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About

Officially known as the State of Qatar and run as a monarchy by the Al Thani royal family, the country occupies a peninsula by the same name on the north-east coast of the Arabian Peninsula and has only a single land border with neighbouring country Saudi Arabia located to the south. Surrounded by the Persian Gulf, it’s only a single strait that separates this country from the island state of Bahrain.


The country has notable natural gas reserves and has made itself one of the richest nations in the world with diplomatic use of both these and other smaller oil reserves. The country uses a mix of civil and Islamic law to regular its citizens appropriately and has made a string of huge developments in the hopes of hitting its goals in its own National Vision 2030, which it is expecting to achieve a fully sustainable economy. Notable events in the country in the near future include the FIFA World Cup 2022.

Stone Age History

Dating back as far as 50,000 BC, the remains of settlements and encampments along the coast have been found as well as sites for working flint. Additionally, pottery from the Mesopotamian and northern Arabian cultures of Al Ubaid has been found in the region that matches this date. It’s believed that these cultures, as well as the Dilmun civilization from Bahrain, were the original inhabitants of the land.

Bronze Age History

The Dilmun and Al Ubaid cultures were believed to still be present in the region during this time.

Iron Age History

The twin cultures considered to exist on through the Iron Age and rock carvings, burial mounds and a large town have been found in Wusail, just 20km north of Doha, that date within this time period (about 500 BC). At this time many nomadic tribes originating from Al Hasa and Najd in Saudi Arabia moved through Qatar with many encampments used for water sources, pearling and fishing being set up.

1st Century – 15th Century History

Starting in the 8th Century AD, the Abbasid Caliphate, second largest of the Islamic caliphates, began to settle in the area and built notably large settlements, notably Murwab. The Abbasids continued to rule the country until the early 16th Century where the Portuguese moved into the country.

16th Century – 19th Century History

In 1538, the Portuguese were defeated and forced out of the country by the Ottoman Empire which took over rule. Upon the fall of this empire, the Al Bin Ali clan migrated back into the country from Kuwait and resettled in Zubarah. This settlement was placed strategically next to the oyster banks which in turn drew in a variety of merchants from Kuwait and more so Basra, seeking a new home for the one that had been occupied by the Persian Empire.

As a result of this mass immigration, the area became a thriving pearling and trading center. Following this in the late 18th Century, the city of Doha developed out of the smaller town of Al Bida with its population generated from an amalgamation of both nomadic and settled Arabs as well as a large amount of slaves brought over from Africa.

In 1782, the Al Bin Ali branch of the Bani Utbah Tribe and the Army of Nasr Al-Madhkur, Ruler of Bahrain and Bushire, went to battle over Zubarah. Following the attacks on the city, the Al Bin Ali defeated the Persian Army in Bahrain and drove them back, liberating the country completely. Due to the liberation of Bahrain, a variety of families and tribes migrated to Muharraq, the country’s capital, including the Al-Fadhill, Al-Noaimi, Al-Sadah, Al-Thawadi, Al-Sulaiti, Al-Mannai and Al-Ma’awdah.

Conflict, however, continued into the 19th Century, involving the Al Jalahima and Al Jalahima clans as well as the Ottomans, the Omanis, the Wahhabis and the Iranians. However, following the end of the conflict, the British made their presence known as they drew their eyes over India and the surrounding region. Through the efforts of the East India Company and the Sheikhs in the UAE, Bahrain and the surrounding areas, the General Maritime Treaty of 1820 was implemented and safe passage for ships was ensured.

However, it was only assumed that Qatar, as a dependency of Bahrain, was agreed to follow this treaty. Qatar’s natives had other ideas and continued their piracy on the East India Company’s ships, due to these efforts, one of the East India Company’s vessels turned and bombarded the city of Doha in 1821, reducing it to rubble, despite the majority of the residents having no part in the piracy whatsoever. Following this attack, Qatar once again came under attack by a large Bahraini force which looted Al Wakrah and Doha in 1867, Qatar of course wasn’t about to take this sitting down and counterattacked shortly afterwards.
These attacks prompted Colonel Lewis Pelly, British Politician, to draw up a peace treaty between the Bahraini and Qatari forces, and, after resolving the conflict with the treaty, Qatar was recognized as its own nation alongside its own now-recognized leader, Mohammed bin Thani.

Mohammed bin Thani opposed the Ottoman Empire’s hold on Qatar and although his son, Jassim bin Mohammed, privately agreed with him, his son hoped that with Ottoman support he could become dominant over any Sheikh in any other area which dared oppose him as well as retake the town of Az Zubarah.

Ironically, Jassim bin Mohammed and his brother Ahmed bin Muhammed destroyed the town in 1878 as retaliation of the piracy of the Naim, a tribe loyal to the Sheikh of Bahrain despite making residence in Qatar. Furthermore, due to Jassim bin Mohammed’s refusal to permit an Ottoman Customhouse in Doha, the Ottoman Empire sent a military force out to arrest him. Jassim bin Mohammed’s supporters, however, defended him and drove the Ottoman force out of the city.

20th Century History

Officially drawing their forces out of Qatar in 1913, the Ottomans renounced their sovereignty and three years later the current ruler of the emirate, Abdullah bin Jassim Al Thani, signed a treaty with Great Britain which brought it into the Trucial system alongside the United Arab Emirates and other regions local to the Gulf. This meant that in return for military protection by the British Military, the regions had to agree not to sell any land or make any agreements with any other foreign nation.

Despite the British peace-binding treaty, Abdullah bin Jassim was not secure in the unsteady peace with Bahrain and the Wahhabis, asking time and time again for money, weaponry and military support from Britain, which were repeatedly denied due to the British’ disinterest in inland affairs between the Arabic nations. However, it was only a short while later that due to the high demand for oil, disputes over land between nations intensified and the need to settle national borders was realized.

It was at this time that the pearl trade collapsed and the great depression hit in full swing, making the countries desperate for economically viable resources. In 1922, the first boundary shift took place as Sir Percy Cox, British Representative, saw through Major Frank Holmes’ affair of an oil concession with Ibn Saud and had the border drawn which separated the Qatar Peninsula from the mainland.

Following this, Bahrain claimed and successfully legally obtained a group of islands off of the west coast of Qatar including the island of Hawar. Britain sided with Bahrain despite Abdullah bin Jassim’s objections. They pushed their claims further as they once again took over Az Zubarah in 1937, however, this time Qatar responded by sending a very large military force to the town which drove out the Bahraini forces completely. Due to the leader of Bahrain, Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa, losing Az Zubarah, he grew bitter towards the nation of Qatar and imposed a powerful embargo on trade and travel to Qatar.

