
Carrera 7 # 71-21, Oficina 1001 Torre B, Multifinanciera, Edificio Bancafe
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
00-57-1-3174865, 3174876         
FAX
00-37-1-3174976
WEBSITE
http://www.embajadaindia.org   
EMAIL
indembog@cable.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Friday 8:30am a 5:00pm
 
Indonesia
Indonesian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Indonesia in Bogota, Columbia
Carrera 11 No. 75-27 , Bogota, Columbia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 2119735 - 2172404           
FAX
3262165/66
WEBSITE
http://www.indonesiabogota.org.co       
EMAIL
eindones@colomsat.net.co,stafpol@colomsat.net.co
 
Ireland
Irish Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Ireland in Bogota, Colombia
De Las Americas 56-41
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+ 571 4466114  
FAX
+571 4466120
EMAIL
gomezconsulirlanda@smurfitkappa.com.co, machadoconsulirlanda@cttas-smurfitkappa.com.co
DETAILS
Honorary Consul: Carlos Gomez Lecompte Diplomatic Representation for Colombia is handled by the embassy in Mexico (Mexico City)
 
Israel
Israeli Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Israel in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 35 No. 7 - 25, Piso 14
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
57-1-3277500    
FAX
57-1-3277555
WEBSITE
http://bogota.mfa.gov.il
EMAIL
info@bogota.mfa.gov.il
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Thursday: 9:00 am - 12:00pm
 
Italy
Italian Embassy in Bagota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Italy in Bagota, Colombia
Calle 93, B, n. 9-92
 
CITY
Bagota
PHONE
+57(1) 2187206 
FAX
+57(1) 6105886
WEBSITE
http://www.ambbogota.esteri.it  
EMAIL
ambbogo.mail@esteri.it
 
Jamaica
Jamaican Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Jamaica in Colombia
Avenida 19 No.106A-83 Of 304, Apartado aereo: 102428, Santafé de Bogota
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
571- 612-33-89/612-33-96 & 612-35-98 (DIRECT) 
FAX
571-612-34-79
EMAIL
emjacol@cable.net.co
DETAILS
CHARGE D'AFFAIRES & CONSUL GENERAL - MRS ELAINE SANCHEZ
 
Jamaica
Jamaican Consulate in San Andres, Colombia
 
Jamaican Consulate in San Andres, Colombia
Optica San Andres, Local 2, Transversal 2, San Andres Island
 
CITY
San Andres      
PHONE
578 512 5471    
FAX
578 512 5471
EMAIL
robinsonai@hotmail.com
DETAILS
HONORARY CONSUL: MR SAMUEL ROBINSON DAVIS
 
Japan
Japanese Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Japan in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 7. No. 71-21, Torre B Piso 11, Edificio Avenida Chile, (Apartado Aereo 7407)
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57-1-317-5001 
FAX
+57-1-317-4989
WEBSITE
http://www.colombia.emb-japan.go.jp/
 
Lebanon
Lebanese Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Lebanon in Bogota, Colombia
Lebanese Embassy , Calle 74 Nº 12-44, Calle 74 Nº 12-44, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57) 1 212 8360/(+57) 1 235 7792         
FAX
(+57) 1 347 9106
EMAIL
emblibanco@hotmail.com
OFFICE HOURS
8:00 am to 3:00 pm
 
Malta
Maltese Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Malta in Bogota, Colombia
Las Villas, Apartado Aereo No. 65-30, Santa Fe de Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
0057 (01) 522 0563       
FAX
0057 (01) 624 6846
EMAIL
maltaconsul.bogota@gov.mt
 
Mexico
Mexican Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Mexican Embassy in Colombia
Teleport Business Park, Calle 113 No. 7-21, Edificio Teleport Business Park, Oficina 204
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 6 29 49 89
FAX
(571) 6 29 51 21
WEBSITE
http://www.sre.gob.mx/colombia           
EMAIL
emcolmex@etb.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
08:00 am to 16:30 pm
 
Morocco
Moroccan Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of the Kingdom of Morocco in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 13 A No. 98, Bogota
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57-1) 2188075, 2187147         
FAX
(+57-1) 2188068
EMAIL
sifamabogot@aldato.com.co
 
