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About

Known officially as the Republic of Turkey, the country forms one of two borders between Europe and Asia, the other border being controlled entirely by Russia. This means it is a particularly prominent nation as the east may meet the west and subsequently the country sees an influx of culture and is said to be one of the most culturally-diverse places in the world.

The country is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea to the south, the Black Sea to the north and the Aegean Sea to the west, but it also shares borders with Bulgaria to the northwest, Greece to the west, Iraq and Syria to the southeast, Azerbaijan, Iran and Armenia to the east and Georgia to the northeast. Today it supports over 76 million inhabitants and is run by President Abdullah Gul and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan in a Unitary Parliamentary Constitutional Republic.



Stone Age History

Life in Turkey has been dated as far back as 25,000 BC through footprints found in Kula and Karain Cave. As time progressed, many civilizations formed in the region including, but not limited to, Mersin, Hacilar, Cayonu, Gobekli Tepe, Nevali Cori and Catalhoyuk. Wall paintings dated to the 6th Milennium BC depicting animals and humans have been found that date to this era as well. During the late 4th Milennium BC, the Kura-Araxes, one of many cultures in the region, began to mass-produce bronze tools.

Bronze Age History

In the 24th Century BC, the Akkadian Empire under Sargon I took control of the region and despite having little interest in the country itself, they began exporting material for manufacturing, mainly Copper. However, they lost control when the Empire fell in 2150 BC to the Gutians. For a time the Old Assyrian Empire claimed the resources, especially the silver, but the Hittite Old Kingdom eventually emerged and conquered the region under Hattusili I in the 17th Century BC.

The Hittite Empire controlled the whole region and peaked during the 14th Century BC, it’s know by this time that the group used advanced trade routes and formed political alliances with neighbouring nations. However, Kizzuwatna, another nearby civilization, controlled the Syrian border and it wasn’t until many decades later in 1344 BC that they were taken over, allowing the Hittites to fully flourish.

However, the civilization was disintegrated upon the arrival of the Sea Peoples in 1180 BC, of whom there is little known information, giving them an enigmatic origin. The civilization split into several smaller states which lasted into the Iron Age.

Iron Age History

The remnants of the Hittites were eventually driven into submission as the Greeks entered into the country, over time multiple Greek city-states were established and fell apart, specifically around those of the Mycenaeans, the Ionians and the Phrygians. The latter established their capital, Gordium, and set up a large-scale network of roads. However, many of these installations featured existing Hittite culture and buildings and thus the Hittite architectural style persisted through Greek rule. The Phrygians were in the country until the 7th Century BC when the Heraclids came into power, eventually they too were replaced by the Lydians which ruled from 687 BC onwards.

However, a little over a hundred years later in 546 BC, the Lydian king Croesus was defeated in the Battle of Thymbra by the Persian king Cyrus II, also known as Cyrus the Great. However, despite the Persian dominance of the region and their burning of the capital city of Sardis, several remaining Ionian and Lydian cities refused to fall under Persian domination and these remaining cities sent for aid from Sparta, Greece. However, no aid was delivered and thus the cities’ inhabitants either submitted to or fled from the Persian forces.

The now-ruling Achaemenid Persian Empire under Cyrus began expanding and eventually found itself ruled by Darius the Great, under whose command the strap system of localized governments and governors was utilized. After Naxos revolted against the ruling Persians in 502 BC, the nearby Ionian Greek forces under Aristagoras, a Satrap governor turned military leader, retook the city of Ionia. However, the Persian Empire snapped back and without mercy retook the city, putting an end to the revolt in 494 BC. However, this inspired other nearby cities to rebel against the Persian powers in time also.

In 334 BC Alexander the Great of Macedon landed with his forces on the shores near Sestos on the Gallipoli and engaged the Persian army in battle. He quickly defeated them in the first of many battles and used his victory to spread across the shore and liberate Lydia and Ionia, before moving further inland to take Phrygia, Cappadocia, and Cilicia. He engaged the Persian forces in the plains of Issus and thoroughly defeated them, driving King Darius and the rest of the Persian remnants out of the country for good.

Passing away eleven years later in 323 BC, the lack of a successor lead to a power vacuum which in turn saw the country and the Macedonian Empire’s territories divided between Ptolemy, Lysimachus, Seleucus and Mithridates I. Despite having peaceful beginnings, a rift between Seleucus and Lysimachus formed and culminated in warring in 281 BC, of which the former was the victor. However, Seleucus was assassinated by Ptolemy Keraunos a short while later.

He was succeeded by Antiochus I whom managed to fend off the Gauls but failed ultimately to subdue King Eumenes I of Pergamon which in turn allowed for Pergamon to claim independence. He was succeeded by Antiochus II but this was short lived as he was poisoned by his wife, she subsequently poisoned his second wife and the daughter of Ptolemy III of Egypt. Antiochus II’s son, Seleucus II took rule following the mass poisoning but due to the death of his daughter, Ptolemy III invaded Persian’s Syrian territory, taking Antioch and Seleucia in 246 BC.

Granting this new territory to Mithridates II, King of Pontus, in 245 BC, as a wedding gift, it rapidly became apparently that the Seleucids’ grip on the Turkish region was weakening. Furthermore, the Satrap of Parthia, Andragoras, lead a revolt in the same year, leading to the loss of more Seleucid territory bordering Persia. Shortly afterwards, Parthia was invaded by the Parni peoples in 238 BC and Antiochus II’s failure to end both the rebellion and the invasion lead to the creation of the Parthian Empire and the split of Parthia from Seleucid territory completely.

Meanwhile, Pergamon had rapidly taken independence from the Seleucids and increased their empire even more quickly until Seleucus III managed to take control of the empire back again, however, he had still lost much of his territory, especially that surrounding Pergamon. Rome appeared seemingly out of nowhere and began to interfere in Turkey’s affairs, as a means to take the favour of Pergamon and use an allied military force to defeat the allied forces of the Macedonian and Carthaginian Empires under Phillip V of Macedon and General Hannibal respectively. However, when Antiochus attempted to ally himself with Greece, the Romans decided this was intolerable and invaded the Turkish region in 189 BC, using political means as a way of controlling Pergamon’s rule.

However, when the Social War began in Italy in 90 BC, Mithridates VI of Pontus rebelled against the Roman Empire whilst the Romans were busy quelling a revolt in their own region. He took over the nearby region of Bithynia but withdrew when Rome demanded he do so. He managed to defeat Bithynia when they retaliated and eventually marched into Asia to convince the Greeks to attack the Romans. Rome finally retaliated itself and crushed Mithridates’ forces, leaving him only with Pontus in the Treaty of Dardanos. He attempted to revolt once more when Nicomedes IV of Bithynia passed away and Bithynia became a Roman Province, but the Romans once again crushed Mithridates and forced him to retreat. Mithridates’ repeated failures combined with rising political pressure drove him to commit suicide in 63 BC and Pontus became part of the Roman Empire as well, as well as Cilicia. The last Turkish provinces remaining were Galatia, Pisidia and Cappadocia, all ruled by Amyntas, but in 25 BC he died whilst pursuing enemies and Rome took the last provinces over, leaving the entirety of Turkey in Roman hands.


1st Century – 15th Century History

Following the turn of BC to AD, Christianity became increasingly prevalent among individuals in the region, and in St. Paul’s letters in the New Testament written between 54 and 56 AD, churches in Colossae, Troas, Magnesia and Tralleis, among others, were verified. Indeed, many already had bishops and official representatives in the government. In 112 AD the governor in Bithynia wrote to the Roman Emperor Trajan that many temples had become deserted due to the mass conversion to so many to Christianity.

For the next few hundred years, Rome lessened their grip on Turkey purposefully and the Roman Emperor Augustus actually removed all debts owed to the Roman Empire by the country’s provinces. This sudden removal of debts allowed the provinces to flourish and enjoy widespread peace and prosperity, for the first time in several hundred years the government softened taxes on the people due to a lesser burden from the Roman Empire on themselves, and made many significant advances in technology and knowledge during this time. Some of the most remarkable scientific men of the era were produced in the country including medical practitioner Galen from Pergamon, the historians Memnon of Heraclea & Cassius Dio of Nicaea as well as the philosopher Dio of Bithynia.

However, this was not to last, as in 256 AD, the Goths, driven by the Roman’s successful defence of Italy, Germany and Macedonia, entered Turkish territory through the Black Sea, landing in Trebizond. The Goths sacked the city and moved across the country, taking and sacking Prusa, Cius, Nicomedia, Apamea, Nice and Chalcedon. Only a combination of a violent turn in the weather and Valerian’s Roman Army could drive them out, but by then much of the country’s wealth had already been looted.

In 330 AD, Constantine ascended to the throne of the now-unstable Roman Empire, and upon this date he decided to both change the Roman Empire’s capital city from Rome to Byzantium, now known as Constantinople (modern day Instanbul), but also to change the state religion to Christianity in order to unite its peoples. He even went as far as to allow the bishops and religious figures to aid the government and he took part in the First Council of Nicaea. This marked the beginning of the Byzantine Empire. After his passing in 337 AD, his sons, Constantine II, Constans and Constantius II squabbled over control of the Empire, culminating in the murder of all three, one being in Turkey, and Constantine I’s nephew through his half-brother Julius Constantius, Julian, took control of the Empire.

Julian, however, did not survive for more than a year, and was succeeded by Jovian, then succeeded by Valentinian II, Valens and eventually Gratian. Gratian co-ruled alongside general Theodosius I from 379 AD onwards and together they were able to heal the religious rifts which had formed and reinstate Constantine’s policies and standards. In 395 AD, Theodosius, now called Theodosius the Great, passed away, but through his and Gratians rule the Eastern Empire now rivalled the Western Empire in strength. Indeed, when the Western Empire fractured and fell in the 5th Century, the Eastern Empire persisted still.

For the next few hundred years, the Byzantine Empire came under repeated attacks from multiple aggressors including the Sassanid Persians whom managed to siege Constantinople, the Arabs that managed to significantly diminish Byzantine territory and the Komnenian Dynasty’s crusades that severely weakened Byzantine Imperial power and unity. However, what finally toppled the Byzantine Empire were Turk states rapidly forming through an influx of European immigration across the country, squeezing the empire down to just Constantinople, and eventually, that too was taken in 1453 AD and the Byzantine Empire was ended.

16th Century – 19th Century History

At this point the newly-formed Ottoman Empire now controlled the Turk states, meaning that in effect the whole country was also under their control. Led by Memed II whom had conquered Constantinople, he allowed the Church to keep their land and affairs private provided they accept Ottoman rule, the Church agreed without hesitation due to the prior bad relations had with Byzantine rule looming over their heads. The Empire began to rapidly expand from here on out, setting up new trade routes and controlling existing ones through Europe and Asia, and in the early 16th Century, Sultan Selim I defeated Shah Ismail of the Safavid Persians and managed to establish control of Egypt as well as on the Red Sea. The Empire quickly obtained a new rivalry following these victories: the Portuguese Empire.

Selim was succeeded by Suleiman the Magnificent in 1520 AD, and he was able to take Belgrade in Serbia, as well as parts of the Kingdom of Hungary before conquering the rest of Hungary (except the western part) in 1526 AD. Suleiman attempted to take Vienna but ultimately failed to take the city after a long campaign lasting for three years between 1529 and 1532 AD. He also managed to acquire Transylvania, Moldavia and Wallachia in Romania, and went on to take Baghdad, Iraq, from the Persians in 1535 AD, effectively controlling the entire region nearby. He formed an alliance with France with mutual opposition against the Habsburgs, and jointly conquered Nice and Corsica with King Francis I, which at the time had been controlled by the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperor Charles V and King Henry VIII of England. The French also supported the Ottomans in capturing Esztergom, Hungary in 1543 AD and in 1547 AD the Habsburgs abandoned Hungary and gave rule there to the Ottomans.

In 1559, a war between the Ottomans and the Ajuran and Adal Sultanates weakened the latter enough for the former to absorb it. This essentially allowed the Ottomans to establish rule in Somalia and the Horn of Africa and begin making moves into the Indian Ocean, to compete further with the Portuguese whom had allied with the Ajurans. Suleiman was succeeded by his son, Selim II, in 1566 AD, and ruled until 1574 AD, when he in turn was succeeded by his son, Murad III. Murad ruled until 1595 AD when his son, Mehmed III, took rule and in turn was succeeded by his son, Ahmed I, in 1603 AD.

Following Suleiman the Magnificent, the Ottoman Empire entered a period of weak Sultans that misruled the government and misdirected their aims for around 120 years, this culminated in 1683 AD when the Ottomans were defeated at the Battle of Vienna by the Holy Roman Empire, ceasing the Ottoman Empire’s expansion through Europe. At the same time the Ottomans had been engaged in naval warring with the Portuguese, with the Ottomans attempting to hold a monopoly on trade routes through the Western European states and subsequent sea routes. Alongside the Ajuran Empire, the Ottoman Empire took independence from the Portuguese monopoly on the economy in the Indian Ocean by printing their own coinage. Finally, the Russian Tsardom had begun to expand and fight over borders with the Ottomans and other European nations, and, allied with the Crimean Khanate, the Ottomans and Crimeans burned Moscow in retaliation.

The Ottomans continued to attempt to invade various regions, but they met repeated defeats at the Knights of Malta in the 1565 Siege of Malta and again against the Catholic Coalition Forces of Phillip II of Spain during the Battle of Lepanto. However, they recovered quickly and persuaded Venice to sign a peace treaty in 1573, allowing the Ottomans to solidify their territories in Africa. Meanwhile, the border with the Habsburgs had found somewhat of a stalemate and as such the Ottoman military had altered their policy, letting down the strictness of the recruitment process somewhat. However, despite finding more troops, the military rapidly became disorganized and undisciplined, leading to several rebel insurgency attempts which were never fully resolved.

In 1612, Murad IV took the throne and managed to retake central authority, recapturing Yerevan in 1635 and Baghdad in 1939 from the Safavid Persians. He was succeeded by his brother, Ibrahim, whom ruled until 1648. After this point almost every Sultan became a puppet under what is called the Sultanate of Women, in which the Sultan’s wife, consort and/or harem controlled them and in turn, controlled the Ottoman Empire. However, in 1656, the Sultan began being controlled more by the Grand Viziers and this continued for many years.

The Ottoman Empire continued to take more territory nearby, including the retaking of Transylvania, Crete and South Ukraine. In 1683 however, this sequence of territory-grabbing came to an end when Grand Vizier Kara Mustafa Pasha attempted to siege Vienna once again until 1687, the final assault culminated in the Battle of Vienna when allied Habsburg, German and Polish forces mercilessly crushed the Ottoman forces and forced the surrendering of many Ottoman territories. A final attack from Mustafa II in 1695 attempted to retake Hungary from the Habsburgs but they were defeated disastrously two years later.

In 1709, King Charles XII of Sweden became an ally of the Ottoman Empire and together they declared war on Russia in 1710, claiming victory a year later and taking the region around the Pruth River. They engaged Austrian forces in 1716 in war too but lost two years later and surrendered their territories of the Banat, Serbia and Oltenia in Romania to Austria. A three-way war between Russian, Austria and the Ottoman Empire culminated in 1739, granting Serbia and Oltenia to the Ottomans, but taking the port of Azov from them as well.