The first oil strike occurred in 1940 at Jebel Dukhan but it was halted only two years later due to World War II and the resulting aftermath of the war. This disruption as well as the lack of supplies, food and other resources drove the country into a state of desperation with their economy collapsing. Due to this economic pressure, a large amount of Qatari families migrated out into other parts of the Persian Gulf. The debt Abdullah bin Jassim was under combined with the desertion of his nation drove him into retirement and his son, Ali bin Abdullah Al Thani, was scheduled to be ruler.

However, Hamad bin Abdullah’s sudden death in 1948 lead to a succession crisis between Abdullah bin Jassim’s other two sons, his eldest, Ali bin Abdullah Al Thani, and his grandson, Hamad bin Abdullah’s son, Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani. Qatar was not down and defeated yet as they began to export oil in 1949, drawing in huge amounts of revenue and beginning to transform the economy. Abdullah bin Jassim also agreed to the British and agreed to abdicate his position in return for support for his son, Ali bin Abdullah, who became the ruler of Qatar in 1949.

Starting in the 50’s, the country developed its public services and structures under the wing of the British government. At first unwilling to share power, Ali bin Abdullah became less reluctant as he realized he was unable to control striking oil drilling groups, renegade sheikhs and the country’s financial difficulties without the assistance of the British. The first budget was drawn up in 1953 by a British Adviser and by the end of the following year there were forty-two Qatari government agents.

Qatar drastically improved upon previous standards. Public communications and services developed in leaps and bounds with the first power plant in 1957, the first desalination plant in 1954, the first telephone exchange in 1953. These were included with many other developments including a police headquarters, a customs warehouse, an airstrip and a jetty. Due to the pan-Arabism political movement and demonstrations which strongly opposed the western Capitalist principles, Ali bin Adbullah invested further support into the then-British-run Police force following the protests and marches in 1956.

Of course, the revenue generated by the oil wells also caused concern over its spending. Ali bin Abdullah was often criticized for his glamorous lifestyle and free spending of the country’s money on a hunting trip in Pakistan and a villa in Switzerland as well as his allowances to those in close proximity and seniority to himself. Many other non-senior sheikhs, branches of the Al Thani and discontent Qatari nationals believed that they deserved more and that Ali bin Abdullah’s spending was over-indulgent and fruitless.

At the start of the 60’s, Ali bin Abdullah abdicated his position and handed the reins to his son, Ahmad bin Ali, despite Khalifa bin Hamad being named heir apparent in 1948. However, Khalifa bin Hamad retained considerable power as deputy ruler and often stepped in for Ahmad bin Ali when the latter had spent time outside of the country. The first act of Ahmad bin ali was to increase funding for the sheikhs and adult male Ali Thani, this in turn caused the resentment felt by non-government supporting forces to grow and after a fatal shooting by one of Ahmad bin Ali’s nephews in 1963, the groups formed the National Unity Front.

Calling a general strike, the group demanded that the ruler’s privileges be rebuked, the extravagant spending on luxuries be minimized and that social services and trade unions be properly funded and recognized.  Ahmad bin Ali’s response was to jail fifty leading individuals and to exile the front’s leaders. However, he did institute some small reforms as well as providing land and loans to poorer Qatari nationals. Later on in the 60’s, the country developed its economic prowess with small-scale agriculture, a national fishing company and a brand new cement factory. In 1968, Britain announced it planned to pull its military units out of Suez, as well as withdrawing their commitments to the surrounding areas militarily.

After talks with the other nations of Bahrain and the Trucial Coast over forming a federation, disputes between Khalifa bin Hamad and Ahmad bin Ali over Bahrain’s attempts to become the senior partner in the federation. Calling the first Council of Ministers, Khalifa bin Hamad’s argument prevailed in regard to the proposal of the federation and Ahmad bin Ali approved provisional constitution in 1970, declaring Qatar an independent Islamic Arab state governed by Sharia law. Khalifa bin Hamad was appointed prime minister the month following this governmental shift and later on that same year Qatar announced its position as in independent state.

However, the announcement was made by Ahmad bin Ali from his private villa in Switzerland rather than from his palace in Doha, outraging the public. With the support of the Qatari populace, the Al Thani family, the British government and the financial and military support of Saudi Arabia, Khalifa bin Hamad deposed Ahmad bin Ali and became ruler of Qatar. He quickly set about restructuring finances and government spending, cutting family allowances severely and increasing spending on social services and development projects in the housing, health, pension and education sectors.

By 1993, Khalifa bin Hamad had begun regularly consulting with his son, Hamad bin Khalifa, also the heir apparent and minister of defense, who had also taken over a lot of the country’s developments and government practices. Two years later, Hamad bin Khalifa staged a coup d’état and successfully took over control of the country. A counter-coup d’état by Khalifa bin Hamad failed a year later but the two reconciled shortly afterwards, despite some supporters of the counter-coup remaining in prison. 

21st Century History

Shortly after coming into power, the now Emir Hamad bin Khalifa announced his vision of a democratic Qatar and permitted an increased amount of freedom for the press as well as municipal elections to precede parliamentary elections. It was at this time that the dispute over the Hawar Islands between Qatar and Bahrain, the International Court of Justice gave Bahrain sovereignty over the islands but Qatar was given several smaller disputed islands as well as the Zubarah region. For the very first time in 2003, a woman was appointed to the cabinet as the Minister of Education and also for the first time, the public referendum approved a new constitution in 2003 which was fully instigated in 2005. Throughout the noughties, the country has reformed its economy, social system and democratic values further.

In 2013, Emir and Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani handed over power to his son, the-now-Emir-and-Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani. Qatar is expected to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup and is building a multitude of stadiums and facilities as well as upgrading prior structures to help support this event. 

Wording
Phonetic
English
     
Salam Sah-lam Hello/Hi
Ma a salama
 
Mah ah sah-lah-mah Good Bye!
Hal tatakallamo alloghah al Enjileziah / Alarabiah? Hahl tah-tah-kah-lah-moh ahl-oh-gah ahl Ehn-jill-ehz-ee-ah / Ah-lah-rah-bee-ah Do you speak English / Arabic?
Esmee… Ehz-mee My name is…
Hal beemkanek mosa’adati Hahl beam-kah-nehk moh-sah-ah-dah-tee Can you help me?
Abhatu an… Ahb-hah-too ahn I’m looking for…
Na’am / Laa Nah-ahm / Lah Yes / No
Assayed / Assayedah / Al Anesah Ah-say-ehd / Ah-say-ehd-ah / Ahl Ah-ney-sah Mr / Mrs / Miss
Alyawm / Al aan Ahl-yorm / Ahl Ahn Today / Now
Ghadan / Albareha Gah-dahn / Ahl-bah-reh-ah Tomorrow / Yesterday
Haza / Zalek / Huna / Hunak Hah-zah / Zah-lek / Hoo-nah / Hoo-nahk This / That / Here / There

 


Phrases

Above are a few common Arabic phrases to help you get around.

 

Languages

Like many of the other countries in the Gulf region, Qatar’s national language is Arabic with Qatari Arabic as the local dialect. However, English is also widely spoken and is in high demand in Qatar’s business sectors for communication between members of its growing expatriate community.