Netherlands
Dutch Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Holland, Netherlands in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 13 No. 93-40 Floor 5, Apartado Aereo 4385, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57) 1-638 4200           
FAX
(+57) 1-623 3020
EMAIL
bog@minbuza.nl
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Thursday 08:00-16:30 Friday 08:00-13:30
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Consulate-General Barranquilla, Colombia
Calle 77B No. 57-141 Oficina 806, Barranquilla, Colombia
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
(+57 5) 368 83 87          
FAX
(+57 5) 368 83 87
EMAIL
jslagter@epm.net.co
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Consulate Cali, Colombia
Carrera 39 No. 11-165 Acopi-Yumbo, Cali, Colombia
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(+57 2) 666 16 63          
FAX
(+57 2) 690 69 01
EMAIL
consuladopaisesbajoscali@vdl.com.co
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Consulate-General Medellin, Colombia
Calle 52 No. 47-42 Oficina 1001 Edificio, Coltejer, Medellin, Colombia
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
(+57 4) 514 07 56          
FAX
(+57 4) 514 07 56
EMAIL
consulholanda@diagonal-colombia.com
 
New Zealand
Kiwi Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
New Zealand Consulate in Bogota
-
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57-1-633-1322 
FAX
+57-1-274-7135
EMAIL
pearsona@cable.net.co
DETAILS
Honorary Consul: Annette Pearson
 
Nicaragua
Nicaraguan Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Nicaragua in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 108A No. 25-44, Entre La Avenida 19 y Autopista Norte
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57-1-6198911
EMAIL
co.embajada02@cancilleria.gob.ni
 
Nicaragua
Nicaraguan Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Consulate of Nicaragua
Carrera 19 No- 106-91, Urbanizacion Santa Barbara
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57-1) 6198963, 6198934         
FAX
(+57-1) 2157911
 
Norway
Norwegian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Royal Norwegian Embassy in Bogota
Edificio Fiducafe, Piso 8, #801, Carrera 9 no. 73-44
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+ 57-1-317-7851
FAX
+ 57-1-317-7858
WEBSITE
http://www.noruega.org.co/       
EMAIL
emb.bogota@mfa.no
DETAILS
Ambassador Vibeke Knudsen
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Royal Norwegian Honorary Consulate in Cali
Calle 4 No 27-52,, Barrio San Fernando
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
+57-2-557-5780 or 557-5043      
FAX
+57-2-557-5351 or 557-2231
WEBSITE
http://www.noruega.org.co/Embassy/Informasjon-Ambassade/consulados/cali/  
EMAIL
Rodrigo.otoya@girosyfinanzas.com
OFFICE HOURS
0800 - 1200 and 1400 - 1800
DETAILS
Consul Rodrigo Otoya Dominguez
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Buenaventura, Colombia
 
Royal Norwegian Honorary Consulate in Buenaventura
Edificio Rldan, alle 8A No. 3-52, Oficina 201
 
CITY
Buenaventura   
PHONE
+57 2 242 21 54, 242 39 73       
FAX
+57 2 241 80 91
WEBSITE
http://www.noruega.org.co
OFFICE HOURS
0800 - 1200 and 1400 - 1800
DETAILS
Viceconsul Miguel Antonio Caro Niño
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Royal Norwegian Honorary Consulate in Barranquilla
Cra. 52 No. 85-24
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
+57-5373-8764  
FAX
+57-5357-2491
WEBSITE
http://www.noruega.org.co/Embassy/Informasjon-Ambassade/consulados/barranquilla/  
EMAIL
kgl.norskconbaq@roscoltda.com
DETAILS
Consul Christian Ostbye
 
Pakistan
Pakistani Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Honorary Investment Counsellor of Pakistan in Colombia
Diogonal 109 No. 18-72,, Santa Fe de Bogota- Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+571) 213-7828
FAX
(+574) 311-5014
WEBSITE
http://http://www.cpbizcouncil.com/       
EMAIL
pakbiz@une.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m
 
Palestine
Palestinian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Palestine Special Mission in Colombia
Calle 45 No. 14-76 , Santa Fe De Bogota
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
57-1-2877691 / 2877904
FAX
57-1-2887439
EMAIL
jerusalem@telesat.com.co
 