For the next thirty years, the Ottoman Empire enjoyed peace and prosperity and a multitude of technological and educational reforms were set in place including the establishment of higher education institutions such as the Istanbul Technical University. Additionally, the printing press began being used to print documents and books. In 1768, Russian forces moved into Balta, Ukraine, which at the time was under Ottoman control, and burned it to the ground after massacring its people. The Ottoman Empire lashed out and began a war with Russia which lasted until 1774 and culminated in the Treaty of Kucuk Kaynarca which granted religious freedom to Christians. However, this did not stop the fighting as the Ottomans continued to war with Russia until the end of the 18th Century.

Upon the rise of Selim III to the throne in 1789, he set about making efforts to modernize the empire’s military forces but he was held back by the Janissary Corps. Eventually the corps revolted and fought back violently against Selim III, killing him, but, his son, Mahmud II, took the throne and eliminated them in turn in 1826. At this point many European countries underwent a revolution and saw independence; these included many parts of Serbia and Romania mainly. For the next fifty years between 1839 and 1876, the Ottoman government reformed the country almost completely, forming a conscripted army, replacing religious law with secular law, guilds with factories, setting about reforming the banking system and decriminalizing homosexuality.

Another war between Russia and the Ottoman Empire kicked off in 1877 and ended a year later with a victory for Russia. The victory contributed to the independence claimed by Romania and Serbia and the establishment of Bulgaria as an Ottoman principality. At the same time, Austria and Hungary occupied the Ottoman provinces of Bosnia, Herzegovina and Novi Pazar (now a part of modern-day Serbia). In 1878, Britain restored Ottoman’s Balkan territories but in turn took over administration of Cyprus and moved into Egypt in 1882, effectively gaining control of both territories. The rapid decline of the Ottoman Empire saw a rise in a more nationalist view among the peoples which in turn pushed ethnic tensions up to an all-time high and often deteriorated into violence, the worst of which occurring in 1894-1896 when around 300,000 Armenians were massacred by nationalists.

20th Century History

On the side of the Central Powers in World War I, the Ottoman Empire was defeated with great casualty; during the war the Empire adopted a Fascist outlook and deported the country’s Armenians, many however, instead of being deported, were instead exterminated. An estimated 1.5 Million Armenians were killed during the Armenian Genocide, however, to this day the Turkish Government (and many of its peoples) denies this ever taking place. However, they were not the only group massacred, indeed many other minorities in the country such as the Greeks and the Assyrians also found the same fate.

Following the end of the war, the Ottoman Empire was partitioned through the 1920 Treaty of Sevres by the Allied Powers and occupied as well. In an attempt to revoke the Treaty, Commander Mustafa Kemal Pasha of the Ottoman Empire was able to wage the Turkish War of Independence and eventually forced out the allied forces in 1923. By this point however, the Ottoman Empire’s territory had been brought down to just Turkey and sections of Bulgaria and Greece. Later on in the same year, parliament was formed and the Sultanate was formally abolished, ending the reign of the Ottoman Empire and signalling the beginning of the Republic of Turkey. At the same time, the capital was moved to Ankara and a population exchange took place, where 1.1 million Greeks would leave Turkey for Greece and 380 thousand Muslims would leave Greece for Turkey. Mustafa Kemal Pasha was granted the surname ‘Ataturk’ which means ‘Father of the Turks’ and became the country’s first President.

He instantly set about reforms in the entire country, abolishing the office of the Caliphate in 1924 and reforming religion to be privatized and separate from government affairs following 1925. In 1926 he introduced a new penal law and a new civil code. In 1928 the new Turkish Alphabet was adopted and in 1934 both surnames were enforced and titles were abolished. In the same year, women were granted full political rights of both voting and being able to be elected. Finally, in 1937, he fully separated religion from politics with the inclusion of the French principal of Laicite in the constitution. At the same time in 1932, Turkey became a member of the League of Nations and small political parties were formed to attempt to establish a multi-party system, despite not being successful at first. In 1938, Ataturk passed away and he was succeeded by Ismet Inonu.

In World War II, Turkey remained mainly neutral but did join in at the end on the side of the Allies in 1945. In the same year, Turkey became a member of the United Nations. Following this in 1947, the United States began supporting Turkey and Greece militarily and economically following the installation of the Truman Doctrine and in 1948 the two countries were included in the Marshall Plan and the OEEC for rebuilding European Economies.

In 1950, the Democratic Party was elected into Turkish Parliament and for the first five years they were very popular for their relaxation of restrictions on Islam and their ability to preside over an already-strong economy. However, as the 50s turned to 60s, the economy began to drop, the country underwent high inflation & debt and the government was forced to introduce censorship laws to limit dissent. Turkey joined NATO in 1952.

In 1960, General Cemal Gursel led a coup d’état, removing President Celal Bayar and executing Prime Minister Menderes, returning the system to civilian control a year later. Turkey also became a founding member of the OECD in 1961. However, despite the return of government politics to public control, the political scene became majorly disarrayed and ended up with a rotational government consisting of the Justice Party under Suleyman Demirel and the Republican People’s Party under Ismet Inonu.

In 1971, the military initiated another coup d’état and felled the ruling Justice Party of the time, leading to the establishment of interim governments. Prime Minister Ecevit in coalition with the highly religious National Salvation Party pushed Turkey to invade Cyprus in 1974 and following this, a series of coalitions between Right-Wing parties lead to the invention of the National Front, pushing Ecevit out of power. This political instability formed a distinctive set of two peoples in the country, Ultranationalists and Communists, of which violence often took place in Turkey’s streets, resulting in over five thousand deaths.

In 1980, General Kenan Evren lead another military coup d’état and overthrew the government once more. Martial law was installed throughout Turkey but eventually the military returned the government to the public within a couple of years and completely phased out its government control by 1983. It eventually came under control of the Motherland Party under Turgut Ozal and through his policies of a globally oriented economic program and conservative social values the economy boomed once more, seeing small towns suddenly and rapidly expand. To cease Kurdish Separatist operations in the region, the government established village guards throughout the country and in 1987 due to the rising presence of the separatists and other underground groups, a State of Emergency was declared.

In 1995, a coalition between the Motherland Party under Mesut Yilmaz and the True Path Party under Tansu Ciller failed and two years later due to the support for religious policies, the military requested that Prime Minister Necmettin Erbakan of the Welfare Party resign, to which, due to their known ability to successfully stage coups, he did. Following this, the Welfare Party was banned, but it was simply reformed as the Virtue Party instead. Following a coalition government by the Motherland Party, the Democratic Left Party and the Republican People’s Party, the Democratic Left Party became the largest parliamentary party in the 1999 elections with the Nationalist Movement Party taking second place. The two parties formed a new government with the Motherland Party and despite not being completely harmonious, it was fairly effective in instating new human rights legislation and bringing about economic reform.


21st Century History

In 2002 the State of Emergency was finally dropped after the last of the Kurdish Separatist groups desisted, by this point their attacks and operations had claimed over forty thousand lives in just 15 years. A new election took place and the Justice and Development Party took power under Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the former Mayor of Istanbul. At the same time it began negotiations with the European Union

In 2007 the Justice and Development Party won the elections again for the third time and Abdullah Gul of the same party was elected President at the same time.

In 2008, members of Ergenekon, a supposed terrorist group, were detained and tried for terrorist attempts on government and civilians.

In 2010, over forty officers, including a general, two colonels, four admirals and numerous commanders of the Turkish navy and air force, many being retired, were arrested, tried and charged with attempted government overthrow in the Sledgehammer plot, although the navy and air force commanders were released only a few days later.

The economy since this time has been known to have been growing, with figures of 9% GDP growth in 2011.

In 2013, due to the removal of Taksim Gezi Park in Istanbul, protests began which quickly turned into government dissidence and saw widespread rioting across the country, especially in the cities of the formerly mentioned Istanbul as well as Ankara and Izmir. 

Wording
Phonetic
English
     
Selam Seh-lahm Hello/Hi
Elveda Elle-veh-dah Good Bye!
Konusmak Mi Ingilizce / Turkce Cohn-oo-smack Mee Eng-eel-eez-sey / Ter-sey Do you speak English / Spanish?
Benim Adim… Beh-nihm Ah-dihm My name is…
Bana Yardim Edebilir Misin? Bah-nah Yar-deem Eh-deh-bih-leer Miss-een Can you help me?
Ariyorum… Ah-ree-your-uhm I’m looking for…
Evet / Yok Ee-veht / Yock Yes / No
Tesekkur Ederim Teh-she-cur Eh-deh-eem Mr / Mrs / Miss
Bugun / Simdi Buh-guhn / Seem-dee Today / Now
Yarin / Dun Yar-een / Doon Tomorrow / Yesterday
Bu / O / Iste / Orada Boo / Oh / Ees-tey / Or-ah-dah This / That / Here / There

Phrases

Above are a few common Turkish phrases to help you get around. 

Languages

Around 85% of the country’s population speak Turkish as this is considered the country’s mother tongue and has always had longstanding origins in the country, being first spoken over 1300 years ago and brought in from Mongolia and originating in the Turkish Khaganate.

A further 12% speaks Kurdish and 1% more speak Arabic and Zaza. The country is home to some of the most endangered languages in the world including Abaza, Adyge, Gagauz, Homshetsma, Kabard-Cherkes, Mlahso, Romani, Turoyo, Western Armenian, Abkhaz, Cappadocian Green, Hertevin, Judezmo, Laz, Pontic Greek, Suret, Ubykh and Zazaki.
 

Religion

Turkey, despite having no official state religion and being considered a secular state, is predominantly Islamic, and over 96% of the country are Muslim, a further 3% are secular Muslims. The most popular sect of Islam in the country is the Hanafite school of Sunni Islam and the religion has over 80 thousand mosques across the Anatolian region.

Christianity is also fairly prominent in the country as well and around 0.2% of the country’s population follow this faith. It should also be noted that a fair amount of individuals of Jewish descent live and work in the country as well.

Museums, Galleries & Architecture

Turkey’s architecture frequently depicts old-world references and pays tribute to the now-fallen Ottoman Empire but is also influenced directly by other nearby European nations as well as Islamic Arabic cultural building styles as well. Mosques are widespread and come in variations such as the tiered, single-domed and subline-angled variants. Today, the biggest and most famous of these mosques include the Sultanahmet, Fatih, Mahmut Pasa and Bayezid II Mosques in Istanbul as well as Topkapi Palace.

Many buildings in the 15th to the 18th Centuries developed courtyards to existing structures and between the 18th and 19th Centuries, widespread westernization caused a more modern appearance to surface in many structures across the country; these developments are particularly visible in Dolmabahce Palace. Today, the region (and especially the major cities such as Istanbul), use new-style buildings like those across western cities like New York and Los Angeles in the US, and London in the UK.



Clothing, Dress Style & Etiquette

Although today most of the country conforms to either western-style clothing or Arabic robes, historically the dresswear was very unique to the Anatolian region and not seen elsewhere across the world, this has given rise to new styles and culture inherited from Turkish origins.

Men would often wear the Salvar (a type of trousers with a baggy middle), the Entari (a loose coat), the Fez (a type of hat) and the Yemeni (a type of sandal or shoe). Women’s clothing was often very similar but typically used a long dress worn either over the top of, or instead of, Salvar. In Aristocracy, it was common for the Caftan (a long type of coat or overdress) to be worn, often lined with expensive fur. In contrast, the middle class typically wore the Hirka (another type of long coat) and the lower class wore the Cepken (a type of collarless shirt) or the Yelek (a vest). The richest of the Aristocrats and the monarchy were often seen wearing rare stones and jewels adorned on their garments.

Literature, Poetry, Music & Dance

Turkish literature is comprised of a mixture of oral traditions and stories as well as written texts and prose, usually of Ottoman Imperial origin. The history of Turkey’s literature goes back well over 1,300 years but has only become united recently following the forming of the Republic of Turkey in 1923.

Much of the Anatolian region uses oral traditions to remember and recall stories and folk tales, often inspired by Islamic origins but sometimes varying with European influences. Some of the best examples of folktales are those surrounding Keloglan, a young man who attempts to repeatedly find a wife whilst keeping his mother’s house intact and dealing with the problems of neighbours, as well as Nasreddin, tales of a trickster who plays practical jokes on his neighbours.

Calendar & Events

On January 1st, New Years’ Day is celebrated. Following this in mid-March, the changing of the seasons during the Equinox is celebrated and then during the middle of April, National Sovereignty and Children’s Day is celebrated with a public holiday. In early May, Labour and Solidarity Day is celebrated and then in mid-May the Commemoration of Atatuk, Youth and Sports Days take effect and all grant the public several more public holidays.

Mid-June sees the June Solstice to celebrate the changing of the seasons, then around a week later Ramadan begins and lasting for four days the public is given several holidays. Victory Day is celebrated as the founding of the Republic in late August as another public holiday.

The September Equinox is celebrated in mid-September and then in early October for nearly a week, the Sacrifice Feast is celebrated. Then at the end of October, Republic Day Eve and Republic Day the day after are celebrated with two public holidays.

Finally, in the middle of December, the last Solstice is celebrated and at the end of December, New Years’ Eve is also celebrated. 

Located in central Istanbul, Club360 bursts into vibrant colours on the weekend with the club opening shortly before midnight and blasting out the hottest international tunes throughout the night. The club features some of the biggest DJ names across Europe and the rest of the world with Live performances and unique entertainment every event.

Opening over ten years ago in 2002, Reina is considered a venue of prestige and high-class across the globe, from the open-air club you get a perfect view of the Istanbul skyline as well as the nearby bridge, adding to a truly sublime atmosphere that’ll carry you into and through the night.

If you like your minimalistic yet technological setups then you’ll love Living Indigo; the club is located in Istanbul and features some of the wildest light shows across the country. Truly spectacular! Plus, the club utilizes a state-of-the-art sound system to ensure maximum vibes across the dance floor.

Located only minutes away from the Kurucesme shoreline, SuAda is located right on the waterfront and features a three-story mansion converted into a seafront open-air club. The club is known for its relaxed atmosphere and features some of the coolest and most refreshing drinks from across the continent.

Anjelique is widely renowned for its relaxed vibes and cool atmosphere and features some of the tastiest cocktails in the country. Combining this with a huge variety of food, the club allows one to truly experience Turkey’s finest while they drink and dance the night away.

Perhaps you prefer a wider variety of world music? How about Babylon? It offers some of the top musical artists in all genres from across the globe such as Reggae, Jazz, Electronic, World Music, Turkish, Latin, Rock, Indie Pop and Dance music and the club often features live concerts as well as premium-quality bar. 

Money

Turkey uses the Turkish Lira which can be divided down into 100 Turkish Kurus, the Turkish Lira uses the currency code TL or TRY and TRY 1 is equal to $0.48 or £0.28.