Lesser spoken but still prevalent languages in the country are French, Hindi, Malayalam, Urdu, Tamil and Tagalog.

Religion

Qatar is an Islamic nation and, with Sunni Islam being the predominant denomination (but also many Shia Muslim communities are present), around 65% of the nation’s population is considered to be Muslim, but this figure seems to be slowly dropping each year. Meanwhile, around 15% of the country’s inhabitants are considered to be Christian of varying denominations (mainly Roman Catholics, Anglicans, Copts, Mar Thoman and Indian Orthodox) which appear to be slowly increasing each year.

Additionally, around 15% of the population follow Hinduism, around 4% are Buddhist and the remaining 1% follows other smaller religions or are Atheists. These have also all been on the rise in recent years alongside Christianity.

Museums, Galleries & Architecture

Noted collectors of both contemporary and Islamic art, the Al Thani family are famous for opening several museums such as the Museum of Islamic Art (opened in 2008 and widely considered to be one of the greatest museums in the world) and the projected Guggenheim and Louvre of Qatar. Qatar is also known for being the largest buyer of art in the world by value.

Opposite the Museum of Islamic Art is the MIA Park which contains a 280,000 square meter seafront in a crescent shape, it includes a sculpture plaza and three kilometres of lighted pedestrian pathways shaded by palm trees as well as a kiosk and two cafés. Additionally, the country contains the Mathaf Arab Museum of Modern Art in Doha’s very own Education City, it contains over six-thousand works of art and regularly holds exhibitions to help engage the academic, art, local and international communities.

Also planned is the National Museum of Qatar which will use a contemporary interlocking disk design to shield visitors from the desert sunlight, the Qatar Olympic & Sports Museum which will preserve, investigate, store and exhibit sports-related objects of the Arab world, and the Orientalist Museum which aims to map the Oriental art from around the world and exhibit them accordingly. 

Clothing, Dress Style & Etiquette

Both men and women in the region are expected to dress in a non-provocative way but the dress code is purely driven by customs rather than by government order, as well as being considered more relaxed than other Arabic nations. It is important to mention that in recent years western-style clothing has become far more widespread and acceptable.

Qatari women traditionally wear an Abayah (a long black colored body clothing) and a Shayla (a long black scarf used to cover the head) but also sometimes the Hijab (a black head cover). Older women are also known to wear a Djelabia (a type of long dress) and Sirwal (baggy ankle-length trousers) and may choose to obscure their face with a Shaila (a type of thin scarf) or a Battula (a mask made of reflective calico).

Men traditionally wear the Thoub (a long white or lightly coloured body covering), young boys may wear the Gahfeya (an embroided cap) and older men frequently wear a Ghutra (a folded square cloth worn on the head) and a black coil. During winter it is common for wear to include a Fahrwa (a heavy camel hair or woollen cloak).

It’s also common to have various types of henna (body embroidery) applied in a vast array of patterns traditionally on the hands, arms, feet and ankles.

Literature, Poetry, Music & Dance

Music in Qatar is traditionally based on poetry of the Bedouin people as well as the associated songs and dance. Contemporary music however is a modernization of this and is called Khaliji. Another common music type is the Fann at-Tanbura and includes a ritual often performed with the genre.  Belly Dancing and Hasbraki, sort of like Belly Dancing but with a faster tempo and movements, are also extremely popular. 

Instrument-wise the Tabl, Murwas, Al Ras and Tar, types of drums and tambourine, respectively, are used for more folk music and during festivals and the Oud and Rebaba, types of stringed instrument, are used for clearer tunes. Bagpipes from Scotland have also become increasingly popular in recent decades. Dance during these festivals includes the Ardah or Ardha, a type of dance used to display a lot of energy performed by men with swords and sticks, usually accompanied to by drums and Arabian Flutes. Another type of dance, the Khanmary, is performed by a group of women in masks typically at weddings.


Calendar & Events

Qatar regularly celebrates other Arabic traditional holidays and such like many other Islamic regions such as Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates, these typically include Islamic Religious Holidays such as Ramadan, Eid ul-Fitr and Eid ul-Adha. However, Qatar also had its own string of public holidays including Qatar National Day on December 18th, National Sports Day which falls on the second Tuesday of every February and Independence day on September 3rd


Doha in Qatar has a thriving nightlife that comprises of some of the best lounges, clubs and pubs in the Gulf, below are some of our favourites:

CloudNYN is considered more on the affordable clubs in the city and caters to the younger crowd, it’s famous for letting in couples and women for free whilst single men have to pay QR 50.

Smart, suave and positively slick, the Pearl Lounge Club has one of the best cocktail-mixing reputations in town and is especially reputed on its signature drink, the Cosmopolitan.

Buried deep under the Ramada Hotel & Suites, the Qube features a range of talented DJs from all over the world including London’s very own Ministry of Sound and regularly organizes nights for dance, Indian and hip-hop music. 

Seven 7 has been given that smooth and sophisticated look that is reserved only for the best clubs in the world and features a sparkling white style reminiscent of deep futurism, it also features several plasma screens and smoke machines.

Feel like a more relaxed night out? The Sky View Bar is located on the 15th floor of La Cigale and is based on a balcony. Despite the deep chilled out vibe output by the design, the bar also houses a range of skilled DJs.

Maybe you feel a little homesick and could use more familiar surroundings? You’ll love the Irish Harp which has been fashioned like a traditional European Pub and serves a range of tasty food and thirst-quenching drinks.

Designed to take its appearance right out of some of America’s grandest metropoli, the Madison Piano Bar is a smooth and chilled out environment fashioned for those good nights out with some close friends.

For a more traditionally Arabic theme, the Wahm is based next to the W Hotel and features a pool, mezze snacks and a variety of oriental décor, ideal for hot days out when you need a cool drink. 

Money

Qatar uses the Qatari Riyal (QAR) which can be divided down into 100 Dirham but it has only been using this for the last 50 years and before 1966 it used the Indian Rupee and the Saudi Riyal. At one point it also shared its value with the Dubai Riyal but since 1973 the two are no longer linked.

Qatari Riyal comes in the form of 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 Dirham coins as well as in 1, 5, 10, 25, 50, 100 and 500 Riyal bank notes. Typically the Qatari Riyal has an exchange rate of QAR 1 to $0.27 or £0.17.

Economy

Making up more than 70% of total revenue in the country, Petroleum is the absolute cornerstone of the Qatari economy. However, natural gas reserves also make up a significant proportion of the Qatari economy with the country owning the third largest natural gas reserves in the world.