Panama
Panamanian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Panama in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 92 # 7A-40
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 (1) 257-5067/8        
FAX
+57 (1) 257-5068
WEBSITE
http://www.empacol.org
EMAIL
administrador@empacol.org
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 9 am - 1 Pm
 
Paraguay
Paraguayan Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Paraguay in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 7 No 72-28 - of. 302
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57) (1) 347-0322         
FAX
(+57) (1) 347-0322
EMAIL
embapar@etb.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
08:00 - 14:00 and 16:00 - 18:00
 
Peru
Peruvian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Peru in Colombia
Calle 80A Nro 6 -50
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57-1) 2570505, 2498362         
FAX
(+57-1) 2498581
WEBSITE
http://www.embajadadelperu.org.co      
EMAIL
lbogota@cable.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
09:00 - 17:30
 
Peru
Peruvian Consulate in Barrannquilla, Colombia
 
Consulate of Peru in Barrannquilla, Colombia
Calle 98 Carrera 65 Esquina, Barranquilla, Colombia, -, -
 
CITY
Barrannquilla    
PHONE
(+57) 5 3616750
FAX
(+57) 5 3616795
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
suribe@argos.com.co
OFFICE HOURS
09:00 to 11:30
 
Philippines
Filipino Consulate in Bogota, Colombia
 
Consulate of Philippines in Bogota, Colombia
Avenida 15-119-24, Piso 2
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57) (1) 2155696 / 33 or (+57) (1) 2159695         
FAX
(+57) (1) 2155959
 
Poland
Polish Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Poland in Bogota
Calle 104a, No 23-48, PO Box 101363
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57-1) 2140400, 2142931         
FAX
(+57-1) 2140854
WEBSITE
http://www.bogota.polemb.net  
EMAIL
jacek.perlin@msz.gov.pl
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Consulate of Poland in Colombia
Carrera 57 nr 72-44
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
(+57-5) 3452630, 3459361, 3688058       
FAX
(+57-5) 3562734
EMAIL
gerencia@arriendosdelnorte.net
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Ibagué, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Ibagué
Carrera 3 No 3-47 Hotel International Casa Morales B/la Pola, Ibagué Tolima, , -, -, -
 
CITY
Ibagué 
PHONE
(00-57) 315-390-3361     
FAX
(00-57-1) 263-76-20
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
consuladopoloniaibaque@hotmail.com
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Cartagena De Indias, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Cartagena de Indias
Carrera 3 No. 8-129, Oficina 1501, edif. Centro , Ejecutivo Bocagrande, , -, -, -
 
CITY
Cartagena de Indias      
PHONE
(00-57) 311-657-6545     
FAX
(00-57-5) 665-29-68
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
benny.schuster@ibsseguros.com
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland in Medellin
Calle Circular 4 No. 66B-09, , -, -, -, -
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
(00-57) 311-516-9240     
FAX
(00-57-4) 230-85-64
WEBSITE
http://- 
EMAIL
grestrepos@grupoargos.com
 
Portugal
Portuguese Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Portugal in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 12, 93-37 oficina 302 / 303, Bogota, Distrito Capital, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(00 57 1) 622 13 34 - 622 23 45 - 622 13 56         
FAX
(00 57 1) 622 11 34
 
Romania
Romanian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Romania in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 7, no. 92-58
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(00) (57) (1) 2566438 or 2566458
FAX
(00) (57) (1) 2566158
EMAIL
ambrombogota@etb.net.co
 
Russia
Russian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Russian Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 4, 75-00 Apartado Aerero, 90600, Bogota , D.E. Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 1 212-1881, 212-5560         
FAX
+57 1 210-4694
WEBSITE
http://www.colombia.mid.ru       
EMAIL
embajadarusia@cable.net.co
OFFICE HOURS
08.30-13.30 and 15.00-18.30
 
Slovenia
Slovenian Embassy in Zagreb, Colombia
 
Embassy of Slovenia in Croatia
Savska cesta 41/anex/II
 
CITY
Zagreb 
PHONE
+385-1-6311000
FAX
+385-1-6177236
EMAIL
vzg@mzz-dkp.gov.si
 
Spain
Spanish Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Spain in Bogot, Colombia
92 Steet No. 12-68
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
6181288           
FAX
621 08 09
 