Coins come in 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 Kuru variants as well as in a 1 Lira variant.

Bank notes come in 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 200 Lira variants.

Economy

Turkey has an incredibly diverse economy and sees large industry in technology, clothing, automobiles, construction and oil. The CIA has classed Turkey as one of the world’s newly industrialized countries and it’s known as an emerging market economy to the IMF. With an economy worth $1.4 Trillion GDP, Turkey sees a 4% annual growth each year and mainly exports to Germany, Iraq, Iran, the United Kingdom and the United Arab Emirates. Its main import partners are Russia, Germany, China, the United States and Italy.

Within technology, Turkey’s biggest areas are in Insulated winding copper wire (1.7%), Colour Television receivers, monitors and projectors (1.5%) and Combined refrigerator-freezers (1.3%). Meanwhile the clothing sector sees more exportation of T-shirts, singlets and other cotton vests (2.7%), Female suits (1.9%) and Male suits (1.4%).

Automobile exports are most frequent in Snowmobiles and golf cars (5.1%), Dump trucks (3%) and Bumpers and parts (2.6%) whilst construction sees more exportation in Bars or rods of iron or non-alloy steel (2.7%), Rectangular alloy-steel bars (1.7%) and in oil the most frequent exportation is in Petroleum, bituminous, distillates and non-crude oil (2.8%).

Banking

Banks in Turkey are the mark of the 21st Century and are in-line with other western economies and countries with major banks from all around the world such as Citibank, HSBC and ING Bank all setting up shop in the country. ATMs are plentiful and you should have no issues outside of the city drawing out money, accounts come in two main varieties; Current Accounts and Savings Accounts.

Current Accounts give you your money when you need it and where you need it with no repercussions, but you won’t gain much interest from this account type. Savings Accounts, however, may place restrictions on when and how much you may withdraw, but in return offer higher interest rates to bolster your funds.

Taxes

Turkey utilizes four types of tax; Income Tax, Property Tax, Car Tax and VAT. All non-residents in Turkey are only expected to pay tax on their income earned in Turkey; residents whom stay for more than six continuous months are also regarded as limited taxpayers in the same way.

Income Tax is paid by all individuals whom stay in Turkey for more than six months in a calendar year and it is applied on their worldwide income. Non-residents only pay tax on income generated in the country. Couples are taxed separately. Income Tax is taxable on all incomes from Salaries, Business profits, Agricultural profits, Rental income, Income from any self-employment, Income from capital investment and any other income or earnings. Self-employed individuals pay a flat tax rate of 15% of their net profit.

Property Tax is paid annually on all buildings and land owed with rates ranging between 0.1% and 0.3%, tax is calculated based on the land and the building’s facilities and the size of the plot in square metres. However, those whom earn less than TL 3,600 ($1730 or £1020) annually through a rental property are exempt from Property Tax. Additional Tax is calculated and added based on the amount of water used by a property. Tax is also applied at a rate of 1.5% during any transfer of property and must be paid by both parties involved.

Car Tax is liable on all individuals with a vehicle registered to their name. It is payable annually and is calculated based on the vehicle’s production date, size of engine and the type of fuel used. Typically, the older the vehicle, the less tax is paid yearly.

Stamp Duty is added to most documents at a rate ranging between 0.15% and 0.75% based on the value of the document.

VAT is added at 18% typically but in some occasions can vary down to as low as 1%. 8% is typically applied to all basic foods, medical products and books, whilst 1% is applied to all agricultural products, some residential properties, newspapers and magazines. 

Due to its incredibly intimate geographical location, Turkey has one of the widest varieties of food from across the continent, combined with varying cultures and traditions that have been passed through the generations, distorted, altered, changed and remained untouched, the country sees a unique blend of Asian and European dishes of all sorts, shapes and sizes.

Meat is mainly eaten during special ceremonies or religious events but as of recent, a combination of ground meat and vegetables has become common. Among types of meat consumed are Veal, Chicken and Lamb. Eggs and Fish are also very common, with the latter being frequently consumed in coastal towns.


Fruit is incredibly cheap and varied in Turkey due to its high abundance and Turkish dishes often see the use of plums, pomegranates, apricots, raisins, currants, pears, vine leaves, grapes, apples, figs and many types of citrus fruits alongside meat and bread. Eggplants especially have a special place in Turkish cuisine.

Common dishes across the country include Menemen (egg, onion, tomato and green pepper soup with spices), Cilbir (poached eggs with yoghurt, often served with melted butter and aleppo pepper or paprika), Compote (fruit pieces in sugar syrup seasoned with vanilla, citrus fruit peels, cinnamon, cloves, almonds, coconut, raisins and/or candied fruit), Pilaf (rice cooked in seasoned broth, often mixed with onions and other vegetables), Cacik (seasoned and stained yoghurt) and Kebab (roasted and/or grilled meat, often skewered, served alongside other dishes). 

VISA Requirements

Citizens of Cyprus may enter and stay in Turkey for an unlimited amount of time without a VISA.

Citizens of the following countries may stay in Turkey for up to 90 days:

  • Albania
  • Andorra
  • Argentina
  • Belize
  • Bolivia
  • Brazil
  • Brunei
  • Bulgaria
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Ecuador
  • El Salvador
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Guatemala
  • Vatican City
  • Honduras
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Iran
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Jordan
  • Kosovo
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Lebanon
  • Libya
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Malaysia
  • Monaco
  • Montenegro
  • Morocco
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • Panama
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Romania
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • San Marino
  • Serbia
  • Seychelles
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Syria
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Tunisia
  • Uruguay
  • Venezuela
Citizens of the following nations may stay in Turkey for up to 60 days:
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Macedonia
  • Russia
  • Ukraine
Citizens of the following nations may stay in Turkey for up to 30 days:
  • Azerbaijan
  • Belarus
  • Costa Rica
  • Kazakhstan
  • Latvia
  • Macau
  • Mongolia
  • Tajikistan
  • Thailand
  • Turkmenistan
  • Uzbekistan
Additionally, citizens of the following nations may stay in Turkey for up to 90 days through the application of a multiple entry e-Visa:
Antigua and Barbuda
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Bahamas
  • Barbados
  • Belgium
  • Canada
  • Croatia
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • Grenada
  • Haiti
  • Hong Kong
  • Ireland
  • Jamaica
  • Kuwait
  • Maldives
  • Malta
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Oman
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Qatar
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Saudi Arabia
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
Citizens of Belarus may enter Turkey for up to 60 days through the application of a multiple entry e-Visa.

Citizens of the following countries may enter Turkey for up to 30 days through the application of a multiple entry e-Visa:
  • Armenia
  • Bahrain
  • Greek Cypriot Administration
  • Indonesia
  • Mauritius
Conditionally, provided that all entrants hold accommodation, at least US $50 per day to support them, hold a visa or residence in an OECD or Schengen country and hold a round-trip ticket to Istanbul Ataturk Airport with Turkish Airlines, citizens of the following countries may enter Turkey for up to 30 days with a single-entry e-Visa.
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Benin
  • Botswana
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cameroon
  • Cape Verde
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Comoros
  • Cote d’Ivoire
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Eritrea
  • Ethiopia
  • Gabon
  • Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Kenya
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Mozambique
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Republic of the Congo
  • Rwanda
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Swaziland
  • Tanzania
  • The Gambia
  • Togo
  • Uganda
  • Vietnam
  • Yemen
  • Zimbabwe
Conditionally, provided that all entrants hold accommodation, at least US $50 per day to support them and hold a visa or residence in an OECD or Schengen citizens of the following countries may enter Turkey for up to 30 days with a single-entry e-Visa.
  • Afghanistan
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Bangladesh
  • Benin
  • Botswana
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cameroon
  • Cape Verde
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • China
  • Comoros
  • Cote d’Ivoire
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Egypt
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Eritrea
  • Ethiopia
  • Gabon
  • Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • India
  • Iraq
  • Kenya
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Mexico
  • Mozambique
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Pakistan
  • Republic of the Congo
  • Rwanda
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Swaziland
  • Tanzania
  • The Gambia
  • Togo
  • Uganda
  • Vietnam
  • Yemen
  • Zimbabwe
Conditionally, provided that all entrants hold accommodation, at least US $50 per day to support them and hold a round-trip ticket to Istanbul Ataturk Airport with Turkish Airlines, citizens of the following countries may enter Turkey for up to 30 days with a single-entry e-Visa.
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Benin
  • Botswana
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cameroon
  • Cape Verde
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Comoros
  • Cote d’Ivoire
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Eritrea
  • Ethiopia
  • Gabon
  • Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Kenya
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Mali
  • Mauritania
  • Mozambique
  • Namibia
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • Republic of the Congo
  • Rwanda
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • Sudan
  • Swaziland
  • Tanzania
  • The Gambia
  • Togo
  • Uganda
  • Vietnam
  • Yemen
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe
Conditionally, provided that all entrants hold accommodation and at least US $50 per day to support them, citizens Moldova and Taiwan may enter Turkey for up to 30 days with a single-entry e-Visa.
Citizens of the following countries must obtain a visa in advance at one of the Turkish Diplomatic Missions:
  • Bhutan
  • Cambodia
  • Cuba
  • East Timor
  • Fiji
  • Guyana
  • Kiribati
  • Laos
  • Marshall Islands
  • Micronesia
  • Myanmar
  • Nauru
  • Nepal
  • North Korea
  • Palau
  • Palestine
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Philippines
  • Samoa
  • Solomon Islands
  • South Sudan
  • Sri Lanka
  • Suriname
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu
  • Vanuatu
Health Care

Over 76.3 Billion Turkish Lira ($36.5 Billion or £21.5 Billion) is spent each year on Health Care in Turkey according to the Turkish Statistical Institute, and around 80% of all funding comes from the Social Security Institute with the remainder coming directly from the public. In the country there are around 28 thousand medical institutions, roughly 1 doctor per 587 people and 2.54 beds per thousand people.

Recently Private Health Care has been given a large boost due to the large queues in Public Hospitals and due to this new competition the quality of Public Hospitals has dramatically risen. Health care is provided widely by the national pension system but around 2% of the country uses private health insurance.

The biggest health problems the country faces are infectious and parasitic diseases, cancer, heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases. HIV is practically non-existent in the country and only around 3,700 people are thought to be carriers of the disease (around 0.005%), with around 90% of cases of transmission through sexual activity and around 7% of cases through drug abuse.

Transportation

There are over 15 million road vehicles in Turkey, 7.5 million being cars, 2.4 million being small trucks, 2.4 million being motorcycles, 1.4 million being tractors, 700 thousand being trucks, 400 thousand being minibuses, 200 thousand being buses and 35 thousand being special purpose vehicles. The country makes use of over 427 thousand kilometres of road, around 178 thousand kilometres worth of these being paved, 300 kilometres of these being on bridges and 100 kilometres of these being through tunnels.

The country makes use of around 1.2 thousand kilometres worth of waterways and has ports all across the continent, including Hopa, Inebolu, Samsun, Tabzon and Zonguldak in the Black Sea, Gemlik, Bandirma, Istanbul, Izmit and Derince in the Sea of Mamara, Iskenderun, Mersin and Antalya in the Mediterranean Sea and Izmir in the Aegean Sea. These ports hold around 565 ships weighing over 1,000 tons including 262 cargo ships, 96 bulk carriers, 58 chemical tankers, 48 passenger and cargo ships, 32 petroleum tankers, 25 roll-on and roll-off ships, 7 liquefied gas ships, 4 passenger ships, 1 specialized tanker and 1 combination ore & oil ship as well as over 470 ships in foreign ports around the world.

Turkish State Railways makes up around 11 thousand kilometres of rail networks and runs daily regular trains between Ankara, Eskisehir and Konya. Plans for a rail tunnel under the Bosphorus straits and several high speed railroads are being constructed between Ankara, Istanbul and Konya. Additionally, several cities have underground railway systems including Ankara, Istanbul, Izmir, Bursa and Adana, and several foreign countries have rail links into Turkey including Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia, Bulgaria, Greece, Iran, Iran and Syria. Instanbul, Eskisehir, Ankara, Bursa, Adana, Izmir, Konya, Antalya, Kayseri, Gaziantep and Samsun also utilize light rail transit systems.

The country also has many thriving airways which use over a hundred airports, around 90 of which are paved, and 20 heliports.

Embassies

Embassies in Turkey include:
 
Afghani Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Afghanistan in Ankara, Turkey
Cinnah Caddesi, No. 88 Cankaya, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (00) (90) (312) 4422523
Fax: (00) (90) (312) 4426256
 
Afghanistan
Afghani Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Afghanistan in Istanbul, Turkey
Cumhuriyet cad. Umac Apt 141/147, Kat 5 Elmadag - Sisli Istanbul , Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0090212 343 87 22
Fax: 0090212 343 87 23
Website: http://www.afghanconsulateistanbul.com
Email: info@afghanconsulateistanbul.com
Office Hours: Mondays - Fridays from 9:00am to 2:00pm
Details: You can reach our new office on Mondays - Fridays from 9:00am to 2:00pm Passport applications days are Tuesday and Thursday. Visa applications days are Monday - Wednesday and Friday
 
Albania
Albanian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Albania in Ankara, Turkey
Ebu Ziya Tevfik sok. No. 17, Cankaya, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90 312 ) 4416 103 / 4
Fax: (+90 312 ) 4416 109
Email: embassy.ankara@mfa.gov.al
Office Hours: Mondays-Thursdays: 09.00AM-17.30PM Fridays: 09.00AM-15.00PM
Details: Ambassador: Mr. Genci Mucaj
 
Albania
Albanian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
General Consulate of Albania in Istanbul, Turkey
Ismet Inönü Cad. Deniz Apt. No:22 Kat:6, Gümüssuyu Mah. Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90) 212 244 32 56 / 7
Fax: (+90) 212 244 32 38
Email: consulate.istanbul@mfa.gov.al
Office Hours: 09:00AM-14:00PM
Details: Consul General: Mr. Ermal Muca
 
Algeria
Algerian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Algeria in Ankara, Turkey
Sehit Ersan Caddesi , NR 42 Cankaya
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 90 312 468 77 19, 90 312 428 80 37
Fax: 90 312 468 75 93
 
Argentina
Argentinian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Argentina in Ankara, Turkey
Ugur Mumcu Caddesi 60/1, 06700 Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90) 312 446-2061
(+90) 312 446-2062
Fax: (+90) 312 446-2063
Email: embarg@kablonet.com.tr,eturq@mrecic.gov.ar
Office Hours: 9:00 to 16:00
 
Armenia
Armenian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Permanent Representation of Armenia to the BSEC
Cumhuriyet Caddesi 87/10, kat 4 Elmadag-Taksin, Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (90) 212-225-6759
Fax: (90) 212-225-6759
Email: armmis@ttnet.net.tr
 
Australia
Australian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Australian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Ugur Mumcu Caddesi No: 88 , 7th floor , Gaziosmanpasa 06700 , Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 459 9550
Fax: (+90 312) 446 4827
Website: http://www.turkey.embassy.gov.au/
Email: anka.passports@dfat.gov.au
Office Hours: Monday to Friday 8.30am - 16.50pm (closed for lunch 12.30 - 1.30pm)
 
Australia
Australian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Australian Consulate-General in Istanbul, Turkey
16th Floor, Suzer Plaza, Elmadag Askerocagi Caddesi No. 15, Sisli, Istanbul 34367, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 212 243 1333
Fax: +90 212 243 1332
Website: http://www.turkey.embassy.gov.au/
Email: istanbul@austrade.gov.au
Office Hours: Monday to Friday between 08.30 and 17.00
Details: This post is managed by Austrade.
 