Qatar is undeniably the richest country in the world with current GDP per capita growing more than 1,150% during the 70’s, over 50% in the 80’s and over 90% in the 90’s. Prior to the 40’s when the oil and gas fields began being exploited, Qatar was a pearl fishing country and one of the poorest countries in the world.
Experts predict that Qatar’s oil fields will be mostly depleted by 2023 but the natural gas reserves are expected to hold out for significantly longer. The average wage per hour in Qatar is at around QAR 220 (about $60 or £36).

Banking

ATMs are available throughout Doha but in the lesser developed areas of Qatar may not be so available. Banks will typically charge a fee to use another bank’s ATM and both rent and wages are paid via post-dated cheques, among other large bills and cash amounts.

You’ll need a reference letter from your employer which states your salary and their approval for you to open an account, a Passport with copies and often a Residency Permit. Very similarly to the United Arab Emirates, Qatar’s banks generally offer three types of bank account.

The Current Account type is used for everyday banking and typically has no monthly fee as long as around QAR 3000 (about $825 or £500) is maintained in the account’s balance.

The Savings Account type pays out a higher amount of interest but only allow a certain amount of free-withdrawals before a nominal fee is charged, normally a balance of QAR 5000 (about $1,375 or £830) is required to be maintained.

Finally, a Fixed Deposit Account is the other common type which has been optimized for long-term saving and pays out a much higher rate of interest, but requires around QAR 20,000 (about $5,495 or £3,315) to be maintained in the account’s balance.

Taxes

Qatar does not impose any income tax on citizens and only a foreigner owning and operating a business within Qatar needs to pay any tax at all. There is no road tax, car tax, television licence fee, council tax or VAT in Qatar at all but it is rumoured that around five to seven percent VAT may be introduced in the future, although this has yet to be officially confirmed.

However, some statutory fees apply to certain transactions and services, including an import tax on all products brought into the country intended for commercial resale at four-to-five percent of the value of the goods, a service tax on food and drink purchased in hotels at seven percent and a flat corporate tax of ten percent applicable to all profit made by any business owned or partially owned by foreigners in Qatar. 

The State of Qatar enjoys a wide variety of tasty food and meals which are typically made with all-natural ingredients. Commonly, the food has been inspired, influenced and brought in from Iran, India and North Africa but the country supports many traditional dishes such as Crab, Tuna, Red Snapper, Shrimp and Lobster seafood.


Also famous for many lamb and mutton dishes, all meat served in the country is halal in accordance with Islamic Sharia Law and has been prepared as such. These lamb and mutton dishes are commonly served with yoghurt made from goat or cow milk. The grown foods also include dates, almonds and sour applies as well as Machbous, a stew of heavily spiced rice with the aforementioned meat, seafood or both. 

Qatar also includes many other incredible dishes such as Hummus, a dip made from chickpeas, flour and sesame Seeds, Taboulleh, cracked wheat flavoured with mint and parsley, Biriani, another rice dish with a lot of spices and served with lamb and/or chicken and Ghuzi, a full roast lamb on top of rice and nuts. 

VISA Requirements

Visitors to Qatar require a VISA unless they are either a citizen of a GCC Country or another eligible country which include:

  • Bahrain
  • Kuwait
  • Oman
  • Saudi Arabia
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Or are a citizen of a country eligible for a VISA on arrival, these countries include:
  • Andorra
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Canada
  • Denmark
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Liechtenstein
  • Luxembourg
  • Malaysia
  • Monaco
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • San Marino
  • Singapore
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Vatican City

Citizens of Belarus and Turkey may also obtain a one-month VISA on arrival provided enough money is held on a credit card.

To obtain a VISA, you’ll typically need:
  • Two original passport-sized photos
  • A VISA application form to be completed online, then printed, signed and one of the two photos attached.
  • An original passport valid for at least six months prior to the date of travel with at least one blank page.
  • Original bank statements for the last three months with a photo copy of each.
A non-passport holder must provide proof of residency for the nation you are travelling from. 

Health Care

Comparable to other highly developed countries, Qatar has an internationally recognized high quality health care system which is available to all inhabitants of the nation, offering the most advanced medical equipment and most highly trained staff from across the Middle East.

The system is regulated by the Supreme Council of Health in the Emirates which was established in 2005 which helps to supervise and quality check all hospitals and services connected to the medical system in the country, this in turn is driven by the National Health Strategy which has been designed to push health care further than ever before by 2016.

There are also a range of private health care services and facilities which are available for public use, these include clinics, practices, home nursing care, surgeries, dentistry and rehabilitation. Additionally the system has a Preventative Health Department designed to help prevent contagious diseases, qualm quarantines and promote healthy living.

Transportation

Beginning in 2002, the Qatar’s government launches Mowasalat, a company owned by the Royal Family designed to help integrate ground-based transportation throughout the country. This company has been running a monopoly on Taxis around Doha but is also responsible for setting up over 35 routes for Public Buses. There are over 1,230km worth of roads through Qatar with over 1100km of them paved. 

Now under the name Karwa, the company owns over three-thousand Taxis and Airport Taxis as well as over 120 Public Buses, School Buses and private Coaches. The company even set a world record for the largest parade of buses numbering exactly three-hundred. It also runs a Limousine Service with over one-hundred of the cars in its possession as well as over two-hundred VIP Units.

High speed rail lines are planned and under construction in Doha and will consist of three lines; Doha Metro, Long Distance and Light Rail Transit, totalling over 750km of track and over a hundred stations for both passengers and freight alike. These lines are expected to link together the stadiums used for the 2022 FIFA World Cup.

The country uses two types of pipeline, 235km worth of Crude Oil lines and 400km worth of Natural Gas lines. There are four ports within the Persia gulf with regular ships moving between the ports, these include Doha, Halul Island, Umm Sa’id and Ras Laffan. Qatar also has six airports which include the Doha International Airport, the Al Khor Airport, the planned Hamad International Airport and three unpaved airfields.

Embassies

Below is a list of all Embassies in Qatar:

Afghani Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Afghanistan in Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone:  (+974-4) 930821-2 
(+974) 4932319
Fax: (+974-4) 930819 
(+974) 4932330
Website: http://www.afghanembassydoha.org/embassy/
Email: doha@afghanistan-mfa.net
Details: Khaled A. Zekriya Ambassador Non-resident envoy to: Bahrain
 
 Algerian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Algeria in Doha, Qatar
Area nr 63 Villa nr 52
Modern Dafna Al Either
Street nr 941 Doha
·         City: Doha
Phone: 974 4 83 11 86, 974 4 83 11 87
Fax: 974 4 83 64 52
 
 Azerbaijani Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Azerbaijan in Doha, Qatar
West Bay-Dafna, str. 66, Saba 41
P.O. Box 23900
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone:  (0974) 493 24 50
Fax: (0974) 493 17 55
Email: azembassy@qatar.com.qa
 
 Bahraini Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Bahraini Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Al Dafna, Anaizah Street, Section 66
P.O.Box: 24888
Doha
Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone:  (+974) 4483 9360 / 1 /  (+974) 4483 9370
Fax: (+974) 4483 1018
Email: doha.mission@mofa.gov.bh
Office Hours: 08:00 am - 14:15 pm Thursday 08:00 am - 13:00 pm
 