Sweden
Swedish Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Sweden, Bogota Distrito Capital
Calle 72 No. 5-83, Edificio Avenida de Chile, piso 8, Bogota D.C., Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
+57 (1) 325 61 80          
FAX
+57 (1) 325 61 81
EMAIL
ambassaden.bogota@foreign.ministry.se
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Thursday 9 a.m. to 12 noon Visa (applications and processing): Visa section Monday-Thursday 9 to 11 a.m., Consular section, Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Medellin
Calle 16 A sur No. 30-53, El Poblado, Medellin, Colombia
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
+57 (4) 311 99 83          
FAX
+57 (4) 313 27 29
EMAIL
consulsueciamedellin@yahoo.com.mx
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 8 a.m. to 12 noon
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Cartagena, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Cartagena (Colombia)
Av El Pastelillo No 24-134 Manga, Cartagena, Colombia
 
CITY
Cartagena        
PHONE
+57 (5) 660 45 94          
FAX
+57 (5) 660 60 96
EMAIL
hb@enlacecartagena.com,hb@enred.com
OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Friday 8 to 11 a.m., 2 to 5 p.m.
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Cali
Av. 4 Norte No. 4N, 46 Cali - Valle, Colombia
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
+57 (2) 661 4428, 667 3015       
FAX
+ 572 6675233
EMAIL
lhjensen@telesat.com.co
 
Switzerland
Swiss Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Switzerland in Colombia
Cra. 9a no 74-08, Piso 11, Edificio Profinanzas
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(+57-1) 3497230
FAX
(+57-1) 3497195
EMAIL
vertretung@bog.rep.admin.ch
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Colombia
c/o Pension Stein, Ave. 4 Norte, No. 3-33
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(+57-2) 6534793
FAX
(+57-2) 6534793
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Colombia
Carrera 68, No. 48 D - 48
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
(+57-4) 2304563
FAX
(+57-4) 2601881
 
Taiwan
Taiwanese Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Representative Office of Taiwan in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 11 No. 93-53, Oficina 501 Santafe de Bogota, D.C., Colombia, S.A.
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(002-57-1) 635-0969      
FAX
(002)-57-315-6492913
EMAIL
oftaipeisec@etb.net.co
 
United Kingdom
British Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Great Britain in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 9 No. 76-49, Piso 9, 8th and 9th Floors, Bogota, Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
326 8300          
FAX
326 8309/02
EMAIL
ppa.bogota@fco.gov.uk
OFFICE HOURS
Monday to Thursday: 8:30 to 11:30 Friday: 8:30 to 10:30
 
United States
American Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
U.S. Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
Calle 22D-Bis # 47-51, Carrera 45 # 22D-45, Bogota, D.C., Colombia
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(571) 315-0811
WEBSITE
http://bogota.usembassy.gov/
OFFICE HOURS
8:30 AM to 12:00 noon, Monday through Thursday
DETAILS
The American Citizen Services unit assists U.S. citizens with application for new or renewed passports, registration of citizens living in or traveling to Colombia, security information for citizens planning to travel to Colombia, registration of U.S. citizens born in Colombia, voter registration, social security and veteran's benefits, provision of federal income tax forms, notarial service for documents being used in the United States, and certain emergency services, including prisoner protection and documentation of the deceased.
 
United States
American Consulate in Barranquilla, Colombia
 
Consular Agency of United States in Barranquilla, Colombia
Calle 77B # 57-141, Oficina 511
 
CITY
Barranquilla      
PHONE
(+57) 5 353-2001           
FAX
(+57) 5 353-5216
EMAIL
conagent@metrotel.net.co
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Uruguay in Bogota, Colombia
Edificio , Carrera 9, N 80-15, Piso 11
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
(00 571) 235 2968 or 235 1462 or 235 2748         
FAX
(00 571) 248 37 34
EMAIL
urucolom@elsitio.net.co
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Cali, Colombia
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Colombia
Calle 67 Norte N 8-N-65
 