Australia
Australian Consulate in Canakkale, Turkey
 
Australian Consulate in Canakkale, Turkey
Ugur Mumcu 88 Kat 7 GOP
 
City: Canakkale
Phone: 0312 459 9500
Fax: 0312 446 4827
Website: http://www.turkey.embassy.gov.au/
 
Austria
Austrian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Austria in Ankara, Turkey
Ataturk Bulvari 189, 06680 Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90/312) 405 51 90 to 94
Fax: (+90) (312) 418 94 54
Website: http://www.aussenministerium.at/ankara
Email: ankara-ob@bmeia.gv.at
Office Hours: 09.00-12.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Adana, Turkey
 
Consulate of Austria in Adana, Turkey
SASA A.S, Tarsus Jolu, PK 371, 01322 Adana, Turkey
 
City: Adana
Phone: (+90) (322) 44 10 202
Fax: (+90) (322) 44 10 273
(+90) (322) 44 10 114
Email: nilufer.ozaltun@dupontsa.com
Office Hours: 08.30-12.00
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Bodrum, Turkey
 
Consulate of Austria in Bodrum, Turkey
Ataturk Cadessi No. 79, Kumbahce Mah., 48400 Bodrum, Turkey
 
City: Bodrum
Phone: (+90) (252) 357 76 88
Fax: (+90) (252) 357 75 05
Email: neyirsan@netscape.net
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Bursa, Turkey
 
Consulate of Austria in Bursa, Turkey
SKT A.S., Organize San Bölgesi, Yesil Cad. Nr. 17, 16140 Bursa, P.K. 90, 16159 Bursa Turkey
 
City: Bursa
Phone: (+90) (224) 243 4100
(+90) (224) 242 0818
Fax: (+90) (224) 243 4100
(+90) (224) 242 0818
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Austria in Istanbul, Turkey
Koybasi cad. No. 46, P.K.2, 34464 Yenikoy-Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90/212) 363 84 10 (Amt)
Fax: (+90/212) 262 26 22
Website: http://www.aussenministerium.at/istanbulgk
Email: istanbul-gk@bmeia.gv.at
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Consulate of Austria in Izmir, Turkey
Sehit Fethibey Cad. No: 55,, Heris Tower Is Merkezi K: 7/701, TR-35210 Pasaport-Izmir
 
City: Izmir
Phone: (+90/232) 446 55 44
Fax: (+90/232) 446 22 55
Email: caner@o-c.com.tr
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Mersin, Turkey
 
Consulate of Austria in Mersin, Turkey
Atatürk cad. 4302 sok., Toroglu apt. B Blk. 1. kat, Kultur mah., 33010 Mersin, Turkey
 
City: Mersin
Phone: (+90) (324) 231 36 06
Fax: (+90) (324) 238 55 82
Email: mersin@avusturyakonsoloslugu.org
 
Austria
Austrian Consulate in Trabzon, Turkey
 
Consulate of Austria in Trabzon, Turkey
Gazipasa Caddesi, Saruhan Is Merkezi No. 13/15 Kat:3/Daire:21, Kemerkaya Mahallesi, Trabzon, Turkey
 
City: Trabzon
Phone: (+90) (462) 326 28 36
Fax: (+90) (462) 321 57 89
Email: avusturyakonsolosluk.trabzon@bnet.net.tr
 
Azerbaijan
Azerbaijani Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Azerbaijan in Ankara,Turkey
Diplomatic Site, Baku Sokak 1, Oran, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 (312) 491 16 81, 82, 83
Fax: +90 (312) 492 04 30
Email: ankara@mission.mfa.gov.az
 
Bahamas
Bahamian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Bahamian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
Aydintepe Mahallesi, Tersaneler Caddesu 50, Sokak No:7, 34994, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90) 216 493 80 80
Fax: (+90) 216 393 12 78
Email: h.kemalyardimci@superonline.com
 
Bahrain
Bahraini Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Bahraini Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Likbahar Mah. 612 No.10 Oran, Cankaya, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90) 312 491 2656 / 8
Fax: (+90) 312 491 2676
Email: bahrainembassyank@bahembassyank.com
Office Hours: 09.00 - 15.30
 
Bahrain
Bahraini Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Bahraini Consulate General in Istanbul, Turkey
Fahrettin Kerim Gökay Cad. No:34, Altunizade 34662 Üsküdar, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90) 216 544 24 62 / (+90) 216 544 24 00
Fax: (+90) 216 544 24 18
Email: abdullah@eksim.com
 
Bangladesh
Bangladeshi Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Bangladeshi Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Birlik Mahallesi 391. Cadd No: 16, 06610 Çankaya, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90) (312) 495 27 19 / 20
Fax: (+90) (312) 495 27 44
Website: http://www.bangladootankara.org.tr
Email: bdootankara@ttmail.com
 
Bangladesh
Bangladeshi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Bangladeshi Consulate General in Istanbul, Turkey
Büyükdere Cad. No. 121, Ercan han Kat.5 Gayrettepe Mecidiyeköy, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90) (212) 347-5808 / 09 / 10
Fax: (+90) (212) 347-5816
Email: bdcgistanbul@ttmail.com / selka@selkakimya.com.tr
Office Hours: 09.00-17.00
 
Bangladesh
Bangladeshi Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Bangladeshi Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
Cumhuriyet Is Hani 1375 Sok. No:25-204, 35210 Alsancak, Izmir, Turkey
 
City: Izmir
Phone: (+90) (232) 464 30 02 / 3
Fax: (+90) (232) 421 47 36
Email: zerrin.cakmakoglu@hotmail.com / holidayturizm@yahoo.com.tr
 
Belarus
Belarusian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Republic of Belarus to the Republic of Turkey
Abidin Daver Sokak No. 17,, 06550 Cankaya, Ankara,Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (0312) 441 67 69 -70
Fax: (0312) 441 66 74
Website: http://www.turkey.belembassy.org/
Email: turkey@belembassy.org
 
Belgium
Belgian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Belgium in Ankara, Turkey
Mahatma Gandhi Caddesi, 55, Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: + (90) (312) 405.61.66
Fax: + (90) (312) 446.82.51
Website: http://www.diplomatie.be/ankara
Email: Ankara@diplobel.fed.be
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Belgium in Istanbul, Turkey
Siraselviler Caddesi, 39, 34433 Taksim - Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +(90)(212) 243.33.00
+ (90)(212) 243.20.68
+ (90)(212) 243.33.01
Fax: +(90)(212) 243.50.74
Website: http://www.diplomatie.be/istanbul
Email: istanbul@diplobel.org,consubelist@doruk.net.tr
Office Hours: Monday through Friday: 9 AM to 12 30 PM - 1 15 PM to 4 30 PM
Visa section: 9 AM to 11 30 AM - 1 30 PM to 3 PM
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Antalya, Turkey
 
Belgium Honorary Consulate Antalya
Yenigöl Mahallesi Serik Cad. No:64/2, Paloma Hotels, Turkey 07170
 
City: Antalya
Phone: +90 242 244 68 53
Fax: +90 242 341 44 11
Email: belgium@antnet.net.tr
Office Hours: 9:00-12:00 (Monday to Friday)
Details: Honorary Consul: Ece Tonbul Kilit Consulate Secretary: Sabine Diels
 
Belgium
Belgian Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Belgium in Izmir, Turkey
Ataturk Cad.N 174/1, Ekim Apt. Kat 5 Daire 10, Alsancak - , 35210 Izmir
 
City: Izmir
Phone: + (90) (232) 463.47.69
Fax: + (90) (232) 464.53.63
Email: nezihozture@ozture.com
 
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Bosnia- Herzegovina in Turkey
Turan Emeksiz Sok., Park Bloklari, B-Blok No. 3/9-10
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90-312) 427 36 02~3
Fax: (90-312) 427 3604
 
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Bosnian Embassy in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Embassy of Bosnia- Herzegovina in Turkey
Miralay Sefik Bey Sokak 19/6, Gumussuye, Taksim, Istanbul, 80090
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (90-212) 245 1616, 19
Fax: (90-212) 245 1620
 
Brazil
Brazilian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Brazil in Ankara,Turkey
Resit Galip Caddesi , Ilkadim Sokak N 1 , Gaziosmanpasa , 06700 ANKARA, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90-312) 448 18 40
Fax: (90-312) 448 18 38
Website: http://ancara.itamaraty.gov.br/en-us/
Email: brasemb@brasembancara.org
 
Bulgaria
Bulgarian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Bulgarian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Ataturk Bulvar1 No.124, Kavakl1dere, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 0090-312 467 20 71
0090-312 427 51 42
Fax: 0090-312/467 25 74
Email: bulemb@superonline.com
 
Bulgaria
Bulgarian Consulate in Bursa, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Republic of Bulgaria to the Republic of Turkey
Darmstad Cad. Uslu Sok. 3/2, Osmangazi, Bursa 16050
 
City: Bursa
Phone: +90 224 271 59 58
+90 532 264 6998
Fax: +90 224 253 00 11
Email: h.korkmaz@ttnet.net.tr
 
Bulgaria
Bulgarian Consulate in Tekirdag, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Republic of Bulgaria to the Republic of Turkey
Cum. Meydani Belediye Cad. Oral Pasaji No27, Tekirdag
 
City: Tekirdag
Phone: +90 282 261 94 87
+90 284 214 72 21
+90 282 651 85 82
+90 533 690 91 92
Fax: +90 282 261 94 87
+90 284 214 72 21
+90 282
Email: c.uslu@hotmail.com
 
Bulgaria
Bulgarian Consulate in Edirne, Turkey
 
Consulate General of the Republic of Bulgaria, Edirne, Turkey
22000, Talat pasa asfaltiNo 31, Edirne, Turkey
 
City: Edirne
Phone: 0090-284 / 214 06 17
Fax: 0090-284 / 214 84 82
Email: bulkonsedn@ttnet.net.tr,bulkonsedn@yahoo.com
 
Bulgaria
Bulgarian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of the Republic of Bulgaria, Istanbul, Turkey
Ahmet Adnan Saygun caddesi 34,, Ulus/Levent 2, Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0090-212 / 281 01 14/ 15/ 16
Fax: 0090-212 /265-10-11
Email: bulgconsul@superonline.com
 
Cambodia
Cambodian Consulate in Sariyer, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Cambodia in Sariyer, Turkey
Kambocya Fahri Baskonsoloslugu Park Plaza, Eski, Buyukdere cad.No. 22 Floor 17 Maslak, Sariyer
 
City: Sariyer
Phone: +90 (212)..., 366 5050, 366 5055
Fax: (+90 (212) 366 5086
Email: camhc.ank@mfa.gov.kh
 
Canada
Canadian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Canada in Ankara, Turkey
Cinnah Caddesi 58, Cankaya, 06690 Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (011 90 312) 409 2700
Fax: (011 90 312) 409 2712
Website: http://www.turkey.gc.ca
Email: ankra@international.gc.ca
 
Canada
Canadian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Canada in Istanbul, Turkey
Istiklal Caddesi, No. 189/5, Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey, 34433
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (011 90 212) 251 9838
Fax: (011 90 212) 251 9888
Website: http://www.turkey.gc.ca
Email: zeyda@mymerhaba.com
Office Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday 09:30 - 17:00, Friday: 09:30 - 13:00
 
Chile
Chilean Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Chile in Ankara, Turkey
Resit Galip Cad. Hirfanli Sok., 14/1-3, G.O.P. Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 90(312) 447 3418
90(312) 447 3582
90(312) 447 3664
90(312) 447 8163
Fax: 90(312) 447 4725
Website: http://www.chileturquia.com
Email: embassy@chileturquia.com
 
Chile
Chilean Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Chile in Istanbul, Turkey
Balmumcu - Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 90-212- 272 5760
90-212-272 7549
Fax: 90-212- 274 2282
Email: isthconschile@ttnet.net.tr
 
China
Chinese Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate-General of the Poeple's Republic of China in Istanbul, Turkey
Tarabya Mahallesi,Ahi Celebi Cad.Coban Cesme Sokak No.4, Sariyer, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0090-212-2992188
0090-212-2992634
Fax: 0090-212-2992633
0090-212-2992855
Website: http://istanbul.chineseconsulate.org
Email: chinaconsul_ist_tr@mfa.gov.cn
 
China
Chinese Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the People's Republic of China in the Republic of Turkey
Golgeli Sokak No. 34, 06700 Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 0090-312-4360628
Fax: 0090-312-4464248
Website: http://www.chinaembassy.org.tr/eng/
Email: chinaemb_tr@mfa.gov.cn
 
Costa Rica
Costa Rican Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Costa Rica in Istanbul, Turkey
Askerocagi CAD., Elmadag, Suzer Plaza, No. 9 , Sisli, 34367 Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 00 90 -212 - 334-46-46
Fax: 00 90- 212 -334-46-22
Email: costaricaconsul@istanbul.com
Office Hours: 9am - 4pm
 
Croatia
Croatian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Republic of Croatia in Ankara,Turkey
Kelebek Sokak 15/A, 06700 G.O.P - Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 0090 312 446 0831
0090 312 446 9460
Fax: 0090 312 446 4700
Website: http://tr.mvp.hr
Email: ankara@mvpei.hr
Office Hours: Working hours: Monday-Friday 9:00-16:00
Details: Covers Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan
 
Croatia
Croatian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of the Republic of Croatia in Istanbul, Turkey
Asmali Mescit Mah., Oteller Sok. No:1/2, 34420 Tepebasi/Beyoglu, Istanbul/TURKEY
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0090 212 293 5467
0090 212 293 5468
Fax: 0090 212 293 5476
Email: gkrh.istanbul@mvpei.hr
 
Croatia
Croatian Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Consulate of the Republic of Croatia in Izmir, Turkey
Sair Esref Blv. No:6/7, Samli Is Merkezi, Cankaya, 35 230 Izmir, Turkey
 
City: Izmir
Phone: + 90 232 446 2870
Fax: + 90 232 445 7720
Email: candancorbacioglu@ttnet.net.tr
 
Cuba
Cuban Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Cuba in Ankara, Turkey
Solen Sk. No. 8, Cankaya, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90/312) 442 8970
(90/312) 442 8970
Fax: (90/312) 441 4007
Website: http://emba.cubaminrex.cu/turquia
Email: embacubatur@tr.net
 
Czech Republic
Czech Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Czech Republic in Ankara, Turkey
Kaptanpa_a Sok. 15, G.O.P. Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 0090 312 / 4056139
Fax: 0090 312/ 446 3084
Website: http://www.mzv.cz/ankara
Email: ankara@embassy.mzv.cz
Office Hours: Monday-Thursday (8.30 a.m. - 5.00 p.m.), Friday (8.30 a.m. - 2.00 p.m.)
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of the Czech Republic in Istanbul, Turkey
Abdi 0pekci Cad. No: 71, , 34367 Macka, Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0090-212-2329046, 2309597
Fax: 0090-212-2319493
Website: http://www.mzv.cz/istanbul
Email: istanbul@embassy.mzv.cz
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic in Izmir, Turkey
Yali Caddesi No: 348/15, , 35220 Karsryaka/Izmir
 
City: Izmir
Phone: 0090 232/3680944
Fax: 0090 232/3680944
Email: izmir@honorary.mzv.cz
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 09.00 - 17.00
 
Czech Republic
Czech Consulate in Antalya, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of the Czech Republic in Antalya, Turkey
1385 Sokak No. 20, , TR-07100 Antalya
 
City: Antalya
Phone: 0090242/3226183
Fax: 0090242/3226182
Email: antalya@honorary.mzv.cz
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 09.00 - 19.00
 
Denmark
Danish Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Royal Danish Embassy in Turkey
Mahatma Gandhi Caddesi 74 , Gaziosmanpasha, 06700
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 446 61 41
Fax: +90 312 447 24 98
Website: http://www.ambankara.um.dk
Email: ankamb@um.dk
Office Hours: Mon.-Thur. 9.00-16.30, FRI. 9.00-13.00
 
Denmark
Danish Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Royal Danish Consulate General in Turkey
Meygede Sokak 2, TR-80810 Bebek
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 (212) 359 1900
Fax: +90 (212) 359 1901
Website: http://www.gkistanbul.um.dk
Email: istgkl@um.dk
 
Ecuador
Ecuadorian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Ecuadorian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
Seker Yildizi Sokak No. 33/11, Etiler 34337
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (0090) 212 352 6555
Fax: (0090) 212 3526550-
Email: ecuadorist@naplus.org.
 