 Bangladeshi Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Bangladeshi Embassy in Doha, Qatar
77 Musaab Bin Omair Street
Al-Hilal
P.O. Box 2080
Doha
Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone:  (+974) 4467 1927 /  (+974) 4467 3471
Fax: (+974) 4467 1190
Website: http://www.bdembassydoha.com
Email: bdootqat@qatar.net.qa
 
 Belgian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Belgium in Doha, Qatar
Al Sanaa Street, District 64
(between al Markhia and al Jamia Av.)
Doha - State of Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: + (974) 493.15.42
+ (974) 493.14.99
Fax: + (974) 493.01.51
Email: doha@diplobel.be
Office Hours: Sunday through Thursday 8.00 am to 1 pm
 
 Bosnian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Bosnia and Herzegovina to the State of Qatar
Building 6, Saha 52-66
Al Aldafna Area
P.O.Box 876
Doha, The State of Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 411 3828
Fax: +974 411 3234
Website: http://www.bhembassyqatar.org
Email: ambasada@qatar.net.qa
Office Hours: Working hours: from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Sunday to Thursday
 
 Brazilian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Brazil in Qatar
AL Dafna, Area 66, Saha 95, West Bay
P.O.BOX 23122
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: (974) 483-8812/483-8227
Fax: (974) 483-8087
Email: brasil@brasembdoha.com.qa
 
 Bruneian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Bruneian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Area 66, Saha 102
West Bay [Diplomatic Area]
Doha, Qatar
P.O.BOX: 22772
·         City: Doha
Phone: (974) 4831956 / 4831962
Fax: (974) 4836798
Email: doha.qatar@mfa.gov.bn
Office Hours: 0800 - 1400 hrs Sunday - Thursday
 
 Canadian Embassy in Qatar
The Embassy of Canada to Qatar
c/o 24 Al-Mutawaket Street,
Block 4, Da'Aiah Area
Kuwait City, Kuwait
·         Phone:  (011-965) 256-3025
Fax: (011-965) 256-4167
Email: kwait@international.gc.ca
 
 Chinese Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Chinese Embassy in Doha, Qatar
1085 West Bay Lagoon Street
West Bay Area
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: 00974-4934203
00974-4934204
Fax: 00974-4934201
Website: http://qa.china-embassy.org/eng/
Email: Chinashi@qatar.net.qa
 
 Cuban Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Cuba in Doha, Qatar
Saha 76, New Dafna
WestBay Lagoon-P.O.Box: 12017
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: (974) 411 0713
(974) 411 0717
Fax: (974) 411 0387
Website: http://www.cubadiplomatica.cu/qatar
Email: embacuba@qatar.net.qa
Office Hours: Sunday to Wednesday, 9:00 am. to 1:00 pm Closed on public holidays and holidays Cuba & Qatar
Details: Ambassador: Armando Vergara Bueno
 
 Cypriot Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of the Republic of Cyprus in Doha, Qatar
Saba Saha 12 Street, Bld. No. 3
District 63, West Bay
P.O.Box 24482
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: + 974 44934390/1 (office), 44933086 (Cons.), 44932970 (Res.)
Fax: + 974 44933087
Website: http://www.mfa.gov.cy/embassydoha
Email: kyprosdoha@qatar.net.qa
Office Hours: 07:00 - 14:30 (Sun. - Thur.)
 
 Djibouti Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of the Republic of Djibouti in Qatar
23796 State of Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 4838461
Fax: (+974) 4839245
Email: mahamadeali@hotmail.com
 
 Djibouti Embassy in Riyadh, Qatar
Embassy of the Republic of Djibouti in Saudi Arabia
Quartier Salah-Uddin 40 Rue Al Broud
11693
·         City: Riyadh
Phone:  (+966-1) 4543583, 4543182
Fax: (+966-1) 4569068
Email: dya_bamakhrama@hotmail.com
 
 Dominican Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Dominican Republic in Qatar
West Bay Lagoon. St. 27. Villa # 15
P.O. Box: 23545 Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 4113868
Fax: +974 4113267
Website: http://www.domrepemb-qatar.com
Email: dominicanrepembassydoha@hotmail.com
 
 Egyptian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Egypt in Qatar
DIPLOMATIC ZONE P.O. BOX: 2899 DOHA
·         City: Doha
Phone: (00974) 4832115 - 4832116 - 4832555 - Dir: 4832424
Fax: (00974) 4832196
Website: http://www.mfa.gov.eg/missions/qatar/doha/embassy/ar-eg
Email: eg.emb_doha@mfa.gov.eg
 
 Salvadoran Embassy in Doha, Qatar
El Salvador Embassy in Qatar
Villa No. 2, Saha 72, Sector 66 New District Doha, West Bay
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 4110195, 4110304
Email: esv-q@rree.gob.sv
 
 Eritrean Embassy in Dohar, Qatar
Embassy of the State of Eritrea in Qatar
P.O. Box 4309
D-Ring Road 14
·         City: Dohar
Phone: +974-466-7934
Fax: +961-466-4139
 
 French Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of France in Doha, Qatar
West Bay, PO box 2669
·         City: Doha
Phone: [974] 483 22 83
Fax: [974] 483 22 54
Website: http://www.ambafrance-qa.org
Email: ambadoha@qatar.net.qa
 
 French Consulate in Doha, Qatar
Consular Section of the Embassy of France in Doha, Qatar
West Bay, PO box 2669, Doha
·         City: Doha
Phone: [974] 483 22 83
Fax: [974] 483 55 34
Website: http://www.ambafrance-qa.org
Email: ambadoha@qatar.net.qa
 
 Greek Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Greece in Doha
P.O. Box 15721 Doha - Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: (00974) 4128150
Fax: (00974) 4128160
Email: gremb.doha@mfa.gr
 
 Indian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of India in Doha, Qatar
No. 6, Al Jaleel Street,
Al Hilal Area
P.O. Box 2788
·         City: Doha
Phone: 00-974-4672021, 4674660
Fax: 00-974-4670448
Website: http://www.indianembassy.gov.qa
Email: indembdh@qatar.net.qa
Details: ---
 
 Indonesian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Indonesia in Doha, Qatar
Al-Maahed Street
Al Salata Al Jadeeda
(P.O.BOX 22375)
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: (974) 465-7945, 466-4981
Fax: (974) 465-7610
Website: http://www.kbridoha.com
Email: inemb@qatar.net.qa
Office Hours: Sunday - Thursday : 08:30 - 12:30 and 13:30 - 16:30 Friday & Saturday : Closed
 
 Iraqi Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of The Republic of Iraq in Qatar.
Embassy of the Republic of Iraq,Doha
·         City: Doha
Phone: (00974) 4672263 / (00974) 4672257
Fax: 00974/4673347
Email: dohemb@iraqmofamail.net
 