CITY
Cali      
PHONE
(+57-2) 654115, 672080 
FAX
(+57-2) 650730
 
Venezuela
Venezuelan Embassy in Bogota, Colombia
 
Embassy of Venezuela in Bogota, Colombia
Carrera 11, N 87-51, Piso 5, Edificio Horizonte Bogota
 
CITY
Bogota
PHONE
091-6364092 / 091-6364011       
FAX
0971-6107405
WEBSITE
http://www.consulvenbucaramanga.com/consulados.htm           
EMAIL
evenezu3@gaitana.interred.net.co
 
Venezuela
Venezuelan Consulate in Medellin, Colombia
 
Consulate of Venezuela in Medellin, Colombia
Calle 32-B, N 69-59, Barrio Belen Rosales, Apartado Postal 8804, Medellin, Colombia
 
CITY
Medellin           
PHONE
094-2350359 / 094-3511614 / 094-3514909          
FAX
(57 1) 351 1909
WEBSITE
http://www.consulvenbucaramanga.com/consulados.htm           
EMAIL
consulado@emp.net.co

Phone Lines

Colombia uses the Country Code +57 and has over 31 million mobile telephone subscribers and over 8 million landline users. Coverage of the region exceeds 90% and Colombia Telecom is responsible for around a third of all lines in place with the remaining two thirds split fairly evenly between around 30 other operators.

Internet

There are over 21 million internet users with around 4 million of these being mobile internet users and this equates to around 39% of the population having an online presence with around 600 thousand internet hosts. Today the biggest Internet Service Providers are Telecom, ETB, EPM, Coldecon, Telmex Colombia S.A, TV Cable SA, CableCentro, Cable Union de Occidente, TV Cable Promision SA, Dinanet and Telecom Occidente, these provide Broadband Connections in 1MB, 5MB, 10MB, 20MB and 50MB variations, including limited Fibre Optic coverage. The country’s top code is .co.

It’s important to note that even though most people enjoy free use of the Internet, journalists are regularly threatened, assaulted and murdered. Additionally, minimal censorship of the internet exists to both restrict children’s access to pornography and to remove child pornography online.

Communications

Colombia has over 60 Television stations, seven low-power stations and around 12 million television receivers are commonly used. The country also has around 520 radio stations with around 85% being AM, around 10% being FM and the last 5% being Shortwave. 

Weather & Climate

Colombia’s climate range varies greatly and includes a wide variety of climate types all across the region including Tropical Mountain Range, Tropical Savannah, Tropical Rainforest, Steppe and Tropical Desert.

In the Northern reaches of Colombia, the Tropical Mountain Range climate is most prominent, but this can be further split down into five more climate types that vary based on the altitude of the region.

Up to 1km above sea level, the Warm Climate Thermal Floor can be seen and temperatures stay constantly above 24 degrees Centigrade ( Fahrenheit) but may rise as high as 30 degrees Centigrade ( Fahrenheit), accompanied by heavy rain.

Between 1 and 2km above sea level, the Temperature Climate Thermal Floor may be observed and sees temperatures typically between 17 and 24 degrees Centigrade ( Fahrenheit), accompanied by between 2000 and 2500mm of rain annually.

Between 2 and 3km above sea level, the Cold Climate Thermal Floor is present and temperatures between 10 and 17 degrees Centigrade ( Fahrenheit) are commonplace, annual rainfall is at around 2000mm typically.

Between 3 and 4km above sea level, the Paramo Climate Thermal Floor is visible and sees temperatures at constantly below 10 degrees Centigrade ( Fahrenheit), with rare rainfall but frequent snowfall.

The Glacial Climate Thermal Floor at 4km above sea level is considered the country’s coldest weather conditions with practically non-existent rainfall, constant snowfall and temperatures constantly below 10 degrees Centigrade ( Fahrenheit), few living species inhabit regions hosting this sub-climate.

In the Eastern areas of Colombia, the Tropical Savannah climate is seen and has temperatures between 24 and 27 degrees Centigrade ( and  Fahrenheit), the climate varies a little due to the rainy and dry seasons produced by trade winds from the north east which periodically switch every six months.