Egypt
Egyptian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Egypt in Turkey
ATATURK BULVARI NO.126, 06680 KAVAKLIDERE ANKARA
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 09003124261026 / 00903124682240 / 00903124266132
Fax: 0090312- 4270099
Website: http://www.egyptturkey.com
Email: ankara@egyptturkey.com
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 09.00 a.m. - 04.00 p.m. Regular 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Visa
 
Egypt
Egyptian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Egypt in Istanbul, Turkey
Konaklar Mah. Akasyali Sok. No:26 - 4. Levent
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (0090212)3242133 - 3242160
Fax: (0090212) 3242204
Email: ecg_istanbul@yahoo.com
 
Estonia
Estonian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Estonia in Turkey
Golgeli Sok. No:16 , Gaziosmanpasa , 06700 Ankara , Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90 312) 40 56 970
Fax: (90 312) 40 56 976
Website: http://www.estemb.org.tr
Email: Embassy.Ankara@mfa.ee
Office Hours: The Embassy is open working days 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
 
Estonia
Estonian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul in Istanbul
Alternatifbank A.S., Cumhuriyet Cad. No. 46 , Elmada, Taksim/Istanbul , Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (90 212) 315 70 71, (90 212) 315 70 72
Email: tuncay.ozilhan@anadolugrubu.com.tr
 
Estonia
Estonian Consulate in Antalya, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul in Antalya
Akay Plaza , Aspendos Bulvari No. 274 , 07200 Antalya , Turkey
 
City: Antalya
Phone: (90 242) 312 00 01
Fax: 90 242) 321 88 41
Email: ethem@akaytour.com, estonia@akaytour.com
 
Estonia
Estonian Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul in Izmir
Baltali Ltd , 1203/4 str no 8 , 35110 Izmir , Turkey
 
City: Izmir
Phone: (90 232) 746 86 68
Fax: (90 232) 746 86 88
Email: esrefbaltali@baltali.com.tr
 
Finland
Finnish Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Finland in Turkey
Kader Sokak No:44,, 06700 Gaziosmanpasa, Postal Address: Embassy of Finland, P.K. 22, 06692 Kavaklidere
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-426 19 30
Fax: +90-312-468 00 72
Website: http://www.finland.org.tr/
Email: sanomat.ank@formin.fi
Office Hours: Office hours: mon-thu 8.30-13.00, 13.30-16.30 fri 8.30-13.00, 13.30-15.15 Customer services: mon-thu 10.00-12.00 (visa section). Customer service is closed on fridays and during Finnish and Turkish official holidays.
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate General of Finland in Istanbul, Turkey
Cumhuriyet Caddesi No: 111, Kat. 8, Elmadag 34437
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0212-296 9549
Fax: 0212-296 1291
Email: finconist@finconist.com
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Belek, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate General of Finland in Belek, Turkey
Honorary Consulate of Finland, Antalya Golf Club, Belek Tourism Center, TR-07500 Belek-Antalya
 
City: Belek
Phone: 90-242-7255970
Fax: +90-242-725 59 71
Email: ugurb@sirenegolfhotel.com, ugurb@antalyagolfclub.com.tr
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Bodrum, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Bodrum, Turkey
Honorary Consulate of Finland, Medicare Ozel Saglik, Tepecik Mevkii, Hamam Sok. No 4, Mugla
 
City: Bodrum
Phone: 90-252-316 7051
Fax: 90-252-316 7952
Email: info@medicare.com.tr
 
Finland
Finnish Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Finland in Izmir, Turkey
Honorary Consulate of Finland, Mopak Kaoyt Karton Sanayii ve Ticaret A.P., Kyrovasy Mevkii P.K.10, 35170 Kemalpaþa
 
City: Izmir
Phone: +90-232-877 02 35
Fax: +90-232-877 02 30
Email: mehmetalimolay@mopak.com.tr
 
France
French Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of France in Ankara, Turkey
Paris Caddesi n' 70 - Kavaklidere, 06540 Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: [90] (312) 455 45 00 / 455 45 45
Fax: [90] (312) 455 45 27 / 455 45 37 (section consulai
Website: http://www.ambafrance-tr.org/
 
France
French Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of France in Istanbul, Turkey
Istiklal Caddesi 8 - Taksim, 80090 Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: [90] (212) 334 87 30
Fax: [90] (212) 334 87 31
Website: http://www.consulfrance-istanbul.org/
Email: mail@consulfrance-istanbul.org
 
Georgia
Georgian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Georgia in the Republic of Turkey
Oran diplomatic site, Kilic Ali Street. N 12, Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +(90 312) 491 80 30/31
Fax: +(90 312) 491 80 32
Website: http://www.turkey.mfa.gov.ge/
Email: geoemb@ada.net.tr; ankara.emb@mfa.gov.ge
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 9:00am - 6:00pm
 
Germany
German Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
German Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
114 Atatürk Bulvari, Kavaklidere, 06540 Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (0090 312) 455 51 00
Fax: (90 312) 455 53 37
Website: http://www.ankara.diplo.de
Email: info@ankara.diplo.de
 
Germany
German Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
General Consulate of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Inonu Caddesi 16-18, Istanbul.
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (0090 212) 3 34 61 00
Fax: (0090 212) 249 99 20
Website: http://www.istanbul.diplo.de/
Email: info@istanbul.diplo.de
 
Germany
German Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
General Consulate of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Ataturk Caddesi 260, 35220 Izmir
 
City: Izmir
Phone: (0090 232) 488 88 88
Fax: (0090 232) 488 88 74
Website: http://www.izmir.diplo.de/
Email: info@izmir.diplo.de
 
Germany
German Consulate in Antalya, Turkey
 
Consulate of Germany in Turkey
Yesilbahce Mahallesi, (Yeni Narenciye Yolu), 1447 , Sokak, B.Gürkanlar Apt., Kat 5, No. 14, 07050
 
City: Antalya
Phone: (0090 242) 314 11 01, 314 11 02
Fax: (0090 242) 321 69 14
Website: http://www.antalya.diplo.de/
Email: info@antalya.diplo.de
 
Germany
German Consulate in Adana, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Paksoy A. S., Karatas Yolu No.: 184, 01120 Adana
 
City: Adana
Phone: (0090 322) 311 43 53, 311 48 30
Fax: (0090 322) 311 44 01
Email: ipaksoy@paksoy.com.tr
 
Germany
German Consulate in Bodrum, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Acikkirlar Mevkii Yeni Karsisi Zeytindali Sodak No: , 15, Bitez-Bodrum
 
City: Bodrum
Phone: (0090 252) 316 56 08, 316 48 02
Fax: (0090 252) 316 46 28
Email: gulay_kaman@hotmail.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in Bursa, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Ottomantur, Cemal Nadir Cad. 6/3, 16371 Bursa
 
City: Bursa
Phone: (0090 224) 221 00 21, 221 00 99
Fax: (0090 224) 221 89 48, 222 35 97
Email: honorarkonsul@ottomantur.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in Edirne, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Balikpazari Cad. Of Sitesi, C Blok D. 2, Kaleici, 22020
 
City: Edirne
Phone: (0090 284) 213 55 63
Fax: (0090 284) 213 10 61
Email: dursunoglu_ercan@hotmail.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in Erzurum, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Cumhuriyet Cad. 29/1, 25100 Erzurum.
 
City: Erzurum
Phone: (0090 442) 234 12 19, 235 22 50
Fax: (0090 442) 233 66 00
Email: ykuskay@yahoo.com, kuskay@ttnet.net.tr
 
Germany
German Consulate in Gaziantep, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Gazi Mahhallesi Zübeyde Hanim Bulvari No. 54/b, Sehitkamil, 27160 Gaziantep
 
City: Gaziantep
Phone: (0090 342) 336 14 00
Fax: (0090 342)336 14 02
Email: okara@selcukgroup.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in Kayseri, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Organize Sanayi Bölgesi 23. Cadde No.32, Kayseri.
 
City: Kayseri
Phone: (0090 352) 321 34 74
Fax: (0090 352) 321 36 76
Email: info@censoy.com
 
Germany
German Consulate in Trabzon, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of the Federal Republic of Germany in Turkey
Gazipasa Caddesi, Saruhan Ishani Kat 1, Trabzon.
 
City: Trabzon
Phone: ( 0090 462) 323 08 24
Fax: (0090 462) 323 28 27
Email: ihsanalioglu@superonline.com
 
Ghana
Ghanaian Embassy in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Embassy of Ghana in Turkey
Abide-i Hirriyet Cad. Mecidiyekvy Yolu No:268 Boyda Han
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 02122312181
Email: deniz.aksoy@turk.net
 
Greece
Greek Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Greece in Ankara, Turkey
Zia Ur Rahman Caddesi 9-11, 06700/G.O.P.
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (0090312) 4480647or 4480387
Fax: 4463191
Website: http://www.greekembassy.org.tr
Email: gremb.ank@mfa.gr
Office Hours: ---
Details: ---
 
Greece
Greek Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Greece in Istanbul
Turnacibasi Sokak 22, 34433 Beyoglu, Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (0090212) 3938290-2, 3938294
Fax: (0090212) 2521365
Website: http://www.mfa.gr/istanbul
Email: grgencon.kon@mfa.gr , grconsist@comnet.com.tr
 
Greece
Greek Consulate in Edirne, Turkey
 
Consulate of Greece in Edirne
Kocasinan Mah., 2 Sokak, No 13, Binevler-Edirne
 
City: Edirne
Phone: (0090284) 2355804
Fax: (0090284) 2355808
Website: http://grgencon.smy@mfa.gr
 
Greece
Greek Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Consulate of Greece in Izmir
Ataturk Caddesi 262, Alsancak-35220 Izmir
 
City: Izmir
Phone: (0090232) 4643160
Fax: (0090232) 4633393
Email: grgencon.smy@mfa.gr
 
Greenland
Greenlandic Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Royal Danish Embassy in Turkey
Mahatma Gandhi Caddesi 74, 06700 Gazi Osman Pasa, Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 (312) 446 6141
Fax: +90 (312) 447 2498
Website: http://www.ambankara.um.dk
Email: ankamb@um.dk
Office Hours: Monday to Thursday : 9:00 am to 4:30 pm Friday: 9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Details: The Faroe Islands and Greenland are part of the Kingdom of Denmark. As a main principle, the Danish Constitution stipulates that the foreign and security interests for all parts of the Kingdom of Denmark are the responsibility of the Danish government.
 
Greenland
Greenlandic Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Royal Danish Consulate General/Trade Commission in Turkey
Meygede Sokak 2, TR-80810 Bebek, Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 (212) 359 1900
Fax: +90 (212) 359 1901
Email: dtcistanbul@dtcistanbul.org.tr
Details: The Faroe Islands and Greenland are part of the Kingdom of Denmark. As a main principle, the Danish Constitution stipulates that the foreign and security interests for all parts of the Kingdom of Denmark are the responsibility of the Danish government.
 
Hungary
Hungarian Embassy in Cankaya, Turkey
 
Embassy of Hungary in Cankaya, Turkey
Sancak Mahallesi 1. Cadde No.46 Yildiz, Cankaya Ankara
 
City: Cankaya
Phone: 312-4422273
Fax: 312-4415049
 
India
Indian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of India in Turkey
77 A Chinnah Caddesi, Cankaya,, 06680
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 00-90-312-4382195-98
Fax: 00-90-312-4403429
Website: http://www.indembassy.org.tr/
Email: Chancery@indembassy.org.tr
 
India
Indian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of India in Istanbul, Turkey
Cumhuriyet Caddesi No. 18, Dortler Apartments, 7th Floor, Elmadag
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (90) 212 2962131, 2962132
Fax: (90) 212 2962130
Website: http://www.cgiistanbul.org
Email: cpv@cgiistanbul.org
 
India
Indian Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate General of India in Izmir, Turkey
Koyncuoglu Hahn Salhane, P.O. Box No. 372,
 
City: Izmir
Phone: +90-232-4614660
Fax: +90-232-4350549
 
Indonesia
Indonesian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia in Ankara, Turkey
Abdullah Cevdet Sokak No.10, PO Box-42, Cankaya 06680, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90) (312) 438 21 90
Fax: (90) (312) 438 21 93
Website: http://www.indo-tr.org
Email: indoank@marketweb.net.tr
Details: ---
 
Iraq
Iraqi Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of The Republic of Iraq in Turkey
Gaziosman pasa- turan emeksiz sok no.11,Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 0090312 - 4684834 / 0090312 - 4687421
Fax: 0090312 - 4684832
Email: ankemb@iraqmofamail.net
 
Ireland
Irish Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Ireland in Ankara, Turkey
Ugur Mumcu Caddesi No.88, MNG Binasi, B Blok Kat 3, Gaziosmanpasa 06700
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-459 1000
Fax: +90-312-459 1022
Website: http://www.embassyofireland.org.tr/
Email: ankaraembassy@dfa.ie
Details: Ambassador: His Excellency Tom Russell First Secretary: Padraig MacCoscair Third Secretary: Fiona Nic Dhonnacha
 