 Iraqi Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of The Republic of Iraq in Qatar.
Embassy of the Republic of Iraq,Doha
·         City: Doha
Phone: (00974) 4672263 / (00974) 4672257
Fax: 00974/4673347
Email: dohemb@iraqmofamail.net
 
 Italian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Italian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Dafna 61
·         City: Doha
Phone: 009744831828, 009744831802, 4831803
Fax: 009744831909
Website: http://www.ambdoha.esteri.it
Email: ambasciata.doha@esteri.it, consolare.doha@esteri.it
 
 Jordanian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Jordan in Doha, Qatar
Al Mantiqa Al Diplomaciya
Al Khaleeg Al Arabi
00974
·         City: Doha
Phone: 974-832-202
Fax: 974-832-173
Website: http://www.jordanembassy.com.qa
Email: jordand@qatar.net.qa
Office Hours: Monday - Thursday:8:00-3:00 Sunday: 8:00-3:00
 
 Kazakhstani Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan in Doha
93, sector 66, Dafna
25513
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974-412-8015
Fax: +974-412-8014
Email: embassykz@qatar.net.qa
Details: Ambassador Azamat R. BERDYBAY
 
 Kuwaiti Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Kuwaiti Embassy in Doha, Qataar
P.O.Box 1177
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 4832111, 4832127
Fax: (+974) 4832042
 
 Lebanese Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Lebanon in Doha, Qatar
Al Haditha Area 63
United Nation Street Villa No 5
P.O. Box 2411
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 493-3330
Fax: (+974) 493-3331
Email: embleb@qatar.net.qa
 
 Libyan Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Libya in Doha, Qatar
Box 574
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 421776
Fax: +974 429548
 
 Macedonian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of the Republic of Macedonia in Doha, Qatar
Al-Ithar Street Villa No.28
Dafna - Diplomatic Area
Po BOX: 24262, Doha
Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 49 31 374
Fax: +974 48 31 572
Email: doha@mfa.gov.mk
 
 Malaysian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Malaysia in Doha, Qatar
Zone 66, Lusail Street,
West Bay, Dafna,
P.O Box 23760
Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 4836463 / 493
Fax: +974 4836 453
Website: http://www.kln.gov.my/perwakilan/doha
Email: maldoha@kln.gov.my
Office Hours: Work day: Sunday - Thursday 0830hrs - 1630hrs [Consular: 0900 - 1200, 1400 - 1500] Holiday : Friday & Saturday
 
 Moroccan Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Morocco in Doha, Qatar
Diplomatic Area West Bay
P.O. Box: 3242
Doha
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 483-1884 / 5
Fax: (+974) 483-3416
Email: moroccoe@qatar.net, moroccoe@qatar.net.qa, moroccoe@yahoo.com
Details: Chargé d'Affaires a.i: Mr. Bouzekri Raihani
 
 Nepalese Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Nepal in Doha, Qatar
Villa No 13,
Street No 810,
42, Ibne Bajah
·         City: Doha
Phone: +00974-467-5681, 5683
Fax: +00974-467-5680
Website: http://www.rnedoha.org.qa/
Email: rnedoha@qatar.net.qa
 
 Omani Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of the Sultanate of Oman in Doha, Qatar
Near West Bay Petrol Stationt
Region 63, Saha 17, Villa No.3
Al-Dafna,P.O. Box 1525
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 493 1514 / 1910
Fax: (+974) 493 2278
Email: oman-e126@hotmail.com
Office Hours: 07:30 - 13:30
Details: Ambassador:Mr. Rashed Bin Mubarak Bin Rashed Al- Ghelany
 
 Pakistani Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan in Doha, Qatar
30, Diplomatic Area, West Bay,
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 4832525, 4832235-7
Fax: (+974) 4832227
Email: parepqat@qatar.net.qa
 
 Palestinian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Palestine Embassy in Qatar
Al-Khalij St., PO Box 138, 4100616
·         City: Doha
Phone: 974-4688272
Fax: 974-4688949
Email: palembs@qatar.net.qa
 
 Filipino Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Philippines in Doha, Qatar
Villa # 7 A1 Eithar Street
Saha 2, West Bay Area
P.O. Box 24900
Doha, STATE OF QATAR
·         City: Doha
Phone: (00974) 483-1585; 483-2560
Fax: (00974) 483-1595
Email: dohape@dfa.gov.ph / dohape@yahoo.com
 
 Polish Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Polish Embassy in Qatar
Al-Qutaifiya 66, Str. No. 519 Saha 4 West Bay
·         City: Doha
Phone:  +51.1.471.3920
Fax: +974.411.3230
Website: http://www.doha.polemb.net/
Email: doha.amb.sekretariat@msz.gov.pl
 
 Romanian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Romania in Doha, Qatar
Ibn Roshd Street, No. 40, Dafna Area
P.O.Box 22511
·         City: Doha
Phone: (00) (974) 4934848 or 4930369
Fax: (00) (974) 4934747
Email: romamb@qatar.net.qa
 
 Russian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Russia in Doha, Qatar
P.O. BOX. 15404, doha, Qatar New Doha (Qatifiya)
Area 66, Street #804, Villa #4
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 483-62-31, 483-68-21
Fax: +974 483-62-43
Website: http://www.qatar.mid.ru
Email: rusemb@qatar.net.qa
 
 Saudi Arabian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Saudi Arabia Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Dafna - Diplomatic Area
·         City: Doha
Phone: 007944832030/ 007944832711/ 007944832712/ 007944832713
Fax: 007944832720
Website: http://www.mofa.gov.sa/sites/mofaen/SaudiMissionsAbroad/SaudiEmbassiesAbroad/Asia/Pages/EmbassyID40946.aspx
Email: qaemb@mofa.gov.sa
Office Hours: From 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
 
 Senegalese Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Senegal Embassy , Qatar
New Salata - D-Ring Road, Villa n, Doha
PO Box 8291
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 467 65 67/467 42 28
Fax: +974 467 65 89
Email: amsendo@qatarnet.ga
Details: Responsible for Israel, Palestine and Qatar
 
 Seychelles Consulate in Doha, Qatar
Consulate of Seychelles in Doha, Qatar
47854 Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Email: tym@hotmail.com
 
 Singaporean Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Singapore in Qatar
New West Bay Area (off Lusail Street)
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974-412-8082 / +974-412-8083
Fax: +974-412-8180 / +974-412-818
Website: http://http://www.mfa.gov.sg/doha
Email: singemb_doh@sgmfa.gov.sg
Office Hours: Sun - Thurs 8.30am to 3.30pm
 
 South African Embassy in Doha, Qatar
South Africa Embassy , Qatar
Stand 801 Saha 570 Plot Number 5
West Bay Lagoon Doha
P O Box 24744 Doha State of Qatar
-
-
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974-4857111
Fax: +974-4835961
Email: doha.admin@foreign.gov.za
 