In the West, the Steppe climate is the most frequent and sees temperatures being more moderate in nature, with a dry season for 5 months followed by a rainy season.

In the Southern depths of Colombia, the Tropical Rainforest climate is most visible in the Amazon Rainforest Basin and other nearby regions and sees hot and humid conditions with heavy frequent rainfall.

The Tropical Desert climate is located primarily in the centre of Colombia and sees consistently high temperatures with extremely small amounts of rainfall, usually during a singular month of the year, without a mountain barrier nearby, trade winds from the northeast are carried through the desert, producing humid conditions and droughts alike.


Holidays

Designed to perfection and located along the brilliantly blue coastline on crystal white beaches, the Royal Decameron Baru has been developed with a modern tropical style in mind and has been specially adapted to blend the hotel in with the surrounding natural environment. The hotel houses five bars, four restaurants, three swimming pools and a seven-thousand-person-capacity convention centre and has facilities to allow its guests to experience water sports as well as to just kick back, relax and catch a little sun.

With a colonial era stylization and built in the country’s age-old city of Santa Marta, the Casa de Isabella is located strategically in the Centro Historico, the city’s oldest district, alongside many other buildings that reflect a colonialist Mudejar architectural style. The hotel gives its guests access to beautiful green courtyards, a personal rooftop pool, complimentary iPads, Apple TV and, of course, the swiftest Broadband available.

Meanwhile in San Andres, the Lodges Mar y Sol keeps a traditional architectural style combined with a great use of open spacing and Colombian Caribbean décor, complimented with large balconies and beautiful views allowing for exquisite experiences of the Colombian sunsets. The hotel comes fully equipped with facilities to provide guests with delectable meals, cool refreshing drinks and a quick getaway for quiet relaxation.

Lovingly restored and reinvigorated, the Casa San Agustin in Cartagena welcomes its visitors with warm western vibes through colonial-era architectural motifs combined with brightly coloured furnishings. The hotel is particularly notable for its well-known restaurant and bar, serving up a storm of custom-crafted cocktails.

Or perhaps you’re more interested in the country’s pre-colonial history? The Merecumbe Hotel is widely renowned for its signature natural hut rooms, furnished with comfy modern fittings and décor but incorporating a breezy palm roof to ensure cool evenings in the hot weather. The hotel is located just a short walk from Dream Beach on the Caribbean coast and provides many facilities for its guests including a restaurant, wine list and a massage room. 

For the most part there are practically no restrictions children face entering Colombia that adults would not face, but it should be noted that children can only bring goods worth up to half the value of the adult maximum (normally worth around $2500), but additionally, children are exempted from airport tax.

For pets to enter Colombia, pets must be vaccinated for Rabies, Distemper, Hepatitis, Leptospirosis and Parvovirus, unless under the age of four months in which case the former is not required. Then, within 8 days of travel a certified veterinarian must complete the Veterinary Certificate for Colombia (both an original and another in Spanish), the veterinarian must be accredited by the governmental authority of the exportation of animals for your country. This often means a Rabies Certificate must also be filled out. It’s highly recommended to both put your pet on a flea and tick prevention program and having your pet microchipped prior to entering Colombia.

The following breeds (and any cross breeds) of dog are banned in Colombia:

  • American Pitbull Terrier
  • Pitbull Terrier
  • American Staffordshire Terrier
  • Staffordshire Terrier

Education in Colombia is broken down into four main stages; Nursery School, Elementary School, High School and University.

Nursery School is provided to most children over one year of age through Community Homes sponsored by the National Institute for Family Welfare, the Community Homes see mothers from the community taking care of both their own children as well as children from the nearby neighbourhood, although it should also be mentioned that there are a fair amount of private Kindergarten schools. When a child successfully learns how to read and write, they enter Elementary School.

At age five most children enter Elementary School for five years of formal education. This stage of school has a 90% attendance rate and sees a high quality of knowledge from teachers in urban areas; this is contrary to rural areas where teachers are frequently poorly qualified or not qualified at all. However, a new method of teaching titled Escuela Nueva has been being used in rural schools and has seen great success with many rural schools outperforming urban ones.