Ireland
Irish Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consul of Ireland in Istanbul, Turkey
Ali Riza Gurcan Cad, Meridyen Is Merkezi, Kat 4: No: 417, Merter
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 212 482 2434 (English); +90 212 482 1862 (Turkish)
Fax: +90 212 482 0943
Website: http://www.irlconsulist.com/
Email: jim@megamekanik.com
Details: Honorary Consul: Dr. James Geary
 
Israel
Israeli Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Israel in Ankara, Turkey
Mahatma Gandhi Street, 85 G.O.P, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-4597500
Fax: +90-312-4597555
Website: http://ankara.mfa.gov.il
Email: info@ankara.mfa.gov.il
Office Hours: Monday to Friday: 10.00 - 13.00
 
Israel
Israeli Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Israel in Istanbul, Turkey
Yapi Kredi Plaza, C Blok K.7, Levent
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (0090) 212 317 65 00
Fax: (0090) 212 317 65 55
Website: http://istanbul.mfa.gov.il
Email: info@istanbul.mfa.gov.il
Office Hours: Monday to Friday between 10.00 and 13.00
Details: Jurisdiction: Marmara, Eagean, Trakya, West Black Sea
 
Italy
Italian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Italy in Ankara, Turkey
Ataturk Bulvar1, 118, 06680 Kavaklidere , Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 4574 200
Fax: +90 312 4574 280
Website: http://www.italian-embassy.org.ae/ambasciata_ankara
Email: ambasciata.ankara@esteri.it
 
Jamaica
Jamaican Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Jamaican Consulate in Turkey
Harbiye Cad. No:283, Harbiye
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 00 90 212 549 07 00
Fax: 00 90 212 549 07 10
Email: jamaicanconsul@gmail.com
Details: HONORARY CONSUL: MR. MEHMET AYKUT EKEN
 
Japan
Japanese Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Japan in Ankara, Turkey
Japonya Buyukelciligi, Resit Galip Caddesi No. 81, Gaziosmanpasa, Turkey (P.O. Box 31-Kavaklidere)
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-446-0500
Fax: +90-312-437-1812
Email: culture@jpn-emb.org.tr
Office Hours: 9:30 ~ 12:00 14:30 ~ 17:30
 
Japan
Japanese Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Japan in Istanbul, Turkey
Tekfen Tower 10F, Buyukdere Caddesi No.209, 4. Levent 34394, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-212-317-4600
Fax: +90-212-317-4604
 
Jordan
Jordanian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Jordan in Ankara, Turkey
Mesnevi Dede Korkut Sok. No. 18, A. Ayranci, Ankara, 06690, 0090312
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 4404594- 4402054
Fax: 4404327
Email: ordembank@superonline.com
Office Hours: Monday - Friday: 9:00-3:00
 
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstani Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan in Ankara
066450 Kilik Ali sokak No6, , Or-An Diplomatik Sitesi Cankaya
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90312-491-91-00 or 446-12-65
Fax: +90312-491-44-55
Email: kazank@kazakhstan.org.tr
Details: Ambassador Bagdad K. AMREYEV
 
Kazakhstan
Kazakhstani Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of the Republic of Kazakhstan in Istanbul
Florya caddesi, , No 62 Senlikkoy, FLORYA
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90212-662-53-47
Fax: +90212-662-53-49
Email: consulkazist@gmail.com
Details: Consul-General Askar ZH. SHOKYBAYEV
 
Kuwait
Kuwaiti Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Kuwaiti Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Resit Galip Caddesi 110, Gaziosmanpasa
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90-312) 4450576, 4450580
Fax: (+90-312) 4466839
Email: kuwait@ada.net.tr
 
Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstani Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic in Ankara, Turkey
Murat Mah. Boyabat Sok. No:11, Eren Apt., Gaziosmanpasa, 06700 Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90-312) 4468408/9
Fax: (+90-312) 4468413
Website: http://www.kgembassy.org.tr/index.html
Email: kirgiz-o@tr-net.net.tr
Office Hours: Embassy - Mondays to Fridays (09:00-17:30)
 
Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstani Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
General Consulate of the Kyrgyz Republic
Lamartin Caddesi #7, Taksim, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90-212) 2356767, 2357474, 2353737
Fax: (+90-212) 2359293
Email: genkon@anet.net.tr
 
Latvia
Latvian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Latvian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Re_it Galip Caddesi, No.95 G.O.P. Çankaya, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 90312 405 6136; 90312 405 6138
Fax: 90312 405 6137
Email: embassy.turkey@mfa.gov.lv
 
Latvia
Latvian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Latvia
Bagdad Caddesi No:367/7, Erenköy, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90-216) 3025042, 3588298
Fax: (+90-216) 3026442
Email: latvia@netone.com.tr
 
Lithuania
Lithuanian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Lithuania in Ankara, Turkey
Lithuanian Embassy , Mahatma Gandi Cad. No. 17/8-9, 06700 G.O.P., Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90) (312) 447 07 66
Fax: (+90) (312) 447 06 63
Email: amb.tr@urm.lt
 
Macedonia
Macedonian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Republic of Macedonia in Ankara, Republic of Turkey
Karaca sokak 24/5-6, Gaziosmanpasha, Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 903 12 446 92 04; + 903 12 439 92 08
Fax: 903 12 446 92 06
Email: ankara@mfa.gov.mk
 
Madagascar
Malagasy Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Madagascar in Turkey
Büyükdere cad. Krak, 80300 Mecidiyeköy - Istanbul
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 212 211 9206
Fax: 212 211 7701
Email: aftuexportsuperonline.com
 
Malaysia
Malaysian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Malaysia in Ankara, Turkey
58, Mahatma Gandhi Caddesi, 06700 Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Republic of Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 90-312-4463547/4463548
Fax: 90-312-446 4130
Website: http://www.kln.gov.my/perwakilan/ankara
Email: malankara@kln.gov.my
Office Hours: Monday - Friday 09:00 am - 5.00 pm
 
Mexico
Mexican Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Mexico in Ankara, Turkey
Kirkipinar Sokak No. 18/6, 06540 Cankaya, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90-312) 442-3033/2382/2507, 441-9424/9454
Fax: (90-312) 442-0221
Website: http://www.mexico.org.tr/
Email: mexico@embamextur.com
Office Hours: Monday-Friday: 08:30 - 17:00
 
Moldova
Moldovan Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Moldova in Ankara, Turkey
Moldovan Embassy, Kaptanpasha Soc., 49, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90) 312.446.55.27
Fax: (+90) 312.446.58.16
Email: ambmold@superonline.com
Details: Ambassador: Mr. Victor Tvircun
 
Mongolia
Mongolian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Mongolia in Ankara, Turkey
Koza Sokak-109, G.O.P.,, Ankara 06700 Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 0090-312-4467977
Fax: 0090-312-4467791
Website: http://web.ttnet.net.tr/mogolelc/
Email: mogolelc@ttnet.net.tr
 
Morocco
Moroccan Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Morocco in Ankara,Turkey
Regitgalip Cad. Rabat Sok. No. 11, Gazi Osman Pasa, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90) (312) 437 6020 / 1
Fax: (+90) (312) 447 1405 or (+90) (312) 446 8430
Email: sifmatr@tr-net.net.tr
Details: Ambassador: Mr Abdallah Zagour
 
Nepal
Nepalese Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate General of Nepal
Vali Kongai Cad. Y.K.B. Ishain Kat: 4, Nisantasi
 
City: Istanbul
Fax: (+90-212) 2402199
 
Netherlands
Dutch Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Royal Netherlands Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Hollanda Caddesi 3, 06550 Yildiz, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (0312) 409 18 00 visa: (0312) 409 18 20
Fax: (0312) 409 18 98
Website: http://www.mfa.nl/ank-en
Email: ank@minbuza.nl
Office Hours: 08.30 - 17.00 hrs. on working days
 
Netherlands
Dutch Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Netherlands in Istanbul, Turkey
Istiklal Caddesi 197,, 34433 Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 (0212) 393 21 21
Fax: +90 (0212) 292 50 31
Website: http://www.mfa.nl/ist-en/
Email: ist@minbuza.nl
 
New Zealand
Kiwi Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
New Zealand Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Level 4, Iran Caddesi 13,, Kavaklidere 06700,, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 467 9054/6/8
Fax: +90 312 467 9013
Website: http://www.nzembassy.com/home.cfm?c=40&CFID=14549892&CFTOKEN=21129703
Email: nzembassyankara@ttmail.com
Office Hours: Mon-Thurs 0830-1730 Fri 0830-1630 (winter) Fri 0830-1330 (summer)
Details: Ambassador: Mr Hamish Cooper
 
New Zealand
Kiwi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
New Zealand Consulate-General Istanbul, Turkey
Inonu Caddesi No 48/3 Taksim, , 80090 Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 212 244 0272
Fax: +90 212 251 4004
Email: nzhonconist@hatem-law.com.tr
Details: Honorary Consul-General: Izzet Hatem
 
Norway
Norwegian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Royal Norwegian Embassy in Ankara
K1rkp1nar Sokak no. 18,, 06540 Cankaya
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 (312) 405-8010
Fax: +90 (312) 443-0544
Website: http://www.norway.org.tr
Email: emb.ankara@mfa.no, Visa - emb.ankara.immigration@mfa.no
Office Hours: Chancery Office Hours: Monday - Thursday: 08.30 - 16.30 Friday: 08.30 - 14.00 Visa Reception Visiting Hours Visa Reception: Monday - Thursday 09.00 - 12.00
Details: Ambassador: H.E. Madame Cecilie Landsverk
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General, Istanbul
Bilezik Sok. 4, 34427 F1nd1kl1,
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 (212) 249 97 53
Fax: +90 (212) 249 44 34
Website: http://www.norway.org.tr/Embassy/Diplomatic-Staff-and-Consulates/consulates/
Email: consulategeneral@norwayistanbul.com
Office Hours: Opening hours: Monday to Friday: 09:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. NB: The Consulate General in Istanbul will be closed from Monday November 15 to Monday November 22 due to the Sacrifice Bayram Holidays.
Details: Hon. Consul general: Mr. Selim Bilgisin
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Norwegian Consulate, Izmir
1378 Sok. 4/1 Kat. 2/201 Kordon Ishani, 35210 Alsancak,
 
City: Izmir
Phone: +90 (232) 421 92 80
Fax: +90 (232) 422 06 90
Website: http://www.norway.org.tr/Embassy/Diplomatic-Staff-and-Consulates/consulates/
Email: consulate@ttmail.com
Office Hours: Opening hours: Monday to Friday: 09:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m.
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Alanya, Turkey
 
Norwegian Consulate, Alanya
Konakli Kasabasi, 07490
 
City: Alanya
Phone: +90 (242) 565 03 30
Fax: +90 (242) 565 03 31
Website: http://www.norway.org.tr/Embassy/Diplomatic-Staff-and-Consulates/consulates/
Email: no.alanya@gmail.com
Details: Hon. Consul: Mr. Mustafa Nuvit Ozkan
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Antalya, Turkey
 
Norwegian Consulate in Antalya
Liman Mah. Akdeniz Cad. no. 262;, Aktur Apt., Kat. 4, D:11, 07070 Liman Kavsag1
 
City: Antalya
Phone: +90 (242) 259 00 83
Fax: +90 (242) 259 12 37
Website: http://www.norway.org.tr/Embassy/Diplomatic-Staff-and-Consulates/consulates/
Email: info@akis.com.tr
Office Hours: Opening hours: Monday to Friday: 08:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Iskenderun, Turkey
 
Norwegian Consulate in Iskenderun
Unsal Ishan1, Ataturk Bulvari, Kat. 1, P.K. 11, 31200
 
City: Iskenderun
Phone: +90 (326) 613 45 67
Fax: +90 (326) 614 02 34
Website: http://www.norway.org.tr/Embassy/Diplomatic-Staff-and-Consulates/consulates/
Email: norwayconsulateiskenderun@boutros.com.tr
Details: Hon. Consul: Mr. Emil Boutros
 
Norway
Norwegian Consulate in Marmaris, Turkey
 
Norwegian Consulate in Marmaris
Armutalan Uyum Sitesi No 40, 48700 Marmaris, Mugla
 
City: Marmaris
Phone: +90 (252) 417 47 90
Fax: +90 (0) 533 681 10 90
Website: http://www.norway.org.tr/Embassy/Diplomatic-Staff-and-Consulates/consulates/
Email: osmanlevend@gmail.com
Office Hours: Opening hours: Monday to Friday: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Details: Hon. Consul: Mr. Osman Levent Seral
 
Oman
Omani Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Sultanate of Oman in Ankara, Turkey
Mahatma Gandhi Cad, 63 Gazi Osman Basha
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (0090312) 4470 630 or 4470 631
Fax: 4470 632
Email: oman@marketweb.net.tr
Office Hours: 09:00 - 15:00 Friday 09:00 - 14:00
 
Pakistan
Pakistani Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan
P.O.Box 687, Iran Caddesi 37, Gaziosmanpasa, 06700
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90-312) 4271410/-4
Fax: (+90-312) 4671023
Email: pakinfo@net.tr
 
Pakistan
Pakistani Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan
Abid-e-Hurriyat, Cad. Gecit Sokak 11, Kat. 6, Hacionbasilar Is Hani Sisli, 80270
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90-212) 2335800/1
Fax: (+90-212) 2336802
 
Palestine
Palestinian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Palestine Embassy in Turkey
Filistin Sok No. 45, 06700 G.P. Pasa
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 90-312-4360823/24
Fax: 90-312-4377801
Email: empaltr@gmail.com
 
Philippines
Filipino Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Philippines in Ankara, Turkey
No. 56 Mahatma Gandhi Caddesi, Gazi Osman Pasa 06700
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (0090312) 446-5831; 447-0350
Fax: (0090312) 4465733
Email: ankara.pe@dfa.gov.ph / ankara_pe@yahoo.com / ankarape@gmail.com
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m
 
Philippines
Filipino Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Philippines in Istanbul, Turkey
Alarko Merkezi, Muallim Naci Cad. No. 113-115, Ortakoy 80840
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90) (212) 261-4522 or (+90) (212) 227-5200 to 15
Fax: (+90) (212) 260-2378 or (+90) (212) 227-0427
Email: daliaherzi@yahoo.com
 
Philippines
Filipino Consulate in Mersin, Turkey
 
Consulate of Philippines in Mersin, Turkey
Uray Caddesi 31, No. 3/2
 
City: Mersin
Phone: (+90) (324) 2331-666 or (+90) (324) 2313-691
Fax: (+90) (324) 2331-636
Email: diyab@superonline.com
 
Poland
Polish Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Poland in Turkey
Atatürk Bulvar1 N°241 Kavakl1dere PK-20 06-650
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 4572000
Fax: +90 312 4688301
Website: http://www.ankara.polemb.net
Email: ankara.amb.sekretariat@msz.gov.pl
 
Poland
Polish Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Poland in Turkey
Giz 2000 Plaza, Ayaza­a Köyü Yolu No: 7, K. 5 34389 Maslak
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90.212.290.6630
Fax: +90 212 290 66 32
Website: http://www.stambulkg.polemb.net
Email: stambul.kg.konsulat@msz.gov.pl
 
Qatar
Qatari Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the State of Qatar
P.O.Box 130, Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90-312) 4411364/6
Fax: (+90-312) 4411544
Email: ankara@mofa.gov.qa
 