 Spanish Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Spain in Doha, Qatar
Al- Isteqlal Aven- West Bay
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974)-4844104 / 4835886 / 4835901
Fax: +974-4844101 / +974-4835887
Email: emb.esp.qatar@terra.es
 
 Sudanese Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Sudan in Qatar
Al-Hilal Street
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 4831508,4831474, 4831473
Fax: (+974)-4833031
Email: osman@qatar.net.qa
 
 Syrian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of the Syrian Arab Republic in Doha, Qatar
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 4831844, 4832409
Fax: (+974) 4832139
Website: http://www.syrianembassy.com.qa/Welcome.htm
Email: info@syrianembassy.com.qa
 
 Thai Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Thailand in Qatar
Villa No. 162
Al Eithar Street
Dafna, Westbay Area,
P.O. Box 22474
Doha
·         City: Doha
Phone: (974) 4550715, 4550716, 4934426, 4934432
Fax: (974) 4550835, 4930514
Website: http://www.thaiembqatar.com
Email: thaidoh@qatar.net.qa
 
 Tunisian Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Tunisia in Qatar
West Bay
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974-4832645
Fax: +974-4832649
Email: at.doha@qatar.net.qa
 
 Turkish Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Turkey in Qatar
Dafna - Al Istqlal street
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974 495 1300
Fax: +974 495 1320
Email: turkishamboffice@gmail.com
 
 Emirati Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of United Arab Emirates in Doha, Qatar
22 Al Markhiyah Street, Khalifa Northern Town
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974-4838880/+974-4836082
Fax: +974-4836186
Email: emarat@qatar.net.qa
 
 American Embassy in Doha, Qatar
U.S. Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Al-Luqta district
22nd February Street
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: 974 496 6089 (between the hours of 1:30 to 3:30 pm)
Fax: (974) 488-4298
Website: http://qatar.usembassy.gov
Email: nivconsulardoha@state.gov, ConsularDoha@state.gov.
Office Hours: Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday mornings by appointment only.
 
 Venezuelan Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Venezuela in Qatar
Villa No 57-826, Al-Mabahej Street, 66 West Bay
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: +974-493-2730 / +974-493-2734
Fax: +974-493-2729
Email: embavenqatar@qatar.net.qa
 
 Yemeni Embassy in Doha, Qatar
Embassy of Yemen in Doha, Qatar
P.O.Box 3318
Villa Mohamed Maayouf Al-Naimy
Doha, Qatar
·         City: Doha
Phone: (+974) 4432555, 4326558, 4671050/1
Fax: (+974) 4429400

Phone Lines

In Qatar there are over 200,000 telephone lines in use with over a million mobile phones. The system is an up-to-date modern system centred in Doha.

Internet

There are two Internet Service Providers in the country, Ooredoo and Vodafone, which also provide Broadband Internet, with over 75,000 users. The top level domain is .qa and the country is rapidly upgrading to fibre-optic connections. Typical speed to cost per month is:

  • ADSL 1mb – QAR 200 (about $55 or £35)
  • ADSL 2mb – QAR 300 (about $85 or £50)
  • ADSL 4mb – QAR 400 (about $110 or £65)
  • ADSL 8mb – QAR 600 (about $165 or £100)

Communications

The Radio broadcast stations are set as AM 6, FM 5 and shortwave one with over 250,000 radios in use. There is only a single Television broadcasting station and there are over 230,000 Televisions in use.

Weather & Climate

Qatar has some of the hottest summers and the mildest winters in the world and remains fairly dry throughout the year. The highest average temperatures are typically between June and August at 41 degrees Centigrade (106 degrees Fahrenheit) and the lowest average temperatures are usually between December and February at around 13 degrees Centigrade (55 degrees Fahrenheit).

Typically the weather is incredibly sunny with sun all year around. However, around 71mm of rain falls a year with the wettest months between January and March (at up to 18mm of rain) and the driest months are typically June to October where it is normal to have no rainfall whatsoever.


Holidays

Qatar houses both some of the most high-class and some of the most affordable hotels in the world, some hotels worthy of notation are listed below:
Designed to stand tall and prominently in the Doha skyline, The Torch features a modern design with a distinct artistic sense of glamour and chic style. Each room features a mood light system with twelve varied colours, free wi-fi, a minibar and an on-suite bathroom.

The Concorde Hotel in Doha has absolutely everything you need for that wonderful getaway in the Middle East, it features an outdoor pool, a fitness center, a high-class restaurant and is situated just five minutes from Souq Waqif. Each room features free Wi-Fi, a large TV and a safe.

Featuring a female-only floor with all-female staff and a private check-in system, The Coral in Doha features a wide array of brightly but stylishly furnished rooms coming complete with a flat-screen TV and an on-suite bathroom. The hotel however, also features a Middle Eastern restaurant, an indoor pool, massage treatments and a gym.

The Swiss-Belhotel in Doha features a wide range of incredibly spacious accommodations with contemporary Arabian décor and each room is equipped with a flat-screen TV a safe and a minibar. The hotel itself features an outdoor poor, a gym and free Wi-Fi all over the hotel.

Prefer a bit of a castle by the sea? You’ll love the Sealine Beach Resort placed between the Arabian Sea and the Desert in Mesaieed. Designed to look and feel like an oasis and tropical paradise, the Sealine Beach Resort features a carefully landscaped pool area and the excellently staffed Lagoon Ristaurante.

Not far from Mesaieed is the Holiday Villa Hotel & Residence Centre. Just a short ten minute drive from Doha International Airport, the Centre includes an outdoor pool, fully serviced apartments and several restaurants serving Arabic and Asian food. The rooms each include a large flat-screen TV with satellite channels and a warmly themed décor.

Featuring a unique blend of Asian and Arabic stylizations, the Ritz-Carlton in Al Khor has been situated on a beautiful island and entails a large lagoon-style outdoor pool as well as a private marina, a spa, an indoor pool, a sauna, roman baths, a steam room and eight different lounges, bars and restaurants.

Featuring over three-hundred-and-forty rooms, the Grand Hyatt keeps a traditional Arabian architectural theme and incorporates both indoor and outdoor pools as well as a private beach. Each room has been warmly furnished and each one features a balcony with a wondrous view.

Moving to Al Wakrah, the Doha International Airport houses the Oryx Rotana Hotel. This exclusive hotel has been designed to help you recooperate and recover from all that travelling and jet lag with soundproof rooms, several restaurants, an outdoor pooz and a club which regularly plays live jazz music.

The Copthorne Hotel is based not far from Al Wakrah in Doha and features a range of massage treatments, a gym, a sauna, a spa and an indoor swimming poor. Each room comes fully equipped with free Wi-Fi, a flat-screen TV, a minibar and is furnished brightly. 