At the age of around 11 or 12 the student enters High School which is separated into Basic Secondary (grades 6 to 9) and Mid Secondary (grades 10 & 11). Mid Secondary begins to specialize the student in a particular ‘track’ which leads to a qualification at the end, these include the Academic, Industrial, Commercial, Pedagogical, Agricultural and Social Promotion fields as well as qualifications in Arts and Business.

University education requires a qualification from the tracks in Mid Secondary to enter and provides both Undergraduate and Postgraduate degrees including Specializations, Masters and PhD programs, with most degrees lasting around 3 years.  

Most schools in Colombia will require 2 Years of Experience as well as a Bachelor’s Degree in either Education or a relevant subject with a PGCE/QTS/GTC/GTP. All teachers are expected to be native speakers of English and trained in the US, UK, Canada, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand or South Africa.

It should be mentioned that although TEFL and similar certificates are not considered full teaching qualifications, teachers with these certificates will be preferred over those without. Additionally, teachers with international experience will be preferred.

Make sure to check out our guide on Work Permit and Visa Restrictions

Food in Colombia is relatively cheap and you’ll see a meal at a restaurant go for between COP 8000 and 48,000 ($4.20 to $25 or £2.50 to £15), whilst regular food goods are even cheaper still. A litre of water costs around COP 1500 ($0.79 or £0.47), a litre of milk costs about COP 2200 ($1.20 or £0.69), 500g of bread costs around COP 2500 ($1.30 or £0.78) and 12 eggs cost around COP 3800 ($2 or £1.20).

Meanwhile, luxuries are comparable and see a litre of beer at COL 4000 ($2.10 or £1.30), a bottle of mid-range wine at COL 25,000 ($13 or £7.80) and a pack of cigarettes at COL 3600 ($1.90 or £1.10).

Finally, housing costs are extremely cheap and see the rent for a 1 bedroom apartment in the city centre at COL 600,000 ($320 or £190), a 1 bedroom apartment outside of the city centre at COL 640,000 ($340 or £200), a 3 bedroom apartment in the city centre at COL 1.25 Million ($650 or £390) and a 3 bedroom apartment outside the city centre at COL 1.26 Million ($660 or £400). 

If you want to truly explore the country, you haven’t done it until you’ve hiked into the country’s deepest depths and sought the ruins of forgotten times, and Sal Si Puedes is the best guide, the ol’ veteran of the hikes, and will make sure you reach your chosen location with swiftness.

Or perhaps you’re a footy fan? The Independiente Santa Fe is known for its dedicated attitude and top-notch level play. The club has won seven national championships including one in 2012 and has existed for over sixty years.

The Poseidon Dive Centre is highly reputed as having one of the best safety records in the country and takes on all levels of divers from the inexperienced to the masters. Best of all, it offers a relaxed atmosphere with coffee and several day courses to get you started!

Maybe you’d like to get your toes tapping, your feet fleeting and your body bouncing? The Son de Luz in the Alameda neighbourhood gives private lessons and group lessons alike and teaches a variety of styles to practitioners of all experience levels.

Or maybe you’re just looking to get into shape and make some friends along the way? The House Gym is a leader in the fitness industry and creates custom training sessions adapted for each and every one of its members. 

Colombia’s biggest issue is undoubtedly the warring between multiple factions including the left-wing guerrilla fighters such as the FARC and ELN, the right-wing paramilitaries such as the AUC, the Drug Cartels and the State. Sadly, the civilian population has been known to be frequently dragged into the crossfire between these groups, often with individuals being targeted for ‘collaborating’ and as a result being extorted, kidnapped and assassinated.

The Illegal drug trade is also one of the bigger issues the country faces and sees exportation of Cocaine, Marijuana and other mainly-psychoactive drugs exported by one of several Drug Cartels.

Tourists and foreigners being kidnapped in Colombia remains low, but is still known to occur and recently it’s become more common for thieves to expose travellers to chemicals through aerosol or paper hand-outs before assaulting and robbing them.

Emergency Numbers

  • General Emergency – 112 or 123
  • Police – 156
  • Ambulance – 132
  • Fire – 119
  • Traffic Accident – 127
  • Kidnapping – 165