Romania
Romanian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Romania in Ankara, Turkey
Bkres Sok.No.4, 06680 Ankaya
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (00) (90) (312) 4681290 or 4686005
Fax: (00) (90) (312) 4271530
Website: http://ankara.mae.ro
Email: romanyabyk@dsl.ttnet.net.tr; romanyabyk@dsl.ttmail.com
 
Romania
Romanian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Romanian General Consulate in Istanbul
Yanarsu Sokak No.42, Narin Sitesi, Etiler/Be_ikta_, Istanbul, Turkey, -
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0090-212-358 05 15
Fax: 0090-212-358 05 18; 358 05 19
Website: http://istanbul.mae.ro
Email: konsrom@doruk.net.tr
 
Romania
Romanian Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Romanian General Consulate in Izmir
strada 1479, nr. 9,, ALSANCAK, Izmir, -, -
 
City: Izmir
Phone: 0090 232 465 04 63
Fax: 0090 232 465 09 38
Website: http://izmir.mae.ro
Email: romconsizmir@ttmail.com
 
Russia
Russian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Russia in Ankara, Turkey
Embassy of the Russian Federation in the Republic of Turkey, Karyagdi Sok. 5, Cankaya
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 439-2122, 439-3518
Fax: +90 312 442-90-20
Email: rus-ankara@yandex.ru
 
San Marino
Sammarinese Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of San Marino in Istanbul, Turkey
Cumhuriyet Caddesi 295/3, Harbiye
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-216-4710879/(+90-212) 2385438
Fax: +90-216-3520554/(+90-212) 2385535
Email: bercis@morova.org
 
Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Saudi Arabia Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Turan Emeksiz Sok. No:6 Gazlosmanpsa, 06700
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-4685540 /+ 90-312-4685542
Fax: +90-312-4274886
Website: http://www.mofa.gov.sa/SaudiMissionsAbroad/SaudiEmbassiesAbroad/Asia/Pages/EmbassyID40938.aspx
Email: tremb@mofa.gov.sa
Office Hours: 9am-3pm
 
Serbia
Serbian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Serbia in Turkey
Paris Caddesi 47, P.K.28 Ka vaklidere, 06540
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-4260236 / +90-312-4262432
Fax: +90-312-4278345
Email: ambscgank@tr.net, yugoslav@tr.net
 
Serbia
Serbian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Serbia Consulate , Turkey
Serbian Consulate General Vali Conagi Cad. No.96/A - Nisantasi P.O.Box: P.K.549
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90) 212 219-26-53 ; (+90) 212 219-26-58
Fax: +90-252-4126137
Email: yugkist@37.com
 
Seychelles
Seychelles Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Seychelles Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
Yapi Kredi Plaza, C Blok Kat 13, 80620 Levent
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-212-325-2624/ +90.212.325.2624
Fax: (0212) 325.2620/ +90.212.325.2620
Email: altunc@destekfinans.com
Office Hours: Monday to Friday, 0900 - 1800
 
Singapore
Singaporean Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
General Consulate of Singapore in Istanbul, Turkey
Kazim Ozalp Sokak 28/8 Saskinbakkal, 34740 Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (90 216) 358 0133
Fax: (90 216) 350 8619
Website: http://www.singapore-tr.org/
Email: info@singapore-tr.org
 
Slovakia
Slovak Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Slovakia in Istanbul, Turkey
Aci Su Sokak, Arzu Ap. , No. 15/3,7
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90-212) 2273066
Fax: (+90-212) 2596072, 2274549
Email: gkistanbul@superonline.com
 
Slovenia
Slovenian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Slovenia Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Kupe Sokak 1/3 06700, Gaziosmanpasa
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-4056007
Fax: +90-312-4466887
Email: van@mzz-dkp.gov.si
 
Slovenia
Slovenian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Slovenia Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
Yapi Merkezi, Haci Resit Pasa Sokak No. 7 34676, Camlica
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-216-3219000
Fax: +90-216-3219013
Email: basar@ym.com.tr
 
South Africa
South African Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of South Africa in Ankara, Turkey
27 Filistin Street, G.O.P., 06700, Ankara, Turkey, Postal Add: P O Box 30 Kucukesat 06662 Ankara Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 405 6861
Fax: +90 312 446 6434
Website: http://www.southafrica.org.tr/
Email: general.ankara@foreign.gov.za
Office Hours: After-hours:          +90 532 558 1695 (English/duty phone for emergencies only)
 
South Africa
South African Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
South African Honorary Consulate General in Istanbul
Alarko Centre Muallim Naci Cad. No 69 Ortakoy, Istanbul, Turkey, -, -, -
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: + 90 212 227 5200
Fax: + 90 212 260 2378
Website: http://-
Email: ialaton@alarko.com.tr
 
South Africa
South African Consulate in Mersin, Turkey
 
South African Honorary Consulate General in Mersin
Olcar Tourism and Travel Agency Ataturk Cad, Yetiker Apt A Blok, No 82 Mersin 33010 Turkey , -, --, -
 
City: Mersin
Phone: + 90 324 237 1075
Fax: + 90 324 231 1079
Website: http://-
Email: nolcar@olcartour.com
 
South Africa
South African Consulate in Cigli, Turkey
 
South African Honorary Consulate General in Cigli
Ataturk Organize Sanayi Bolgesi 10008 Sokak No 1, Cigli - Izmir, 35620 Turkey, -, -, -
 
City: Cigli
Phone: + 90 232 376 8445
Fax: + 90 232 376 7942
Website: http://-
Email: tamertaskin@petrofer.com.tr
 
South Korea
Korean Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of The Republic of Korea in Ankara, Turkey
Alacam Sokak No.5, Cinnah Caddesi, Cankaya, Ankara 06690
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 - 312 - 468 - 4821/22/23, 467 - 7449, 427 - 1743
Fax: +90 - 312 - 468 - 2279.
Email: turkey@mofat.go.kr
 
Spain
Spanish Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Spain in Ankara,Turkey
Abdullah Cevdet Sokak, 8
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 438 03 92, 440 17 96 y 440 21 69
Fax: 439 51 70 & 442 69 91
Email: embesptr@mail.mae.es
 
Spain
Spanish Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Spain in Istanbul, Turkey
Karanfil Araligi Sok. no 16, 1 Levent, 80620
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90) 212 270 74 10 / 14 / 65
Fax: (+90) 212 270 74 84
Email: cgspestambul@mail.mae.es, consular2@superonline.com
 
Sudan
Sudanese Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Sudan in Turkey
Mahatma Gandi Gaddesi No:48, 06700 G.O.P - Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (0312) 446.6327-28
Fax: (0312) 446.8506
Email: sudankara@superonline.com
 
Sweden
Swedish Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Sweden in Ankara, Turkey
Katip Celebi Sokak 7, Kavaklidere, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 (312) 455 41 00
Fax: +90 (312) 455 41 20
Website: http://www.swedenabroad.com/ankara
Email: ambassaden.ankara@foreign.ministry.se
Office Hours: Monday-Thursday 8.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m, 1.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m., Friday 8.30 to 2 p.m. Visa (applications and processing): Monday-Thursday 8.30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Phone hours Monday-Thursday 11.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate-General of Sweden, Istanbul
Istiklal Caddesi 497, Beyoglu, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90 (0)212 334 0600
Fax: +90 (0)212 252 4114
Website: http://www.swedenabroad.com/istanbul
Email: generalkonsulat.istanbul@foreign.ministry.se
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 9.30 to 12.30 p.m. Visa (applications and processing): Monday-Thursday 9.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m., Fridays only collection of issued visas Phone hours Monday-Thursdag 2 to 4 p.m.
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Antalya, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Antalya
Konyaaltia Caddesi no 19/2, Bahcelievler, 07050 Antalya, Turkey
 
City: Antalya
Phone: + 90 (0242) 248 2950, 241 1069
Fax: + 90 (0242) 247 2619, 241 4316
Email: consul@turkcell.com; expres@kablonet.com.tr
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 09.30 a.m.-5 p.m.
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Izmir
1378 Sok, Kordon Is Hani 4/1, No 201, Alsancak, 352 10 Izmir, Turkey
 
City: Izmir
Phone: +90 (0)232 422 01 38
Fax: +90 (0)232 422 06 90
Email: consulate@superonline.com
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 09.30-12.30
 
Sweden
Swedish Consulate in Mersin, Turkey
 
Honorary Consulate of Sweden, Mersin
Cakmak Cad., 5309 Sokak, Mahmut Torun Ticaret Merkezi, K. 12, D. 46-47, 33050 Mersin, Turkey
 
City: Mersin
Phone: +90 (0)324 238 01 26
Fax: +90 (0)324 231 78 92
Email: mitas@mitas-mer.com.tr
Office Hours: Monday-Friday 9.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m.
 
Switzerland
Swiss Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Switzerland in Ankara, Turkey
Atatürk Bulvari No:247, P.K. 25, Kavaklidere, 06692
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-467-5555/+90-312-467-5556/+90-312-467-1198/
Fax: +90-312-467-1199
Website: http://www.eda.admin.ch/ankara
Email: vertretung@ank.rep.admin.ch
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Istanbul, Turkey
1.Levent Plaza, A-Blok Kat:3, Büyükdere Cad. No. 173 , 34394
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-212-2831282
Fax: +90-212-2831298
Website: http://www.eda.admin.ch/istanbul
Email: vertretung@ist.rep.admin.ch
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Izmir, Turkey
1380 Sokak, Alyans Apt. B. Blok K:3 D:6, 35220
 
City: Izmir
Phone: +90-232-4213049
Fax: +90-232-4220259
Email: yuce@gediknet.com, egev@efes.net.tr
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Antalya, Turkey
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Antalya, Turkey
c/o Pamfilya Tourism Inc., Isiklar Caddesi No. , 07100
 
City: Antalya
Phone: +90-242-2431500/+90-242-2431510
Fax: +90-242-2421400/+90-242-2421401
Email: antalya@pamfilya.com.tr
 
Switzerland
Swiss Consulate in Gaziantep, Turkey
 
Consulate of Switzerland in Gaziantep, Turkey
Ordu Caddesi No. 70 Kat. 1, 27060
 
City: Gaziantep
Phone: +90-342-3383114
Fax: +90-342-3360592
Email: hasanersoy@ixir.com
 
Syria
Syrian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of the Syrian Arab Republic in Ankara, Turkey
Abdullah Cevdet Sok. 7, Cankaya, 06680 Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90-312) 4389410, 4409657, 4400658
Fax: (+90-312) 4385609
 
Syria
Syrian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of the Syrian Arab Republic in Istanbul, Turkey
Macka Caddesi 59/5, Tesvikiye, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90-212) 2482735, 2326721
Fax: (+90-212) 2302215
 
Taiwan
Taiwanese Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Taipei Economic and Cultural Mission in Ankara, Turkey
Rabat Sok. No16, G.O.P. Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (002-90-312) 436-7255
Fax: (002-90-312) 447-8465
Email: tur@mofa.gov.tw
 
Tajikistan
Tajikistani Embassy in Ankar, Turkey
 
Embassy of Tajikistan in Turkey
M. Gandhi Cad 30
 
City: Ankar
Phone: +90-312-446-1602
Fax: +90-312-446-3621
Email: tajemb_turkey@inbox.ru
 
Tanzania
Tanzanian Consulate in Istambul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Tanzania in Istambul, Turkey
Min Kemal Oke CADDESI No. 10/4, 80 200 Nisantasi
 
City: Istambul
Phone: (+90-212)-2466142 / 2477261 / 2345679
Fax: +90-212-2345679
 
Thailand
Thai Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Thailand in Turkey
Royal Thai Embassy, Koza Sok. #87, 06700 Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90-312) 437-4318; 437-5248
Fax: (90-312) 437-8495
Email: thaiank@ttmail.com, thaiank@kablonet.com.tr
 
Tunisia
Tunisian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Tunisia in Turkey
Kuleli Sok.No:12
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-4377812 / +90-312-4377720
Fax: +90-312-4377100
Email: atunisa@superonline.com
 
Tunisia
Tunisian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Tunisia in Turkey
Cumhuriyet cd.169/1, Elmadag
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-212-2528619
Fax: +90-212-2528619
 
Turkey
Turkish Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Bulgarian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
Ahmet Adnan Saygun caddesi, Ulus/Levent
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: 0090-212 / 281 01 14/ 15/ 16
Fax: 0090-212 /265-10-11
Email: bulgconsul@superonline.com
 
Turkmenistan
Turkmen Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Turkmenistan in Ankara, Turkey
Koza Sokak 28, Cankaya, 06700 Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 (312) 4416122/3/4, 4397445, 4417126
Fax: +90 (312) 4417125
Email: tmilcilik@superonline.com
 
Turkmenistan
Turkmen Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate General of Turkmenistan
Gazy Everenos Caddesi Baharistan Sokak 13, Yesilkoy, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90-212) 6620221/2/3
Fax: (+90-212) 6620224
Email: turkmencons@escortnet.com
 
Ukraine
Ukrainian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Ukraine in Turkey
Sancak Mahallesi, 206 S, Sodak N. 17, Yiltiza, Cankaya, 06550
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (+90-312) 4415499, 4405289, 4421658
Fax: +90-312-4406815
Website: http://www.ukraineinfo.gov.ua/main
Email: ukremb_tr@kablonet.com.tr / emb_tr@mfa.gov.ua
 
Ukraine
Ukrainian Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Ukraine in Turkey
Adakale sokak 13, Senlikkoy, Florya-Bakirkoy
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (+90-212) 6637688, 6622541
Fax: +90-212-6621876
Website: http://www.ukraineinfo.gov.ua/main
Email: gc_tr@mfa.gov.ua, ukrist@superonline.com
 
United Arab Emirates
Emirati Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of United Arab Emirates in Ankara, Turkey
uran Gunes Blv. Yuksek Sancak Mah. 571 Cad. 608 Sok. No:3, Cankaya 06550 , Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-4901414
Fax: +90-312-4912333
Email: ankara@mofa.gov.ae
Office Hours: 09:00-15:00
 
United Arab Emirates
Emirati Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of the United Arab Emirates in Istanbul, Turkey
(P.O.Box PK 105, 80621 Levent), Zekak Elt Zeren, Villa No. 7, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-212-2782062/2796348
Fax: +90-212-2781570
 
United Kingdom
British Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
British Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
Sehit Ersan Caddesi No 46/A, Cankaya 06680, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 455 3344
Fax: +90 312 455 3356
Email: britembinf@fco.gov.uk
Office Hours: Monday to Friday, from 8:45 to 17:00 Consular section working hours Monday to Friday, from 09:00 to 12:30 and 14:00 to 16:15
 
United States
American Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
U.S. Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
110 Ataturk Blvd., Kavakl1dere, 06100 Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: (90-312) 455-5555
Fax: (90-312) 467-0019
Website: http://turkey.usembassy.gov/
Email: usembassyankara@yahoo.com, webmaster_ankara@state.gov
Office Hours: The American Citizen Services are provided between 14:00 and 16:30 pm Monday to Thursday. You may call (90) (312) 455 5555 or fax us on (90) (312) 466 5684. You need to make an online appointment before you visit Online Appointment System (Please do not call for any "Immigrant" or "Non Immigrant" visas related questions to the ACS unit! The ACS unit will not answer to visa inquiries.) The Immigrant Visa: (90 - 312) 455 5555 between 10:30 - 12:00 Mondays through Thursdays. Fax: (90-312) 468 6103 Non-Immigrant Visa: (90 - 312) 455 5555 between 16:00 - 17:00 Mondays through Thursdays. Fax: (90-312) 466-1586
 
United States
American Consulate in Adana, Turkey
 
American Consulate in Adana, Turkey
Consulate of the United States, Girne Bulvari No:212 Guzelevler Mah., Yuüregir, Adana - Turkey
 
City: Adana
Phone: Local number: (322) 346-6262, from outside Turkey, use the country and city codes: (90) (322)
Fax: (90) (322) 346-79-16
Website: http://adana.usconsulate.gov
Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on Turkish and American holidays.
 