Only an expatriate earning more than QAR 10,000 (about $2,800 or £1,700) a month is allowed to bring their family with them. It’s also important to mention that women employed by private companies often struggle to sponsor their families and some companies do not allow family VISAs until six months into the employment. All successful sponsored spouses and children can be brought into Qatar on a special entry VISA then must complete the residence permit process by the end of the following week, this involves tests for Tuberculosis, Hepatitis and HIV as well as fingerprinting.

Unmarried couples are not allowed to live together in Qatar. This may cause complications if you have dependants and are not married to your partner who intends to move with you.

To bring a pet into the country, first you must obtain a permit from a veterinary clinic under the Department of Animal Resources, this will require your employer’s sponsor, a health certificate for the animal issued from the home country within 14 days of the animal’s entry into Qatar and an up-to-date vaccination against rabies, additionally:

Dogs must have vaccinations for:

  • Distemper
  • Hepatitis
  • Parvovirus
  • Parainfluenza
  • Leptospirosis
Cats must have vaccinations for:
  • Calicivirus
  • Rhinotracheitis
  • Panleukopaenia.
All vaccinations must be given 30 days before travel and the animal can’t be more than four months old and permits are valid for one month at a time. Upon arrival in Qatar the pet will be held in a special facility in Doha International Airport until they have cleared customs. You should provide a container for the animal approved by the airline you are using, generally speaking any container which is properly ventilated and is big enough for the animal to stand and turn around is suitable. Finally, all pets must be micro-chipped and must have collars to identify them from strays in case of escape and/or loss.

The following breeds of dog are prohibited from entering the country:
  • Afghan
  • American Staffordshire Terrier
  • Boxer
  • Bulldog
  • Bull Mastiff
  • Bull Terrier
  • Doberman
  • Great Dane
  • Japanese Akita
  • Pug
  • Rottweiler
  • Shar Pei
  • Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Directed and controlled by the Ministry of Education and more so by the Supreme Education Council, the education system in Qatar is considered to be one of the most diverse in the world with schools originating from all over the globe.

Primary education is obligatory for all children but is free in all public schools. Most expatriates and some Qatari nationals tend to send their children to either international schools or private schools and these will tend to use the IB, UK and CBSE Curricula, or a combination. Popular schools include Qatar Academy, Doha College, Doha Academy, MES Indian School, The Cambridge School and the American School of Doha.

Additionally a multitude of prestigious universities have satellite campuses all over the country, especially in Doha and especially in Education City. These include United States campuses for Cornell, Carnegie Mellon, Virginia Commonwealth and Texas A&M Universities, Canadian campuses for the Universities of Calgary-Qatar and the North Atlantic-Qatar, the British campus University College London and the Dutch campus Stenden University. 

Applicants are expected to be Native speakers of English, have a Degree in line with your chosen field as well as teaching qualifications and must be western trained (UK, US, Canada or Australia). Two years of experience is also very commonly demanded.

Also, CEFL, TEFL, Delta and other similar certificates, although not considered to be valid teaching qualifications will still be considered by the employer as a bonus if you have them. 

Also don’t forget to check our guide to VISA & Work Permit Restrictions


Beginning with housing, monthly rent for a one bedroom apartment in the city centre of Doha will cost you around QAR 7000 (about $2000 or £1200), while three bedroom apartments will set you back around QAR 14,000 (about $3900 or £2400). Meanwhile outside of the city centre a one bedroom apartment will cost about QAR 5000 (around $1400 or £900) and a three bedroom apartment costs about QAR 10,000 (around $2800 or £1700).

Food is similarly priced with restaurants varying between QAR 30 to QAR 200 ($8.25 to $55.95 or £5 to £33.15). A liter of Milk costs around QAR 6.15 ($1.70 or £1), 500g of Bread is typically at QAR 5.45 ($1.50 or £0.90) and 12 Eggs are usually QAR 9.35 ($2.60 or £1.55).

Half a litre of Beer typically costs about QAR 19.25 ($5.30 or £3.20), a Pack of Cigarettes tend to be around QAR 9 ($2.50 or £1.50) and a bottle of mid-range Wine ends up at QAR 75 ($20.60 or £12.45). The average monthly Salary in Qatar is at around QAR 14,800 ($4000 or £2500). 

Qatar also comprises a large variety of clubs, societies and organizations, some of the most notable are listed below:

The QCF or Qatar Cycling Federation is responsible for holding a range of cycling-related events, days out and competitions throughout the year and features a variety of teams for all ages. They recently completed one of their biggest events, the tour of Al Zubarah!

Like Squash? Perhaps you should consider the John Lord Duffers League. This tongue-in-cheek-humour group is Qatar’s premiere Squash group and is home to over a hundred members!

Perhaps you like your Rugby? Doha RFC welcomes newcomers with open arms as both players and spectators alike and features players of all ages from six to sixty, the RFC even includes a ladies club!

Organizing a monthly programme of talks, field days out in the nearby desert and age-old structures, the Qatar Natural History Group regularly meets and works together to uncover the secrets held by this age-old region.

Doha Golf Club practices at a range of courses but has their clubhouse situated in Doha’s Golf Course. The clubhouse itself features a range of Arabian-style motifs but the club is comprised of both Qatari nationals and expatriates.

Founded in 1959, the Doha Sailing Club has been authorised to use Qatar’s national waters by the Qatari government. The club is multi-national and is affiliated with the International Sailing, RYA, 470, Optimist and Laser International Classes Associations.

The Qatar Chess Association comprises the various clubs from across the region and is world-revered for their repeated champion-level chess players sent to compete in the World Chess Championships.

Featuring a variety of international and national players, the Doha Hockey Club regularly organizes tournaments with other teams from Bahrain, Kuwait, Sudan, the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and the rest of Qatar and is known for their friendly attitude.

The Al Rayyan Football Club is one of Qatar’s top teams and some of its top sporting prowess. The team features mainly Qatari Nationals but some expatriates do take part as well.

A club for the ladies, the Doha Gardening Club is a relaxed venue determined to develop gardening skills to the next level and overcome the unfavourable conditions of the country’s climate. 

The Crime Rate in Qatar is incredibly low compared to any other developed or developing nation and only petty crime and violence ever occurs, although it is incredibly rare in either case. Abuse of domestic workers and labourers is uncommon but does occasionally happen too and even rarer is commercial sexual exploitation. Terrorist attack is of higher concern and the region has received several threats from terrorist sects such as al Qaeda, as well as a single bombing in 2005 but none since.

In the Corruption Perceptions Index 2007 Qatar was ranked 32nd least corrupt country in the world and Transparency International rated Qatar 6.0 on their scale of 0 to 10 (with 10 being least corrupt). The rates of homicide, rape and other serious crimes are remarkably low within the country.

Emergency Numbers

  • General Emergency – 999
  • Worldwide Emergency Number – 112
  • Electricity and Water – 991
  • Telephone Assistance – 111
  • Local Directory – 180
  • International Calls Enquiries – 150
  • Time – 140 (or) 141