United States
American Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
American Embassy in Istanbul, Turkey
U.S Consulate General Istanbul, 0stinye Mahallesi, Kapl1calar Mevkii No.2, Istinye 34460, Istanbul, Turkey
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: (90) 212-335 90 00
Email: amcongen1@tnn.net
Office Hours: Working Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 16:30 p.m.
 
United States
American Consulate in Izmir, Turkey
 
United States Virtual Presence Post
Ataturk Caddesi, No:126, 5th floor , 35210 Pasaport
 
City: Izmir
Phone: [90] (232) 441 24 46
Fax: [90] (232) 489 02 67
Website: http://izmir.usvpp.gov/index.html
Email: Izmir.Office.Box@mail.doc.gov
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Ankara, Turkey
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Turkey
Cinnah Caddesi 102/7 Cankaya 06550
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-440.94.00
Fax: +90-312-441.04.84
 
Uruguay
Uruguayan Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Uruguay in Turkey
Zeytinoglu Cadese Yeserti Sokak Hayat Ap. 1 15 Apto. 8
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-212-352 1067
 
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistani Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Uzbekistan in Turkey
Sancak mahallesi, 211 Sokak No3 06550 Yildiz-Cankaya
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-441-38-71
Fax: (90-312) 442 7058
Email: uzbekembassy@superonline.com
 
Uzbekistan
Uzbekistani Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey
 
Consulate of Uzbekistan in Turkey
Sehit Halil Ibrahim Caddesi, No 23 Istinye
 
City: Istanbul
Phone: +90-212-323-20-37
 
Venezuela
Venezuelan Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Venezuela in Turkey
Cinnah Caddesi No. 78/2 Cankaya, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90-312-439-3198 / +90-312-438-7135
Fax: +90-312-447-7953
Email: embveank@ttnet.net.tr, embankara2@hotmail.com
 
Vietnam
Vietnamese Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Vietnam in Ankara, Turkey
Koza Sokak No 109. Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: 090 312 - 446 8049
Fax: 090 312- 446 5623
Website: http://www.vietnamembassy-turkey.org
Email: dsqvnturkey@yahoo.com
 
Yemen
Yemeni Embassy in Ankara, Turkey
 
Embassy of Yemen
Mahmut Yesari Sok No 10 Cankaya, Ankara,, Turkey
 
City: Ankara
Phone: +90 312 4476861
Fax: +90 312 4475545
Email: uaeemb@superonline.com

Phone Lines

The telephone services in Turkey are run primarily by Turk Telekom, which also provides mobile services alongside 3G Access. Other prominent telephone companies include Turkcell, Vodaphone Turkey and Avea and together all companies see over 70 million subscribers with over 91% of the nation on the wire. Satellites for mobile communications are run through Turksat but also use connections from Eutelsat, Inmarsat and Intelsat alongside cable and submarine cable systems to establish international connections.

Internet

The most widely used internet service in Turkey is Turk Telekom’s TTNET ADSL2+ service with speeds between 1Mbit/s and 100Mbit/s being available for purchase. However, many other ISPs include SmileADSL, Biri, Superonline, Uydunet, Turk.net, Millenicom, Pttcell, Pocell and Bimcell, which offer similar services. It’s believed that there are over 27.3 million users. The top code for the country is .tr.

Recently though, many of these ISPs have come under scrutiny due to ‘fair use’ policies which are known to limit users’ broadband speeds for various reasons, as early as a week into a month. It’s also important to mention that numerous websites and services have been censored by the courts over the years and includes a flat widespread block of all pornography nationwide.

Communications

Over 50% of homes in Turkey use Satellite TV with most Satellite TV services provided through Digiturk, D-Smart and Turksat. Public channels number around fifteen with private channels adding over 55 additional channels. Of these the most popular channels are ATV, Kanai D, Show TV, Fox TV, Star TV, Samanyolu TV, Kanal 7, TRT 1 and Kanalturk, which make up over 55% of all viewing time.

There are over 1100 radio stations in Turkey, most of these which use long wave, medium wave and FM band for domestic broadcasting whilst short wave is reserved for international broadcasts, however, some private companies prefer the FM band for international broadcasts as well. 

Weather & Climate

Due to Turkey’s geographical location on several seafronts with a vast central region, the climate varies dramatically from area to area. The coastal areas bordering the Black Sea have a temperate Oceanic climate, the areas bordering the Mediterranean Sea have a temperate Mediterranean climate and the areas bordering the Sea of Marmara have a mix of the two. Meanwhile the central region tends to have harsher Arid conditions.

For example, in Istanbul on the Marmara coastline tends to have moderate summers with warm winters and can see temperatures rising up to 29 degrees Centigrade (84.2 Fahrenheit) between the summer months of June and September, but they can drop as low as 3 degrees Centigrade (37.4 Fahrenheit) in the winter months of December to February. Precipitation sees a gradual increase and decrease throughout the year, with as little as 30mm in the summer months and as much as 120mm in the winter months.

Antalya sees much hotter temperatures on the Mediterranean coastline, rising as high as 35 degrees Centigrade (95 Fahrenheit) in the summer months of July to August, and hitting a very warm 6 degrees Centigrade (42.8 Fahrenheit) or higher in the winter months of December to February. Rainfall is dramatic and dynamic in the region, with the lightest rain (less than 5mm) being in the summer months and the heaviest rain (up to 270mm) in the winter months.

Zonguldak on the Black Sea coastline is colder, with temperatures only getting up to 25 degrees Centigrade (77 Fahrenheit) in the summer months of July to August, and dropping as low as 3 degrees Centigrade (37.4 Fahrenheit) in the winter months between January and March. Rainfall sees little variation, with the heaviest precipitation at around 150mm during the autumn months and the lightest rain being at 50mm in the spring months.

The extremes are found in the mainland, with Sanliurfa in Southeastern Anatolia soaring as high as 39 degrees Centigrade (102.2 Fahrenheit) in its summer months of July to August, and Erzurum in Eastern Anatolia having temperatures as low as -15 degrees Centigrade (5 Fahrenheit) in its winter months of December to February. Rainfall in both of these regions can be extremely light all year around, never rising above 80mm in the winter months (which is the heaviest season) and falling below 5mm in the summer months (which is the lightest season).


Holidays

The Gloria Golf resort in Antalya features quick-access to the beach via the bridge over the Acisu river and is located within the pine forests at the feet of the Taurus Mountains. The resort entails a professionally-run baby club for 1 to 3 year olds, a mini club for 4 to 7 year holds and a kids club for 8 to 12 year olds to ensure that all the family is catered for.

With the Antalya airport located only nine kilometres away and the city itself only slightly further, the Club Hotel Sera in Lara features over 540 guest rooms and allows its guests full access to all four swimming pools, a sauna, a steam room, a Jacuzzi, a massage room and the hotel’s very own private beach.

The Goldcity Tourism Complex is situated perfectly just five minutes from the beach and 30 minutes from Alanya’s city centre but still offers its guests a range of entertainment including 14 massage rooms, a 100% authentic Turkish bath, a range of saunas and steam rooms, a fitness centre, numerous relaxation areas and several Jacuzzis as well as a range of sporting facilities such as bowling, volleyball, mini golf, billiards, water sports and more.

Perhaps you’d prefer a more relaxed getaway? The Fantastia Hotel Deluxe is just the destination for you! Located right in the small town of Camyuva in Kemer, the hotel features exclusive access to a luxurious beach, spa and pool facilities and a range of stunningly beautiful gardens. But fear not! The hotel also features several bars and restaurants and is only ten kilometres away from Antalya.

Less than 600 metres away from the nearest sandy beach, the Garden of Sun Hotel features close proximity to the resort centre of Altinkum and boasts a wonderfully tranquil atmosphere combined with a strikingly dynamic yet gorgeous landscape. The hotel features a multitude of restaurants, cafes, bars and entertainment for its guests.

The Surmeli Efes Hotel is located in one of Turkey’s most popular holiday destinations, Kusadasi, and entails a range of beautiful beaches and over 400 lightly furnished, incredibly welcoming rooms. The hotel itself even features a private beach and offers a range of distinctive cuisine combined with a range of facilities open for its guests including a gymnastics room, basketball, volleyball and tennis courts and swimming pools with Jacuzzis. 

A child requires no additional measures to be taken to enter the country that a regular adult would not need to undertake.

A maximum of two animals may be imported into the country completely free of charge, beyond that, all animals are treated as commercial and so various import procedures apply and a Control Document (SPS) issued by the General Directorate of Protection of Control (GDPC) will be required.

All animals must have their own individual health certifications issued by an accredited veterinarian that must have examined the animal no more than 96 hours before travel. All certifications must declare the animal to be healthy without sign of contagious/infection disease. It’s recommended, but not enforced, that all animals have a standard ISO-compatible microchip for identification. The following documents are also required and must be stamped by the Agriculture Department of the country of origin:

  • International Veterinary Health Certificate
  • Vaccination Certificates
  • Identification Card
Dogs must be vaccinated against DHLPP, Canine Parvovirus, Leptospirosis, Hepatitis, Canine Distemper and Rabies, with the latter administered at least a month before traveling. The Pitbull Terrier and Japanese Tosa breeds may not be imported into the country.
Cats must be vaccinated against Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, Panleukopenia and Rabies, with the latter being administered at least a month prior to travel. The cat must also be at least four months old.

All animals must be vaccinated no more than six months and no less than 15 days before traveling. 

Education in Turkey has been shown to be incredibly effective and since being established during the Ataturk Reforms following 1924, there has been almost a 100% enrolment rate of all children in the country in public or private education. Over $14 Billion is spent each year on Education in the country and compulsory education lasts 12 years for students between the ages of 6 and 18 and recently the Turkish government has been seeking to enhance this with the aid of computer technology in all public schools across the country.

Pre-primary education can begin for children as young as 3 and lasts until they turn 6. Institutions for children of this age include a range of independent nurseries, kindergartens, practical classes, day cares and child care houses. It’s known that over 260 thousand children are educated each year in this way and over 15,000 teachers are employed in over 11,000 institutions. It should be noted that Pre-primary education is not compulsory.


Primary Education lasts between the ages of 6 and 14 and is compulsory for all children between these ages but is completely free of charge as well. The first three grades teach four core subjects which include Turkish, Maths, Life Knowledge and a Foreign language (Usually English but also commonly German, French, Spanish or a combination of two or more). At the fourth grade, Life Knowledge is replaced by Science and Social Studies. The first four grades are usually called ‘First School, 1st Level’ while the next four grades are referred to as ‘First School, 2nd Level’. At Grade 8, Social Studies is replaced by History and Citizenship. It’s important to note that Private Schools usually teach a higher level of foreign language skills than Public Schools. Across Primary Education, over 11 million students are educated and over 400 thousand teachers are employed in over 35 thousand schools annually.

Secondary Education lasts for another three years after Primary School and to enter, the system varies each year as well as from school to school and region to region. Exams are most frequently required to enter but there can be as many as 3 exams per year or just a singular exam for all three years, and sometimes it’s just about previous grades. The main subjects focused on in Secondary Education are the Turkish Language, Mathematics, Science and Foreign Languages, but these are often broken down further into more specialist areas and examined individually. Each year in Secondary Education, over 2.5 million students are educated and over 140 thousand teachers are employed in over six thousand institutions across the country. 

To work in Turkey as a teacher, you will require at least a Bachelor’s Degree in education or in a subject relevant to your position. Additionally you will require a teaching qualification and will need at least two years of experience (it should be noted that candidates with international experience will be preferred).

Our clients only request Native English Speakers with Western Training (US, UK, Canada, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa). Although a TEFL Qualification is not considered a teaching qualification, it still improves your chances of securing a position.

Make sure to see our guide to Visa and Work Permit Restrictions

Costs in Turkey are cheaper when compared to other European nations, with a litre of milk costing around TRY 2.10 ($1 or £0.60), 500g of bread costing TRY 1.10 ($0.50 or £0.30), 12 eggs costing TRY 4.40 ($2.10 or £1.30) and 1 litre of water costing around TRY 0.70 ($0.30 or £0.20). Furthermore, a meal in a restaurant will set you back anywhere between TRY 11 and 50 ($5.30-$24 or £3.10-£14.20).

More luxurious items will set you back a little more, however, as cigarettes are worth TRY 9 ($4.30 or £2.60), a litre of beer will set you back TRY 8.70 ($4.20 or £2.50) and a bottle of mid-range wine will cost you up to TRY 24 ($11.50 or £6.80).


Rent is comparable, with a 1 bedroom apartment in the city centre costing around TRY 850 ($410 or £240), a 1 bedroom apartment outside of the city centre costing around TRY 500 ($240 or £140), a 3 bedroom apartment in the city centre costing around TRY 1,400 ($670 or £400) and a 3 bedroom apartment outside of the city centre costing around TRY 830 ($400 or £235). 

The Kalkan Dive centre features staff trained with PADI to an instructor level in the US and takes divers of all skill levels to the most avid veteran to the shiest beginner down to the depths to see the beautifully clear waters of Kalamar Bay along with many of its inhabitants including barracuda, octopi, sea turtles and more.

Perhaps you’re more a sword-in-hand person? Well en guarde! The Fencing Club of Eskisehir Demir was founded in 1936 and continues to grow and compete at a professional-level to this day, they welcome new recruits at any time, regardless of skill level.

Besiktas JK features a variety of differing sports clubs that both teach and practice these sports to the highest calibre, the sports include (but are not limited to) Football, Basketball, Volleyball and Handball. 

Turkey’s biggest issues with Crime are those through honour killing (murdering due to what the murderer believes to be a just cause) and gang activity. Within the last ten years, over 24 thousand people have been arrested by Turkish Police, of these, over 8600 were due to involvement in gangs.

Turkey’s other problem is with torture instated by law enforcement officials on prisoners and arrestees. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch and the European Committee for the Prevention in Torture has condemned these actions but has stated that they believe that as of recent, procedures have been set in place to prevent these incidents from happening.

Emergency Numbers

  • Medical & Fire: 110
  • General Emergency: 112
  • Police: 155
  • Tourism Police: (0212) 527 45 03